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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To collect kinetic gait reference data of dogs of 2 breeds in their growth period during walking and trotting gait, to describe their development, and to investigate the weight support pattern over time.

ANIMALS

8 Foxhound-Boxer-Ingelheim Labrador Retriever mixed breeds and 4 Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Ground reaction force variables (GRFs), peak vertical force and vertical impulse, and temporal variables (TVs) derived therefrom; time of occurrence; and stance times were collected. Body weight distribution (BWD) was evaluated. Six measurements, each containing 1 trial in walking and 1 trial in trotting gait, were taken at age 10, 17, 26, 34, 52, and 78 weeks. The study period started July 17, 2013 and lasted until October 7, 2015. Area under the curve with respect to increase was applied. The difference of area under the curve with respect to increase values between breeds and gaits was analyzed using either the t test or the Mann-Whitney test. Generalized mixed linear models were applied.

RESULTS

Significant differences in gait and breed comparisons were found. Growing dogs showed a forelimb-dominated gait. The development of GRF and TV values over the study period were described.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Reference values for GRFs, TVs, and BWDs in growing dogs were given. A cranial shift in weight support over time was found during trotting gait. Smaller, younger dogs walked and trotted more inconsistently.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether an actual improvement in gait could be differentiated from physiologic differences or habituation effects during gait analysis of dogs.

ANIMALS

11 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

On 4 examination days, kinetic parameters were measured while dogs were walking on a treadmill. Differences in mean parameter values and habituation effects (ie, effect sizes) were quantified and compared among examination days. Coefficients of variation for repeated measurements were calculated to determine measurement reproducibility, and minimum differences were calculated to distinguish between physiologic fluctuation and an actual change in gait pattern.

RESULTS

Among the 4 examination days, mean absolute differences in peak vertical force and vertical impulse (VI) varied from 1.5% to 5.3% of body weight (BW) and 0.9% to 1.8% of BW·s, respectively. Mean absolute differences in the percentage of stance-phase duration (%SPD) and relative stride length (RSL) varied from 0.9% to 3.2% and 1.7% to 3.0%, respectively. Reproducibility of parameter measurements was good. Values for %SPD had the lowest amount of dispersion and largest effect size, suggesting a habituation effect for this parameter. Calculated minimum differences among the days for peak vertical force, VI, %SPD, and RSL did not exceed 9.9% of BW, 3.3% of BW·s, 5.8 percentage points, and 5.2 percentage points, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The %SPD of healthy dogs walking on a treadmill was the most sensitive and diagnostically reliable of the measured kinetic parameters, in contrast to VI and RSL. Findings suggested that actual changes can be distinguished from random physiologic fluctuations during gait analysis of dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the reliability of range-of-motion (ROM) measurements and describe physiologic differences in ROM or habituation effects during gait analysis of healthy dogs walking on a treadmill.

ANIMALS

11 orthopedically normal dogs.

PROCEDURES

ROM of appendicular joints was determined for each dog while walking on a treadmill on 3 consecutive examination days and once again 6 weeks later. Significant differences in ROM between examination days were determined and quantified. As a measure of reproducibility, the coefficient of variation for repeated measurements was calculated, as were the minimum differences necessary to distinguish between physiologic variation and true change in ROM.

RESULTS

Mean ROM of the shoulder, elbow, and carpal joints varied among examination days between 29.9° and 33.1°, 49.4° and 52.8°, and 7.7° and 88.1°, respectively. Mean associated minimum differences were 12.0°, 14.1°, and 35.6°. Mean ROM of the hip, knee, and tarsal joints varied between 32.9° and 35.8°, 33.7° and 36.8°, and 31.7° and 33.5°, respectively. Mean associated minimum differences were 16.2°, 14.0°, and 9.2°. Only ROM of the elbow joint was reproducible to a small degree. Few systematic effects were detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Measurement of ROM in healthy dogs walking on a treadmill was shown to be diagnostically unreliable owing to high variation among examination days. However, random physiologic fluctuations could be distinguished from systematic effects, demonstrating the importance of reliably applicable threshold values for follow-up treadmill examinations. The applicability of the minimum differences determined here to orthopedically diseased dogs remains to be determined.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—Two geldings, aged 11 and 17 years, were examined for treatment of ureteroliths located approximately 10 cm proximal to the bladder.

Clinical Findings—Ureteral obstruction was an incidental finding in 1 horse that was referred because of urinary tract obstruction and a cystic calculus. This horse did not have clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure, although severe hydronephrosis was evident on transabdominal ultrasonography. The second patient had a serum creatinine concentration of 6.3 mg/dL (reference range, 0.8 to 2.2 mg/dL) and mild hydronephrosis of the affected left kidney.

Treatment and Outcome—In both patients, the obstructed ureter was exteriorized through a flank incision as a standing procedure, and the calculus was crushed and removed with a uterine biopsy forceps introduced through a ureterotomy approximately 25 cm proximal to the calculus. The cystic calculus was removed through a perineal urethrostomy by lithotripsy, piecemeal extraction, and lavage. The horse without azotemia developed pyelonephritis in the affected kidney and was euthanatized because of complications of a nephrectomy 13 months later. In the horse with azotemia, the serum creatinine concentration decreased after surgery, and the horse returned to its intended use. However, it was euthanatized approximately 2 years after surgery because of progressive renal failure, and a large nephrolith was found in the previously unobstructed right kidney.

Clinical Relevance—The technique used for ureterolith removal was successful in both horses in this report, did not require sophisticated equipment, and could be effective in the early stages of ureteral obstruction as a means of restoring urine flow and renal function. The outcome in the horse with advanced unilateral renal disease without azotemia would suggest that nephrectomy should be considered as a treatment in such patients.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association