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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the degree of activation of the contact pathway in citrated equine whole blood over holding times ≤ 30 minutes and assess effects of contact activation on recalcification-initiated thromboelastometry.

ANIMALS 11 healthy adult mixed-breed horses.

PROCEDURES Blood was collected by atraumatic jugular venipuncture into prewarmed evacuated siliconized glass tubes containing citrate anticoagulant and held at 37°C for ≤ 30 minutes. Thromboelastometry was performed with an in vitro viscoelasticity (thromboelastometry) monitoring system. Factor XII and factor XI procoagulant activities were determined in contemporaneously collected platelet-poor plasma samples by assessing changes in turbidity for 1 hour at approximately 25°C, with clotting times calculated by fitting a line to the steepest segment of the absorbance curve and determining its intersection with baseline. Effect of holding time on thromboelastometry parameters and plasma enzyme activity was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA on ranks. Association of procoagulant activities with coagulation time was determined by Spearman rank-order correlation analysis.

RESULTS Thromboelastometry parameters (coagulation time, clot formation time, α angle, and maximum clot firmness) reflected significant increases in coagulability during the holding period. Factor XII and factor XI procoagulant activities were significantly increased at 30 minutes, compared with 2 or 10 minutes (indicating contact activation of samples), and had significant negative correlation with coagulation time.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Ex vivo activation of the contact system in equine whole blood was evident, suggesting that recalcification of blood in the absence of a trigger is not an acceptable method of assessing the hemostatic system in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine time to first detection of Salmonella organisms in feces of animals after experimental infection PO and times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to evaluate a common method for identifying nosocomial infections on the basis of time of admission and onset of clinical signs (ie, the 3-day criterion).

Design—Meta-analysis.

Sample Population—Cattle, horses, goats, and sheep experimentally infected PO with Salmonella enterica subsp enterica.

Procedures—Online databases were searched for published reports describing results of experimental infection of cattle, horses, goats, and sheep PO with salmonellae. Time to detection of organisms in feces as well as to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia was noted. Analysis of covariance was used to examine relationships among these variables, host species and age, and Salmonella serovar and magnitude of infecting dose.

Results—Forty-three studies met the criteria for inclusion. Time to detection of salmonellae in feces ranged from 0.5 to 4 days. Times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia ranged from 0.33 to 11 days and from 0.27 to 5 days, respectively. Time to onset of diarrhea was related to host age and Salmonella serovar. No other associations were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Time to detection of salmonellae in feces is unreliable for identifying hospital-acquired infections; a 3-day criterion will misidentify hospital- versus community-acquired infections. Relying on clinical indices such as times to onset of diarrhea and pyrexia to trigger fecal sampling for detection of Salmonella infection will increase the risk of environmental contamination and nosocomial spread because animals may begin shedding organisms in feces several days prior.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate markers of in vivo platelet function (urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 [11-dehydroTXB2] and 2,3-dinorTXB2) and assess their response to administration of 2 commonly used dosages of aspirin in healthy dogs.

Animals—20 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Urine was collected prior to aspirin administration and on the morning following the last evening administration. Twenty dogs received aspirin (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 7 consecutive doses. After a washout period of 5 months, 10 dogs received a single dose of aspirin (10 mg/kg, PO). Concentrations of urinary thromboxane metabolites 11-dehydroTXB2 and 2,3-dinorTXB2 were measured via ELISA, and values were normalized to urine creatinine concentration.

Results—Median baseline 11-dehydroTXB2 concentrations were 0.38 ng/mg of creatinine (range, 0.15 to 1.13 ng/mg). Mean ± SD baseline 2 at a 3-dinorTXB2 concentrations were 6.75 ± 2.77 ng/mg of creatinine. Administration of aspirin at a dosage of 1 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours for 7 days did not significantly decrease urinary 11-dehydroTXB2 concentration, but administration of the single aspirin dose of 10 mg/kg did significantly decrease 11-dehydroTXB2 concentration by a median of 45.5% (range, 28.2% to 671%). Administration of the 1 mg/kg aspirin dosage significantly decreased urinary 2,3-dinorTXB2 concentration by a mean ± SD of 33.0 ± 23.7%. Administration of the single aspirin dose of 10 mg/kg also significantly decreased 2,3-dinorTXB2 concentration by a mean ± SD of 46.7 ± 12.6%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Aspirin administration (1 mg/kg/d) may be insufficient for reliable platelet inhibition in healthy dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the components of canine whole blood samples that contribute to results of thromboelastometry (TEM).

