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  • Author or Editor: Sheldon Padgett x
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Abstract

Objective—To identify variables associated with prognosis in dogs undergoing surgical excision of anal sac apocrine gland adenocarcinomas (ASACs) with and without adjunctive chemotherapy.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—42 dogs with ASACs.

Procedures—Information on signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic procedures, surgical procedures, adjunctive therapies, survival time, and disease-free interval was obtained from the medical records.

Results—Survival time was significantly associated with the presence of sublumbar lymphadenopathy and sublumbar lymph node extirpation, with median survival time significantly shorter for dogs with sublumbar lymphadenopathy (hazard ratio, 2.31) than for those without and for dogs that underwent lymph node extirpation (hazard ratio, 2.31) than for those that did not. Disease-free interval was significantly associated with the presence of sublumbar lymphadenopathy, lymph node extirpation, and administration of platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents, with median disease-free interval significantly shorter for dogs with sublumbar lymphadenopathy (hazard ratio, 2.47) than for those without, for dogs that underwent lymph node extirpation (hazard ratio, 2.47) than for those that did not, and for dogs that received platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents (hazard ratio, 2.69) than for those that did not. Survival time and disease-free interval did not differ among groups when dogs were grouped on the basis of histopathologic margins (complete vs marginal vs incomplete excision).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in dogs with ASAC undergoing surgical excision, the presence of sublumbar lymphadenopathy and lymph node extirpation were both negative prognostic factors. However, completeness of surgical excision was not associated with survival time or disease-free interval.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association