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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To establish reference values for electrodiagnostic evaluation of peripheral nerve function in birds.

Animals—6 rheas and 6 barred owls.

Procedure—Birds were anesthetized with propofol or isoflurane in oxygen. Using a computer-based electromyograph system and needle electrodes for stimulation and recording, electromyography (EMG) was performed on the pectoral, biceps brachialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, and evoked EMG was performed on the tibial and ulnar nerves. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was calculated. Repetitive stimulation was performed on these 2 nerves. Late F waves were recorded for each nerve, when possible.

Results—Activity was evident during insertion of the electrodes, but muscles tested were electrically quiescent after spontaneous EMG. Motor nerve conduction velocity was faster in the tibial nerve than ulnar nerve but did not differ significantly between species. Mean ± SEM MNCV was 132.3 ±± 7.8 m/s for the tibial nerve and 59.7 ± 7.8 m/s for the ulnar nerve. A significant difference was not observed in responses at the fourth or ninth stimulation during repetitive stimulation. Subsequent to the initial stimulation, amplitudes were ± 22.7% of the initial motor potential amplitude. Recorded F waves were inconsistent, which may have been associated with technique.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Reference range (mean ± 2 SEM) for MNCV was 34.1 to 75.3 m/s for the ulnar nerve and 116.7 to 147.9 m/s for the tibial nerve in barred owls and rheas. After repetitive stimulation, motor potential amplitudes may be ± 22.7% of the initial amplitude response. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:469–472)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To measure concentrations of glutamate, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine in CSF of dogs with experimentally induced subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to assess effects of cyclosporine and simvastatin on these concentrations.

Sample—CSF samples from 13 dogs.

Procedures—In a previous study, SAH was induced in dogs via 2 injections of autologous blood into the cerebellomedullary cistern 24 hours apart. Dogs were untreated (control; n = 5) or received simvastatin alone (4) or simvastatin in combination with cyclosporine (4). Samples of CSF were collected before the first blood injection (baseline; time 0), before the second blood injection, and on days 3, 7, and 10. For the study reported here, neurotransmitter concentrations in CSF were analyzed via high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were analyzed with a repeated-measures model with adjustments for multiple comparisons by use of the Tukey method.

Results—In control dogs, the glutamate concentration peaked on day 3 and there was a significant increase in GABA and glutamate concentrations. Glutamate concentrations were significantly lower and glycine concentrations significantly higher on day 3 after administration of simvastatin alone or simvastatin in combination with cyclosporine, compared with concentrations for the control group. No significant differences in GABA and aspartate concentrations were detected among treatment groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Glutamate concentrations were increased in the CSF of dogs with SAH. Simvastatin administration attenuated high glutamate concentrations. A combination of immunosuppression and upregulation of nitric oxide synthase may be useful in lowering high glutamate concentrations in ischemic CNS conditions.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether plasma concentrations of benzodiazepines (BDZ) in dogs following intranasal (IN) administration of diazepam are comparable to concentrations following IV administration.

Animals—6 (4 male, 2 female) healthy adult Greyhounds.

Procedure—Dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 3 dogs in a crossover design. Diazepam (0.5 mg/kg of body weight) was administered intravenously to dogs in group 1 and intranasally to dogs in group 2. Blood was collected from the jugular vein of each dog into tubes containing lithium heparin before and 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 30, 60, 120, 240, and 480 minutes following diazepam administration. After a 4-day washout period, dogs in group 1 received diazepam intranasally, dogs in group 2 received diazepam intravenously, and blood was again collected. Plasma concentration of BDZ was determined by use of a fluorescence polarization immunoassay.

Results—Mean (± SD) peak plasma concentration of BDZ following IV administration (1316 ± 216 µg/L) was greater than that following IN administration (448 ± 41 µg/L). Time to peak concentration was ≤ 3 minutes following IV administration and 4.5 ± 1.5 minutes following IN administration. Mean bioavailability of BDZ following IN administration was 80 ± 9%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Diazepam is rapidly and efficiently absorbed following IN administration of the parenteral formulation. Plasma concentrations match or exceed the suggested therapeutic concentration (300 µg/L). Intranasal administration of diazepam may be useful for treatment of seizures in dogs by owners or when intravenous access is not readily available. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:651–654)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the protein and cellular composition of CSF in healthy adult ferrets.