Animals—127 healthy dogs.

Procedures—For each dog, a blood sample was collected from a jugular vein into tubes containing no anticoagulant, EDTA, or citrate anticoagulant. Citrated whole blood samples underwent TEM with tissue factor and TEM with ellagic acid. Indicators of RBC mass and platelet concentration were evaluated, and plasma coagulation tests were performed; data obtained were compared with results of TEM. For technical reasons, samples were not available from all dogs for all tests.

Results—Coagulation time was correlated with concentrations of primarily extrinsic pathway coagulation factors for TEM with tissue factor and with most factors via TEM with ellagic acid. Clot formation time, α angle, and maximum clot firmness were highly correlated with fibrinogen and platelet concentrations and some individual factor concentrations. Sample Hct was strongly correlated with most measured variables; low Hct was associated with relative hypercoagulability, and high Hct was associated with relative hypocoagulability.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For TEM of canine blood samples, coagulation time was primarily a function of coagulation factor concentrations, whereas other variables were dependent on platelet and fibrinogen concentrations. Sample Hct strongly influenced the results of TEM, likely because RBCs act as a diluent for plasma coagulation factors. Thromboelastometry appeared to be affected by abnormalities of coagulation factors, platelet concentrations, and RBC mass. In samples from anemic patients, results of TEM indicative of hypercoagulability may be artifactual because of low RBC mass.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine effects of IV transfusion with fresh (3-day-old) or stored (35-day-old) autologous erythrocyte concentrate on serum labile iron concentration, iron-binding capacity, and protein interaction with iron in dogs.

ANIMALS 10 random-source healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive autologous erythrocyte concentrate stored for 3 days (n = 5) or 35 days (5). One unit of whole blood was collected from each dog, and erythrocyte concentrates were prepared and stored as assigned. After erythrocyte storage, IV transfusion was performed, with dogs receiving their own erythrocyte concentrate. Blood samples were collected from each dog before and 5, 9, 24, 48, and 72 hours after transfusion. Serum was harvested for measurement of total iron, labile iron, transferrin, ferritin, hemoglobin, and haptoglobin concentrations.

RESULTS For dogs that received fresh erythrocytes, serum concentrations of the various analytes largely remained unchanged after transfusion. For dogs that received stored erythrocytes, serum concentrations of total iron, labile iron, hemoglobin, and ferritin increased markedly and serum concentrations of transferrin and haptoglobin decreased after transfusion.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Transfusion with autologous erythrocyte concentrate stored for 35 days resulted in evidence of intravascular hemolysis in healthy dogs. The associated marked increases in circulating concentrations of free iron and hemoglobin have the potential to adversely affect transfusion recipients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the predominant thromboxane (TX) metabolite in urine of healthy cats, evaluate whether the method of sample collection would impact concentration of that metabolite, and propose a reference interval for that metabolite in urine of healthy cats.

ANIMALS 17 cats (11 purpose-bred domestic shorthair cats, 5 client-owned domestic shorthair cats, and 1 client-owned Persian cat).

PROCEDURES All cats were deemed healthy on the basis of results for physical examination, a CBC, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, and measurement of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Voided and cystocentesis urine samples (or both) were collected. Aliquots of urine were stored at −80°C until analysis. Concentrations of TXB2, 11-dehydroTXB2, and 2,3 dinorTXB2 were measured with commercially available ELISA kits. Urinary creatinine concentration was also measured.

RESULTS 11-dehydroTXB2 was the most abundant compound, representing (mean ± SD) 59 ± 18% of the total amount of TX detected. In all samples, the concentration of 11-dehydroTXB2 was greater than that of 2,3 dinorTXB2 (mean, 4.2 ± 2.7-fold as high). Mean concentration of 11-dehydroTXB2 for the 17 cats was 0.57 ± 0.47 ng/mg of creatinine. A reference interval (based on the 5% to 95% confidence interval) of 0.10 to 2.1 ng of 11-dehydroTXB2/mg of creatinine was proposed for healthy cats.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, 11-dehydroTXB2 was the major TX metabolite in feline urine. Measurement of this metabolite may represent a noninvasive, convenient method for monitoring in vivo platelet activation in cats at risk for thromboembolism.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the mechanisms by which corticosteroid administration may predispose cats to congestive heart failure (CHF).

