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  • Author or Editor: Shelley J. Newman x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate completeness of excision and clinical outcome in dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) excised with a lateral margin of 2 cm and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—16 client-owned dogs with 1 or more cutaneous MCTs.

Procedure—Excision of MCTs was performed with a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane. Histologic tumor grading was performed; surgical margins were categorized as complete or incomplete. Follow-up information was obtained via repeat examination of the dogs by veterinarians or client-completed questionnaires.

Results—4 grade I and 19 grade II cutaneous MCTs were evaluated. Overall, 21 (91%) MCTs were completely excised; 2 grade II tumors had foci of mast cells at the 2-cm margin. Two dogs received adjunctive treatments following surgery. Follow-up information was available for all dogs (median follow-up period, 379 days; range, 51 to 538 days); no local recurrence was detected during this time. De novo MCTs were detected in 3 of 16 dogs at 37, 54, and 154 days after surgery. Via Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival time and disease-free interval were both > 538 days (medians not yet reached). No prognostic variables were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Excision with a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane may result in satisfactory excision of grades I and II MCTs in dogs, with recurrence rates similar to those reported previously. Use of these margins may minimize complications associated with larger local tumor resection.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether neoplastic mast cells extended into tissue 1, 2, or 3 cm laterally or deeper than 1 fascial plane from the visible edge of cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—21 client-owned dogs with ≥ 1 cutaneous MCT.

Procedures—After preparation for surgery, each dog's skin was marked 1, 2, and 3 cm from the tumor edge at 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°. At each 3-cm mark, deep fascia was exposed and sutured to the skin; the tumor was excised in routine fashion and fixed in formalin. Tumors were graded; margins were examined histologically for neoplastic mast cells.

Results—23 cutaneous MCTs in 21 dogs were included in this study. Fifteen (65%) tumors were located on the trunk, 5 (22%) on the hind limbs, and 3 (13%) on the head and neck. There were 3 (13%) grade-I and 20 (87%) grade-II tumors. All grade-I tumors were completely excised at all margins. Seventy-five percent of the grade-II tumors were completely excised at the 1- cm margin, and 100% were completely excised at the 2-cm margin. Two grade-II MCTs located on the hind limbs of dogs were excised with a complete but close (within 1 mm) deep margin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a 2-cm lateral margin and a deep margin of 1 fascial plane appear to be adequate for complete excision of grade-I and -II MCTs in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:236–240)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the specificity of a canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPSL) assay for diagnosing pancreatitis in dogs without clinical or histologic evidence of the disease.

Animals—20 dogs from another study with macroscopic evidence of pancreatitis and 44 dogs surrendered for euthanasia or expected to die.

Procedures—Prior to death, physical examination of each dog was performed and blood samples were collected for serum biochemical, serum cPSL, and hematologic analyses. After death, the pancreas was removed, sectioned in 1- to 2-cm slices, and evaluated by a pathologist. Dogs were classified by whether they had clinical or macroscopic pancreatitis. Each pancreatic section was histologically examined, and mean cumulative scores (MCSs) were assigned for 8 histologic characteristics. For each characteristic, comparisons were made between dogs with and without pancreatitis to establish histologic criteria for lack of evidence of pancreatitis.

Results—For all histologic characteristics except lymphocytic infiltration, the median MCS differed significantly between dogs with and without pancreatitis. Dogs were categorized as having no histologic evidence of pancreatitis when the MCSs for neutrophilic infiltration, pancreatic necrosis, peripancreatic fat necrosis, and edema were 0.0. On the basis of these criteria, 40 dogs were classified as having no evidence of pancreatitis. The cPSL concentration was within reference limits in 38 of these 40 dogs and was less than the cutoff value for diagnosing pancreatitis (400 μg/L) in 39 of the 40 dogs, resulting in a specificity of 97.5% (95% confidence interval, 86.8% to 99.9%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The cutoff cPSL value used in this study may be useful for diagnosing pancreatitis in dogs with a lack of histologic lesions consistent with pancreatitis and for which pancreatitis is not considered a major differential diagnosis.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research