Animals—42 clinically normal adult ferrets.

Procedure—CSF samples were collected from the cerebellomedullary cistern of anesthetized ferrets by use of disposable 25-gauge, 1.6-cm-long hypodermic needles. Samples were processed within 20 minutes after collection. The number of WBCs and RBCs per microliter of CSF was counted by use of a hemacytometer. The total protein concentration was determined by use of an automated chemistry analyzer.

Results—Total WBC counts (range, 0 to 8 cells/µL; mean, 1.59 cells/µL) in CSF of ferrets were similar to reference range values obtained for CSF from other species. Twenty-seven CSF samples had < 100 RBCs/µL (mean, 20.3 RBCs/µL). A small but significant effect of blood contamination on WBC counts was found between the 27 CSF samples with < 100 RBCs/µL and the remaining samples. Protein concentrations in CSF of ferrets (range, 28.0 to 68.0 mg/dL; mean, 31.4 mg/dL) were higher than has been reported for the CSF of dogs and cats. A significant effect of blood contamination on the CSF protein concentration was not found.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance— We have established reference range values for WBC counts and protein concentrations in CSF from healthy adult ferrets that may be useful in the clinical investigation of CNS disease. Results of our study indicate that the WBC count is significantly affected by blood contamination of the CSF sample. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:758–760)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 17-month-old 7-kg (15.4-lb) Shih Tzu was evaluated because of progressive thoracic limb weakness of 3 months' duration.

Clinical Findings—Neuroanatomic diagnosis was consistent with a lesion affecting the cervicothoracic (C6 through T2) spinal cord segments. Electrophysiologic testing revealed abnormal spontaneous activity in the thoracic limbs. Via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a lesion in the spinal cord that extended from the C5 through C7 vertebrae was detected, as were symmetric lesions in the cranial portion of the cervical spinal cord, caudal colliculi, and vestibular and cerebellar nuclei. Tests to detect metabolites indicative of inborn errors in metabolism revealed no abnormalities.

Treatment and Outcome—Prior to undergoing MR imaging, the dog received clindamycin (14 mg/kg [6.4 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h), trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (17 mg/kg [7.7 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h), and prednisone (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). Because of its deteriorating condition, the dog was euthanized. During necropsy, gross lesions were identified in the cervical spinal cord, caudal colliculi, and vestibular and cerebellar nuclei (corresponding to lesions detected via MR imaging). Microscopic evaluation of the brain and spinal cord revealed polioencephalomyelopathy; there was severe spongiosis of the neuropil with reactive astrocytes (many with high numbers of swollen mitochondria) and preservation of large neurons.

Clinical Relevance—The form of polioencephalomyelopathy in the Shih Tzu of this report was similar to that described for Australian Cattle dogs; the similarity of findings in dogs with those in humans with Leigh disease is suggestive of a mitochondrial defect.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the physiochemical properties and pharmacokinetics of 3 midazolam gel formulations following buccal administration to dogs.

ANIMALS 5 healthy adult hounds.

PROCEDURES In phase 1 of a 2-phase study, 2 gel formulations were developed that contained 1% midazolam in a poloxamer 407 (P1) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (H1) base and underwent rheological and in vitro release analyses. Each formulation was buccally administered to 5 dogs such that 0.3 mg of midazolam/kg was delivered. Each dog also received midazolam hydrochloride (0.3 mg/kg, IV). There was a 3-day interval between treatments. Blood samples were collected immediately before and at predetermined times for 8 hours after drug administration for determination of plasma midazolam concentration and pharmacokinetic analysis. During phase 2, a gel containing 2% midazolam in a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose base (H2) was developed on the basis of phase 1 results. That gel was buccally administered such that midazolam doses of 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg were delivered. Each dog also received midazolam (0.3 mg/kg, IV). All posttreatment procedures were the same as those for phase 1.

RESULTS The H1 and H2 formulations had lower viscosity, greater bioavailability, and peak plasma midazolam concentrations that were approximately 2-fold as high, compared with those for the P1 formulation. The mean peak plasma midazolam concentration for the H2 formulation was 187.0 and 106.3 ng/mL when the midazolam dose administered was 0.6 and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that buccal administration of gel formulations might be a viable alternative for midazolam administration to dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research