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  • Author or Editor: Stephen J. Engler x
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Summary

Malignant digital tumors were diagnosed in 62 dogs during a 1-year period. Twenty-one (33.9%) of the dogs had subungual squamous cell carcinoma. Each of these dogs had involvement of single digits. Sixteen (76.2%) of the dogs with squamous cell carcinoma were large-breed dogs, and 15 (71.4%) had predominantly black coats. Labrador Retrievers (n = 5,23.8%) and Standard Poodles (n = 3,14.3%) were the most commonly represented purebreeds. None of the dogs had evidence of metastases prior to treatment. All 21 tumors were treated by amputation of the involved digit. Histologic evidence of neoplastic bone invasion was found in 15 of the 21 amputated digits (71.4%). Local tumor recurrences were not observed. Only 1 dog developed documented metastatic disease; this dog was euthanatized because of pulmonary metastases 5 months after surgery. At the time of this report, 9 dogs (42.9%) were alive with no evidence of disease (median, 26 months after surgery), and 11 dogs (52.4%) had died or were euthanatized (median, 20 months after surgery). The cause of death in 7 dogs was known to be unrelated to squamous cell carcinoma, and the cause of death in 4 dogs was unknown. The 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 76.2% and 42.9%, respectively.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Questionnaires were sent to veterinarians who had submitted a fibrosarcoma from a cat to the surgical pathology services of the veterinary schools of the University of Pennsylvania and Tufts University between Jan 1, 1991 and June 30, 1992. Questionnaire items included signalment, FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus status, site of sarcoma, vaccination site, vaccines used, treatment, biologic behavior of the tumor, and final outcome. Data were analyzed, using Student’s t-test for continuous data, χ2 test for categoric data, and log-rank test for survival estimates. Comparing results for cats with vaccination-site (vs) tumors and nonvaccination-site (nvs) tumors, we determined that vs tumors developed in younger cats and were larger than nvs tumors. Although vs sarcomas were biologically aggressive and redeveloped more often than nvs sarcomas, metastasis was not detected, and cats with vs tumors survived longer than cats with nvs tumors.

Vaccination-site sarcomas developed in cats after injection of many types of vaccines, administered singularly or in combination. Of the cats in the vs group administered a single vaccine, 37% were given rabies, 33% were given feline viral rhinotracheitis/calicivirus/panleuhopenia virus, and 30% were given FeLV vaccines. Cats with vs tumors were more likely to have received FeLV vaccine and less likely to have received rabies vaccine than those with nvs tumors. Although vaccines produced by certain manufacturers were used most often in cats with vs and nvs sarcomas, it was believed that this probably represented marketing practices and brand popularity. Many of the vaccines used had aluminum and other highly immunogenic adjuvants. We hypothesized that resident fibroblasts and myofibroblasts proliferated in the cats in response to injected adjuvants or other vaccine components, and, in some cats, these cells eventually underwent neoplastic transformation.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate response to chemotherapy in cats with alimentary lymphoma and to determine factors associated with survival time.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

28 cats with alimentary lymphoma that underwent chemotherapy.

Results

In all cats, the diagnosis had been established by means of cytologic or histologic examination of ultrasound-guided aspirates and biopsy specimens (18 cats), histologic examination of surgically obtained biopsy specimens (7 cats), or examination of specimens obtained endoscopically (3 cats). Clinical signs included anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, and diarrhea. Twenty-seven cats were treated with vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone; 1 was treated with chlorambucil and prednisone. Survival time ranged from 2 to 2,120 days (median, 50 days). Nine cats achieved complete remission (remission time ranged from 30 to 1,700 days; median, 213 days), 2 achieved partial remission, and 17 failed to respond to chemotherapy. Sex, FeLV status, hematocrit, serum total protein concentration, site and extent of gastrointestinal involvement, and clinical stage were not found to be associated with survival time.

Clinical Implications

Cats with alimentary lymphoma are poorly responsive to treatment with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone; however, a small subset of cats may have long survival times.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association