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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To establish the maximum concentration and duration of oxytetracycline residues in milk from cows with retained fetal membranes given the antimicrobial via intrauterine infusion, and to investigate whether the number of infusions or the presence of fever (> 39.7 C) affected the duration of residues.

Design—

Prospective study.

Animals—

54 Holstein cows with retained fetal membranes on a single 1,400-cow commercial dairy.

Procedure—

Cows were treated once a day with 5 g of oxytetracycline (50 ml of 100 mg/ml solution in a povidone base) by intrauterine infusion for at least 2 days, or until the membranes were expelled. Cows that became febrile (rectal temperature > 39.7 C) were also given 20,000 IU of procaine penicillin G/kg of body weight, IM, for 2 to 4 days. Milk samples were collected at 24-hour intervals during treatment, and at 12-hour intervals after the last treatment. All samples were frozen and submitted every 2 weeks for high performance liquid chromatography analysis for oxytetracycline.

Results—

Oxytetracycline was detected in milk of all cows during treatment, at a maximum concentration ranging from 47.2 to 1,804.6 μg/kg (mean, 316.9 μg/kg). Duration of oxytetracycline residues after the last infusion ranged from 0 to 144 hours (mean, 52.3 hours). Neither the number of infusions received, nor development of rectal temperature > 39.7 C, affected the maximum concentration or the duration of oxytetracycline residues in milk.

Clinical Implications—

Milk obtained from cows that had been treated for retained fetal membranes by intrauterine infusion of oxytetracycline should be discarded to avoid illegal residues. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:1753–1755)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

A dose titration study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of clorsulon against the adult stage of Fasciola hepatica in goats. Thirty-nine goats were experimentally infected with metacercariae of F hepatica. At 14 weeks after infection, each goat was assigned randomly to 1 of 5 groups. Goats in groups 1 to 4 received a single oral administration of clorsulon at dosages of 3.5, 7, 11, and 15 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The fifth group of goats (control group) was infected with F hepatica, but were not treated with clorsulon. Postmortem examination of goats at 3 weeks after treatment revealed mean reductions in numbers of flukes of 83, 98, 99, and 100% for groups 1 to 4, respectively. Mean percentage of reduction in eggs following treatment of groups was 82, 98, 100, and 100%, respectively.

The clinical effects of clorsulon in 24 goats that were not infected with F hepatica were studied. Goats in groups 1 to 3 received a single oral administration of clorsulon at dosages of 7, 21, and 35 mg/kg, respectively, every other day for a total of 3 doses/goat. Group-4 goats (control group) received a vehicle placebo. Goats in group 3 were subject to postmortem examination at 14 days after dosing. Abnormal signs or lesions that could be attributed to clorsulon were not found in any goat.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research