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A 10-year-old 24.6-kg (54.1-lb) spayed female German Shepherd Dog mix was evaluated because of signs of cervical pain of 1 month's duration and acute left pelvic limb lameness of 5 days’ duration.

Clinical and Clinicopathologic Findings

Physical examination revealed signs of pain during left tarsal joint manipulation and an enlarged left popliteal lymph node. Mild to moderate effusion was evident in the left tarsal region (Figure 1). Neurologic examination findings were considered normal other than signs of pain that were elicited on palpation of the midcervical region. Radiography revealed no obvious cervical abnormalities; however, mild thickening of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 7-year-old 54.5-kg (119.9-lb) neutered male Labrador Retriever was evaluated because of a sudden onset of paraplegia. Six days earlier, the dog was observed to be dragging its right pelvic limb. The dog had a history of left shoulder joint osteoarthritis and idiopathic epilepsy; epilepsy was currently being treated with phenobarbital. There was no known history of trauma, and the owner reported that the dog had no signs of pain. Physical examination revealed a rectal temperature of 38.2°C (100.7°F) and a heart rate of 100 beats/min. The dog was panting, and signs of pain were elicited only on manipulation of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An 11-month-old 4.05-kg (8.91-lb) castrated male Bengal cat was evaluated because of weight loss, generalized muscle atrophy, and tetraparesis. One month prior, the cat was limping on the left pelvic limb; within 1 week, the gait abnormality had progressed to both pelvic limbs. During the same period, the cat was reported to have decreases in appetite, water consumption, and overall activity level. Urination and defecation were considered normal, although the cat required assistance to posture in the litter box. Physical examination revealed a plantigrade stance and decreased muscle mass, most prominent in the pelvic limbs. Remaining physical examination findings were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association