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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether use of a protective cover would affect temporospatial gait or ground reaction force (GRF) measurements obtained from dogs walking on a validated pressure-sensitive walkway (PSW).

ANIMALS

5 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a crossover study design, all dogs were walked across a calibrated PSW with and without a protective cover in place in random order. Temporospatial gait data and GRFs obtained with and without the cover in place were compared.

RESULTS

No significant differences were identified in temporospatial gait measurements obtained with versus without the cover in place. The bias was low for all variables, and the 95% limits of agreement included 0. In contrast, significant differences were found between measurements obtained with versus without the cover in place for most GRFs, with measurements obtained with the cover in place significantly lower than those obtained without a cover.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that for dogs walking over a PSW, GRFs, but not temporospatial gait variables, would be significantly lower if a protective cover was placed over the walkway, compared with values obtained without a cover in place.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure effects of dog position on L7-S1 intervertebral foraminal area and lumbosacral (LS) angle by means of computed tomography (CT) and determine whether changes in values between positions are associated with clinical signs in dogs with LS disease.

Animals—86 dogs examined via a positional CT protocol that included flexion and extension scans of L7-S1.

Procedures—Archived CT images and medical records were reviewed. Included dogs had good-quality flexion and extension CT scans of L7-S1 and no evidence of fractures, neoplasia, or previous LS surgery. One person who was unaware of CT findings recorded clinical status with regard to 3 signs of LS disease (right or left hind limb lameness and LS pain) at the time of CT evaluation. One person who was unaware of clinical findings measured L7-S1 foraminal areas and LS angles, with the aid of an image-analysis workstation and reformatted parasagittal planar CT images.

Results—Intraobserver variation for measurements of L7-S1 foraminal area ranged from 6.4% to 6.6%. Mean foraminal area and LS angle were significantly smaller when vertebral columns were extended versus flexed. Percentage positional change in L7-S1 foraminal area or LS angle was not significantly different among dogs with versus without each clinical sign. There was a significant correlation between percentage positional change in L7-S1 foraminal area and LS angle in dogs with versus without ipsilateral hind limb lameness and LS pain.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Positional CT is a feasible technique for quantifying dynamic changes in L7-S1 intervertebral foraminal morphology in dogs with LS disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the pattern of extension of modeled infection from the interdigital web spaces in dogs is predictable and whether the distribution differs among initial injury sites.

Sample Population—Thawed frozen forelimbs from 23 cadavers of previously healthy adult medium- to large-breed dogs.

Procedures—The manus of each forelimb was evaluated by use of computed tomography (CT) before and after injection of radiopaque blue-staining contrast medium into the interdigital web spaces. Two veterinary radiologists reviewed the CT images and recorded the extent of contrast medium from each site. Each manus was dissected or sectioned transversely after imaging, and the extent of contrast medium accumulation was recorded and compared with locations of CT contrast enhancement. The Fisher exact test was performed to determine whether the pattern of contrast medium extension differed by injection site.

Results—Injections made in the interdigital web spaces of the canine manus led to unique and predictable patterns of extension into the surrounding soft tissues. That pattern of extension primarily involved the soft tissues of the digits.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In humans, knowledge of common extension patterns from infected soft tissue spaces is used to predict the spread of disease within the hand and develop surgical plans that will minimize patient illness. Identification of the common sites of disease spread from the interdigital web spaces in dogs may help improve surgical planning and treatment for infection in the manus.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate a novel prosthesis technique for extracapsular stabilization of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL)–deficient stifle joints in adult cattle.

SAMPLE

13 cadaveric bovine stifle joint specimens.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 3 study phases, the most isometric points on the distal aspect of the femur (distal femur) and proximal aspect of the tibia (proximal tibia) were determined from measurements obtained from lateromedial radiographs of a stifle joint specimen maintained at angles of 135°, 90°, 65°, and 35°. During phase 2, 800-lb-test monofilament nylon leader line was cut into 73-cm-long segments. Each segment was secured in a loop by use of 2, 3, or 4 crimping sleeves such that there were 12 replicates for each construct. Each loop was distracted to failure at a constant rate of 1 mm/s. Mean force at failure and elongation and mode of failure were compared among the 3 constructs. During phase 3, bone tunnels were created in the distal femur and proximal tibia at the isometric points identified during phase 1 in each of 12 CCL-deficient stifle joint specimens. The 3-sleeve construct was applied to each specimen. Specimens were distracted to failure at a constant rate of 1 mm/s.

RESULTS

Among the 3 constructs evaluated, the 3-sleeve construct was considered optimal in terms of strength and amount of foreign material. In phase 3, all replicates failed because of suture slippage.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of 800-lb-test monofilament nylon leader line as a prosthesis might be a viable alternative for extracapsular stabilization of CCL-deficient stifle joints in adult cattle. Further in vivo studies are necessary.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare accuracy of a noninvasive single-plane fluoroscopic technique with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for determining 3-D femorotibial poses in a canine cadaver with normal stifle joints.

Sample—Right pelvic limb from a 25-kg adult mixed-breed dog.

