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  • Author or Editor: Sheryl P. Gow x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a combination modified-live bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine can stimulate protective immunity in young BRSV-seropositive calves following intranasal (IN) administration.

Design—Controlled challenge study.

Animals—66 Holstein bull calves, 3 to 8 days old.

Procedures—In experiment 1, BRSV-seropositive and -seronegative calves were vaccinated IN with a commercially available combination modified-live virus vaccine formulated for SC administration; calves underwent BRSV challenge 4.5 months later. In experiment 2, BRSV-seronegative calves were vaccinated IN or SC (to examine the effect of route of administration) with the same combination vaccine that instead had a 1/100 dose of BRSV (to examine the effect of dose); calves underwent BRSV challenge 21 days later.

Results—In experiment 1, BRSV challenge resulted in severe respiratory tract disease with low arterial partial pressures of oxygen and lung lesions in most calves from all groups. Maximum change in rectal temperature was significantly greater in seropositive IN vaccinated calves, compared with seronegative IN vaccinated and seropositive control calves. Number of days of BRSV shedding was significantly lower in seronegative IN vaccinated calves than in seropositive IN vaccinated and seropositive control calves. In experiment 2, maximum change in rectal temperature was significantly greater in seronegative control calves, compared with seronegative IN and SC vaccinated calves. Shedding of BRSV was significantly reduced in seronegative IN and SC vaccinated calves, compared with control calves; also, lung lesions were reduced in seronegative IN and SC vaccinated calves.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Maternal antibodies may inhibit priming of protective responses by IN delivered BRSV vaccines.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a combination modified-live bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine could stimulate protective immunity in young BRSV-seropositive calves following intranasal administration and determine the duration of clinical immunity.

Design—Controlled challenge study.

Animals—84 dairy calves (3 to 11 days old).

Procedures—Responses to BRSV challenge of seronegative calves vaccinated under licensing trial conditions were compared with those of seropositive calves 2 times after vaccination. In experiment 1, young BRSV-seronegative calves were vaccinated intranasally with a minimum immunizing dose of BRSV and challenged with BRSV approximately 7 weeks later. In experiments 2 and 3, young BRSV-seropositive calves were vaccinated intranasally with a commercially available combination modified-live virus vaccine containing the commercial dose of the BRSV fraction and challenged with BRSV 9 weeks or approximately 14 weeks later, respectively.

Results—In experiments 1 and 2, BRSV-vaccinated calves had significantly higher Pao 2, significantly fewer lung lesions, and significantly lower mortality rate than did unvaccinated calves subsequent to BRSV challenge. In contrast, in experiment 3, there were no differences in Pao 2, lung lesions, or mortality rate between vaccinated and control calves after BRSV challenge approximately 14 weeks after vaccination. Protected calves in experiment 1 consistently had significant anamnestic mucosal and systemic antibody responses after challenge, whereas in experiments 2 and 3, antibody responses after challenge were more variable.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A combination BRSV vaccine administered intranasally to young calves induced protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies. The duration of immune responses induced by intranasal vaccination was short (≤ 4 months). Boosting immunity iatrogenically, or by natural exposure, is probably required to obtain optimal responses to neonatal intranasal vaccination.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a combination viral vaccine containing a modified-live bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) would protect calves from infection with virulent field strains of BHV-1 for weeks or months after vaccination.

Design—Randomized controlled trial, performed in 2 replicates.

Animals—63 weaned 4- to 6-month-old crossbred beef calves seronegative for antibody against BHV-1.

Procedures—Calves were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups. Control calves (n = 10/replicate) received a combination modified-live mixed viral vaccine without BHV-1, and treatment calves (20 and 23/replicate) received a combination modified-live mixed viral vaccine containing BHV-1. Each group was challenged via aerosol with 1 of 2 field strains of BHV-1, 30 days after vaccination in replicate 1 and 97 days after vaccination in replicate 2. After challenge, calves were commingled in 1 drylot pen. Clinical signs, immune responses, and nasal shedding of virus were monitored for 10 days after challenge, after which the calves were euthanatized and tracheal lesions were assessed.

Results—Vaccination stimulated production of BHV-1–specific IgG antibody that cross-neutralized several field and laboratory strains of BHV-1. Challenge with both field strains of BHV-1 resulted in moderate to severe respiratory tract disease in control calves. Treatment calves had significantly fewer signs of clinical disease, shed less BHV-1, had less or no weight loss after challenge, and had fewer tracheal lesions than control calves for at least 97 days after vaccination.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of the combination modified-live BHV-1 vaccine yielded significant disease-sparing effects in calves experimentally infected with virulent field strains of BHV-1.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association