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Summary

The F waves evoked by supramaximal stimulation of distal tibial nerve were evaluated in chickens aged 2 to 15 weeks. Latency of these potentials increased from mean ± sd 11.4 ± 0.12 ms at week 2 to mean 12.88 ± 0.65 ms at week 15. The F-wave latency increased linearly with age. When this latency was corrected for a standard distance to compensate for the increasing limb length with age, latency decreased with maturity.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Compound motor-nerve action potentials evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the proximal and distal aspects of the tibial nerve were evaluated in chickens 1 to 15 weeks old. Motor-nerve conduction velocity increased from a mean of 22.6 m/s at week 1 to a mean of 52.7 m/s at week 15. The increase in conduction velocity was greatest for the first few weeks, and reached a plateau at 10 weeks Subcutaneous limb temperature, limb length, and proximal latency measurements also increased with age; however, distal latency measurements were not significantly influenced by age. A quadratic equation was calculated to predict mean motor-nerve conduction velocity for maturing chickens.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Muscle potentials evoked by stimulation of the sciatic nerve were evaluated in 4- and 15-week-old chickens. Each bird was anesthetized and slowly cooled externally from a normal body temperature of 40 C to 28 C, and motor nerve conduction velocities were measured at various intervals during cooling. Motor nerve conduction velocity decreased linearly with decreasing limb temperature in both groups. The rate of change in motor nerve conduction velocity per degree in 2 groups (2.13 m/s/C vs 1.84 m/s/ C) fell just short of a statistically significant difference (P = 0.0508), indicating that an age-related effect on temperature-associated variation in motor nerve conduction velocity may be present.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the items (question topics) for a subjective instrument to assess degenerative joint disease (DJD)–associated chronic pain in cats and determine the instrument design most appropriate for use by cat owners.

Animals—100 randomly selected client-owned cats from 6 months to 20 years old.

Procedures—Cats were evaluated to determine degree of radiographic DJD and signs of pain throughout the skeletal system. Two groups were identified: high DJD pain and low DJD pain. Owner-answered questions about activity and signs of pain were compared between the 2 groups to define items relating to chronic DJD pain. Interviews with 45 cat owners were performed to generate items. Fifty-three cat owners who had not been involved in any other part of the study, 19 veterinarians, and 2 statisticians assessed 6 preliminary instrument designs.

Results—22 cats were selected for each group; 19 important items were identified, resulting in 12 potential items for the instrument; and 3 additional items were identified from owner interviews. Owners and veterinarians selected a 5-point descriptive instrument design over 11-point or visual analogue scale formats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Behaviors relating to activity were substantially different between healthy cats and cats with signs of DJD-associated pain. Fifteen items were identified as being potentially useful, and the preferred instrument design was identified. This information could be used to construct an owner-based questionnaire to assess feline DJD-associated pain. Once validated, such a questionnaire would assist in evaluating potential analgesic treatments for these patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research