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  • Author or Editor: Simon T. Kudnig x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 9-year-old sexually intact male Staffordshire Bull Terrier and a 9-year-old neutered male Boxer were evaluated for intermittent neurologic signs including muscle tremors, ataxia, episodic collapse, disorientation, and seizures.

Clinical Findings—Both dogs had low blood glucose and high serum insulin concentrations. Results of abdominal ultrasonography were unremarkable for both dogs. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a mass that extended from the body of the pancreas into the pancreaticoduodenal vein in each dog.

Treatment and Outcome—Marginal resection of pancreatic masses was performed, and tumor thrombi were removed via venotomy in both dogs. Histologic evaluation indicated the masses were pancreatic islet cell tumors with tumor thrombi. Clinical signs resolved following surgical resection of tumors and tumor thrombi, and the dogs were euglycemic during the follow-up period (17 and 45 months after surgery).

Clinical Relevance—Although gross tumor thrombus formation has been identified in humans with insulinomas, tumor thrombi have not been previously reported for dogs with insulinomas. Surgical removal of tumor thrombi via venotomy seemed to be well tolerated by the dogs. Tumor thrombus formation did not seem to adversely affect prognosis for the 2 dogs of this report.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of one-lung ventilation on oxygen delivery in anesthetized dogs with an open thoracic cavity.

Animals—8 clinically normal adult Walker Hound dogs.

Procedure—Each dog was anesthetized and subjected to one-lung ventilation during a period when it had an open thoracic cavity. A Swan-Ganz catheter was used to measure hemodynamic variables and obtain mixed-venous blood samples. A catheter was inserted in the dorsal pedal artery to measure arterial pressure and obtain arterial blood samples. Oxygen delivery index was calculated and used to assess effects of one-lung ventilation on cardiopulmonary function. Effects on hemodynamic and pulmonary variables were analyzed.

Results—One-lung ventilation caused significant decreases in PaO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), mixed-venous oxygen saturation, and arterial oxygen content (CaO2). One-lung ventilation caused significant increases in PaCO2, physiologic dead space, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference. Changes in SaO2, CaO2, and PaCO2, although significantly different, were not considered to be of clinical importance. One-lung ventilation induced a significant increase in pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and shunt fraction. One-lung ventilation did not have a significant effect on cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, pulmonary vascular resistance index, and oxygen delivery index.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—One-lung ventilation affected gas exchange and hemodynamic function, although oxygen delivery in clinically normal dogs was not affected during a period with an open thoracic cavity. One-lung ventilation can be used safely in healthy dogs with an open thoracic cavity during surgery. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:443–448)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects on oxygen delivery (DO2) of 2.5 and 5 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) applied to the dependent lung during one-lung ventilation (OLV) in anesthetized dogs with a closed thoracic cavity.

Animals—7 clinically normal adult Walker Hound dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized, and catheters were inserted in a dorsal pedal artery and the pulmonary artery. Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and data were collected during OLV (baseline), after application of 2.5 cm H2O of PEEP for 15 minutes during OLV, and after application of 5 cm H2O of PEEP for 15 minutes during OLV. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were analyzed and calculations performed to obtain DO2, and values were compared among the various time points by use of an ANOVA for repeated measures.

Results—PEEP induced a significant decrease in shunt fraction that resulted in a significant increase in arterial oxygen saturation. However, it failed to significantly affect arterial oxygen content (CaO2) or cardiac output. Thus, DO2 was not affected in healthy normoxemic dogs as a net result of the application of PEEP.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The use of PEEP during OLV in anesthetized dogs with a closed thoracic cavity did not affect DO2. Use of PEEP during OLV in dogs with a closed thoracic cavity is recommended because it does not affect cardiac output and any gain in CaO2 will be beneficial for DO2 in critically ill patients. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:978–983)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of one-lung ventilation (OLV) on oxygen delivery (DO2) in anesthetized dogs with a closed thoracic cavity.

Animals—7 clinically normal adult Walker Hound dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized. Catheters were inserted in a dorsal pedal artery and the pulmonary artery. Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency. Data were collected at baseline (PaCO2 of 35 to 45 mm Hg), during two-lung ventilation, and 15 minutes after creating OLV. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables were analyzed and calculations performed to obtain DO2 , and values were compared among the various time points by use of an ANOVA for repeated measures.

Results—OLV induced a significant augmentation of shunt fraction that resulted in a significant reduction in PaO2, arterial oxygen saturation, and arterial oxygen content. Cardiac index was not significantly changed. The net result was that DO2 was not significantly affected by OLV.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of OLV in healthy dogs does not induce significant changes in DO2, which is the ultimate variable to use when evaluating tissue oxygenation. One-lung ventilation can be initiated safely in dogs before entering the thoracic cavity during surgery. Additional studies are necessary to evaluate OLV in clinically affected patients and variations in age, body position, and type of anesthetic protocol. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:973–977)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate risk factors associated with death and development of perioperative complications in dogs undergoing surgery for treatment of gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—166 dogs.

Procedures—Records of dogs with confirmed GDV that underwent surgery were reviewed. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with development of complications (ie, hypotension, arrhythmias, gastric necrosis necessitating gastrectomy, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peritonitis, sepsis, postoperative dilatation, postoperative vomiting, and incisional problems) and with short-term outcome (ie, died vs survived to the time of suture removal).

Results—Short-term mortality rate was 16.2% (27/166). Risk factors significantly associated with death prior to suture removal were clinical signs for > 6 hours prior to examination, combined splenectomy and partial gastrectomy, hypotension at any time during hospitalization, peritonitis, sepsis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Partial gastrectomy was not a significant risk factor for death but was for peritonitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, sepsis, and arrhythmias. Age, gastrectomy, and disseminated intravascular coagulation were risk factors for development of hypotension. Use of a synthetic colloid or hypertonic saline solution was associated with a significantly decreased risk of hypotension.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the prognosis for dogs undergoing surgery because of GDV is good but that certain factors are associated with an increased risk that dogs will develop perioperative complications or die.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association