Procedures—A CT scan of the limb was obtained before and after metal beads were implanted into the right femur and tibia. Orthogonal fluoroscopic images of the right stifle joint were acquired to simulate a biplanar fluoroscopic acquisition setup. Images were obtained at 5 flexion angles from 110° to 150° to simulate a gait cycle; 5 cycles were completed. Joint poses were calculated from the biplanar images by use of RSA with CT-derived beaded bone models and compared with measurements obtained by use of CT-derived nonbeaded bone models matched to single-plane, lateral-view fluoroscopic images. Single-plane measurements were performed by 2 observers and repeated 3 times by the primary observer.

Results—Mean absolute differences between the single-plane fluoroscopic analysis and RSA measurements were 0.60, 1.28, and 0.64 mm for craniocaudal, proximodistal, and mediolateral translations, respectively, and 0.63°, 1.49°, and 1.58° for flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and internal-external rotations, respectively. Intra- and interobserver repeatability was strong with maximum mean translational and rotational SDs of 0.52 mm and 1.36°, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that single-plane fluoroscopic analysis performed by use of CT-derived bone models is a valid, noninvasive technique for accurately measuring 3-D femorotibial poses in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare accuracy of a noninvasive single-plane fluoroscopic analysis technique with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for determining 3-D femorotibial poses in a canine cadaver stifle joint treated by tibial-plateau-leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

Sample—Left pelvic limb from a 25-kg adult mixed-breed dog.

Procedures—A CT scan of the left pelvic limb was performed. The left cranial cruciate ligament was transected, and a TPLO was performed. Radiopaque beads were implanted into the left femur and tibia, and the CT scan was repeated. Orthogonal fluoroscopic images of the left stifle joint were acquired at 5 stifle joint flexion angles ranging from 110° to 150° to simulate a gait cycle; 5 gait cycles were completed. Joint poses were calculated from the biplanar images by use of a digitally modified RSA and were compared with measurements obtained by use of hybrid implant-bone models matched to lateral-view fluoroscopic images. Single-plane measurements were performed by 2 observers and repeated 3 times by the primary observer.

Results—Mean absolute differences between results of the single-plane fluoroscopic analysis and modified RSA were 0.34, 1.05, and 0.48 mm for craniocaudal, proximodistal, and mediolateral translations, respectively, and 0.56°, 0.85°, and 1.08° for flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and internal-external rotations, respectively. Intraobserver and interobserver mean SDs did not exceed 0.59 mm for all translations and 0.93° for all rotations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that single-plane fluoroscopic analysis by use of hybrid implant-bone models may be a valid, noninvasive technique for accurately measuring 3-D femorotibial poses in dogs treated with TPLO.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

OBJECTIVE

To quantify 3-D femorotibial joint kinematics during ambulation in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture treated with lateral fabellotibial suture stabilization (LFTS).

ANIMALS

9 adult dogs (body weight, 15 to 35 kg [33 to 77 lb]) with unilateral complete CCL rupture.

PROCEDURES

Digital 3-D bone models of the femur and fabellae and tibia and fibula were created from CT scans. Lateral fluoroscopic images of stifle joints were collected during treadmill walking before surgery and 6 months after LFTS. The LFTS was performed with nylon leader material secured with knots. Gait cycles were analyzed with a 3-D to 2-D image registration process. Femorotibial joint kinematics (craniocaudal translation, internal-external rotation, and flexion and extension angles) were compared among CCL-deficient stifle joints before LFTS, CCL-deficient stifle joints 6 months after LFTS, and unaffected contralateral (control) stifle joints. Owners and veterinarians subjectively assessed lameness by use of a visual analog scale and gait examination, respectively, at each time point.

RESULTS

At midstance phase, medial cranial tibial translation decreased from 9.3 mm before LFTS to 7.6 mm after LFTS but remained increased when compared with control stifle joint values. Following LFTS, axial rotation and stifle joint flexion and extension angles were not significantly different from control stifle joints. On the owner survey, the median walking lameness score improved from 9.3 of 10 before surgery to 0.3 after surgery. On gait examination, median walking lameness score improved from 2 of 4 before surgery to 0 after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Stifle joint instability was only slightly mitigated at 6 months following LFTS performed with knotted nylon leader material in medium to large dogs with CCL rupture, despite improvement in lameness.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe long-term outcomes of cats managed medically for cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD) via a validated owner-based questionnaire.

ANIMALS

18 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES

Retrospective review of medical records at 2 tertiary referral hospitals was conducted for records of cats diagnosed with CCLD for which medical management was pursued. History, physical examination findings, and medical management strategies were recorded. Owner follow-up was obtained via phone call or an email correspondence interview using a 2-part questionnaire. Part 1 consisted of 5 multiple-choice questions evaluating short-term outcomes following initiation of medical management. Part 2 assessed long-term outcomes via the validated Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index—short form metrology instrument.

RESULTS

Mean follow-up time was 66.5 ± 46.7 months (range, 7 to 154 months). Medical management included oral analgesics, activity restriction, and joint supplements. Of the 18 cats, 13 (72%) were always able to bear weight or became weight bearing within a week following initiation of medical management, and 15 (83%) were reportedly clinically normal within 3 months of initiating medical management, with complete resolution of lameness occurring in less than 2 months in 12 of those cats. Long term, 17 of the 18 (94%) owners reported they felt that their cat had a good to excellent outcome with medical management. The mean Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index—short form score of all cats was 0.29 ± 0.53 (range, 0 to 2.13).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Based on owner follow-up, conservative, nonsurgical management of CCLD can be an effective and appropriate management strategy for some cats; however, some may be best treated with surgical stabilization.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association