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  • Author or Editor: Simon L. Priestnall x
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History

A female Labrador Retriever Collie–cross puppy was born with 2 cutaneous masses on the ventral aspect of its abdomen and 2 symmetrical thickened plaques in the skin of the lumbar region. All 4 lesions grew noticeably between birth and euthanasia at 18 days of age. During the first 2 weeks after birth, the puppy was reportedly bright, nursed well, and gained weight; however, its condition deteriorated during the third week, leading to euthanasia (by means of IV injection of phenobarbital solution). Eighteen months later, the puppy's sire and dam and the remaining 9 littermates were clinically normal, and neither

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Clinical Findings

A 9-year-old 3.9-kg neutered male domestic shorthair cat was referred for investigation of a rapidly growing subcutaneous mass in the region of the left scapula. According to the referring veterinarian, the mass had been first noted 1 month earlier. At the referral examination, the cat was bright, alert, and responsive with a body condition score of 4/9. The cat's heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were within reference limits. The subcutaneous mass was located over the craniodorsal aspect of the left scapula, was freely mobile, and did not appear to be attached to the underlying

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 16-year-old sexually intact male Cocker Spaniel was referred for fluoroscopy and esophagogastroduodenoscopy to investigate a 6-week history of ptyalism and regurgitation. Gastrointestinal tract obstruction was suspected.

Clinical, Gross, and Cytologic Findings

At the referral evaluation, the dog was responsive and in good body condition (body condition score, 5/9). Two orthogonal radiographic views obtained by the referring veterinarian revealed a radiodense, well-demarcated, space-occupying mass within the cranial aspect of the thorax at the level of the T2-T4 vertebrae. The dog was anesthetized to perform fluoroscopic and upper GI endoscopic examination. The presence of a 4.1 × 2.5 × 3.1-cm,

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association