Animals—12 cats receiving methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) for the treatment of dermatologic disorders.

Procedure—The study was conducted as a repeated-measures design. Various baseline variables were measured, after which MPA (5 mg/kg, IM) was administered. The same variables were then measured at 3 to 6 days and at 16 to 24 days after MPA administration. Evaluations included physical examination, systolic blood pressure measurement, hematologic analysis, serum biochemical analysis, thoracic radiography, echocardiography, and total body water and plasma volume determination.

Results—MPA resulted in a substantial increase in serum glucose concentration at 3 to 6 days after administration. Concurrently, RBC count, Hct, and hemoglobin concentration as well as serum concentrations of the major extracellular electrolytes, sodium and chloride, decreased. Plasma volume increased by 13.4% (> 40% in 3 cats), whereas total body water and body weight slightly decreased. All variables returned to baseline by 16 to 24 days after MPA administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These data suggest that MPA administration in cats causes plasma volume expansion as a result of an intra to extracellular fluid shift secondary to glucocorticoid-mediated extracellular hyperglycemia. This mechanism is analogous to the plasma volume expansion that accompanies uncontrolled diabetes mellitus in humans. Any cardiovascular disorders that impair the normal compensatory mechanisms for increased plasma volume may predispose cats to CHF following MPA administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine changes in dimensions of feline skin samples as a result of histologic processing and to identify factors that contributed to changes in dimensions of skin samples after sample collection.

SAMPLE Cadavers of 12 clinically normal cats.

PROCEDURES Skin samples were obtained bilaterally from 3 locations (neck, thorax, and tibia) of each cadaver; half of the thoracic samples included underlying muscle. Length, width, and depth were measured at 5 time points (before excision, after excision, after application of ink to mark tissue margins, after fixation in neutral-buffered 10% formalin for 36 hours, and after completion of histologic processing and staining with H&E stain). Measurements obtained after sample collection were compared with measurements obtained before excision.

RESULTS At the final time point, tissue samples had decreased in length (mean decrease, 32.40%) and width (mean decrease, 34.21%) and increased in depth (mean increase, 54.95%). Tissue from the tibia had the most shrinkage in length and width and that from the neck had the least shrinkage. Inclusion of underlying muscle on thoracic skin samples did not affect the degree of change in dimensions.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, each step during processing from excision to formalin fixation and histologic processing induced changes in tissue dimensions, which were manifested principally as shrinkage in length and width and increase in depth. Most of the changes occured during histologic processing. Inclusion of muscle did not affect thoracic skin shrinkage. Shrinkage should be a consideration when interpreting surgical margins in clinical cases. 945)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate canine erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) for the presence of procoagulant phospholipid (PPL), determine whether PPL concentration changes during the course of storage of ECs, and ascertain whether prestorage leukoreduction (removal of leukocytes via gravity filtration) reduces the development of PPL.

SAMPLE 10 whole blood units (420 g each) collected from 10 random-source, clinically normal dogs (1 U/dog).

PROCEDURES The dogs were randomized to 1 of 2 groups. Of the 10 whole blood units collected, 5 were processed through a standard method, and 5 underwent leukoreduction. Whole blood units were processed to generate ECs, from which aliquots were aseptically collected from each unit weekly for 5 weeks. Supernatants from the concentrates were evaluated for procoagulant activity, which was converted to PPL concentration, by use of an automated assay and by measurement of real-time thrombin generation.

RESULTS Supernatants from stored canine ECs contained procoagulant activity as measured by both assays. In general, the PPL concentration gradually increased during the storage period, but leukoreduction reduced the development of increased procoagulant activity over time.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The presence of PPL in canine ECs may be associated with procoagulant and proinflammatory effects in vivo, which could have adverse consequences for dogs treated with ECs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research