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  • Author or Editor: Shuji Suzuki x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of intervertebral distraction screw (IDS) fixation of the lumbosacral joint (LSJ) on the intervertebral foraminal area (IFA) and intervertebral stabilization of the LSJ and adjacent lumbar segments in dogs.

ANIMALS

7 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dorsal laminectomy was performed at the LSJ in each dog to expose the intervertebral disk. The IDS was then inserted into the L7-S1 disk. Computed tomography was performed before and after laminectomy and after IDS insertion (intact, laminectomy, and IDS conditions, respectively) to measure the intervertebral range of motion (ROM) and intervertebral distance (ID) at L7-S1, L6-7, and L5-6 with the LSJ in a flexed and extended position. The intervertebral foramina stenosis rate was calculated from the intervertebral foramina area in entrance, middle, and exit zones. Results were compared among conditions.

RESULTS

The ROM at L7-S1 after IDS insertion was lower than that observed before and after laminectomy; no other differences were identified among conditions. With the LSJ in the flexed position, the ID at L7-S1 was larger after IDS insertion than before and after laminectomy; no other differences in ID were identified. In all evaluated zones, the stenosis rate was lower after IDS insertion than before and after laminectomy. No differences in ROM, ID, and stenosis rate were identified among conditions at L6-7 or L5-6.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that IDS fixation of the LSJ restricted lumbosacral ROM and prevented decreases in lumbosacral ID and IFA in healthy dogs. There were no changes at L6-7 and L5-6.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To retrospectively evaluate the epidemiological and morphological features and outcome of surgical treatment of incomplete ossification of the dorsal neural arch of the atlas (IODA) in dogs with atlantoaxial instability (AAI).

ANIMALS 106 AAI-affected dogs that underwent ventral fixation of the atlantoaxial joint.

PROCEDURES Medical records and CT images for each dog were reviewed. Dogs were allocated to 1 of 2 groups on the basis of the presence or absence of IODA or of dens abnormalities (DAs) in CT images.

RESULTS Of the 106 dogs with AAI, 75 had and 31 did not have IODA; 70 had and 36 did not have DAs. Incomplete ossification was present in the cranialmost, central, or caudalmost portion of the dorsal neural arch of the atlas in 59, 39, and 28 dogs, respectively; 2 or 3 portions were affected in 29 and 11 dogs, respectively. The mean CT value (in Hounsfield units) for the midline of the dorsal neural arch of the atlas in dogs with IODA was significantly lower than that for the same site in the dogs without IODA. The mean age at surgery for dogs with central IODA was significantly higher than that of the non-IODA group. The severity of spinal cord injury before or after atlantoaxial ventral fixation did not differ between the IODA and non-IODA groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that concomitant DAs or IODA is common in dogs with AAI. In dogs with incomplete ossification in the central part of the dorsal neural arch of the atlas, surgical treatment of AAI generally occurs at a middle to advanced age.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To retrospectively review the efficacy of combined surgery comprising dorsal laminectomy and dorsal fixation using screws and polymethylmethacrylate as treatment for dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS).

ANIMALS

21 client owned dogs diagnosed with DLSS and treated surgically.

PROCEDURES

Based on clinical records, signalments, clinical signs, findings from orthopedic and neurological examinations, imaging findings, and postoperative complications were evaluated at the following time points: preoperatively, postoperatively, and 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery.

RESULTS

In all 21 cases, clinical signs were alleviated, proprioceptive deficits were improved from 3 months after surgery, and no recurrence of clinical signs was observed during the observation period. Minor complications were observed in 6 cases (28.6%), including implant failure in 2 (9.5%), delayed healing of surgical wounds in 2 (9.5%), seroma in 1 (4.8%), and swelling of the affected area in 1 (4.8%). There was no case with major complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Combined surgery comprising dorsal laminectomy and dorsal fixation using screws and polymethylmethacrylate is a useful treatment that can improve long-term clinical signs in dogs with DLSS.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association