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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate SC administration of 2 sedation protocols, ketamine-midazolam (KM) and alfaxalone-midazolam (AM), in African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

ANIMALS

9 healthy adult hedgehogs (5 males, 4 females).

PROCEDURES

A randomized, blinded, complete crossover study was performed. Sedation was induced by SC administration of either ketamine (30 mg/kg [14 mg/lb]) with midazolam (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb]) or alfaxalone (3 mg/kg [1.4 mg/lb]) with midazolam (1 mg/kg), including a 2-week washout period between treatments. Flumazenil (0.05 mg/kg [0.02 mg/lb], SC) was administered 45 minutes after administration of either protocol to reverse the effects of midazolam. Physiologic variables, reflexes, and behaviors were monitored. Food intake and body weight were measured before and after sedation.

RESULTS

Deep sedation characterized by complete loss of the righting reflex, decreased jaw tone, decreased pelvic limb withdrawal reflex, and preservation of the palpebral reflex was produced in 7 of 9 hedgehogs after KM administration and all 9 hedgehogs after AM administration. Mean ± SD time to loss of righting reflex was 6.4 ± 2.4 minutes after KM administration and 10 ± 4.0 minutes after AM administration. Following flumazenil administration, no significant difference was found in recovery time between sedation with KM (18.8 ± 12.7 minutes) and AM (14.4 ± 7.8 minutes). No significant differences were found in respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or body temperature between protocols, whereas heart rate was higher for sedation with KM. Both sedation protocols resulted in a transient reduction in food intake.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Subcutaneous administration of KM and AM provided deep sedation that might be useful to facilitate routine, noninvasive procedures in hedgehogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate and compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of SC ceftazidime administered at 20 and 40 mg/kg to red-eared sliders.

ANIMALS

8 adult red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

METHODS

In a sequential, 2-period study with a 3-week washout period between treatments, ceftazidime was administered SC to turtles at 20 and 40 mg/kg. Blood samples were collected from the subcarapacial sinus at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after ceftazidime administration. Plasma ceftazidime concentrations were quantified using reversed-phase HPLC.

RESULTS

Mean plasma half-life after 20- and 40-mg/kg dosing was 39.75 ± 8.0 hours and 33.03 ± 6.56 hours, respectively. Mean maximum plasma concentration after 20- and 40-mg/kg dosing was 71.0 ± 15.93 µg/mL and 120.0 ± 30.62 µg/mL, respectively. Mean plasma ceftazidime concentrations remained ≥ 8 µg/mL, the theoretical MIC for various reptile pathogens for all time points.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicate that ceftazidime dosed at either 20 or 40 mg/kg produces plasma concentrations exceeding the theoretical MIC of various reptile pathogens for at least 120 hours. An ideal dosing interval could not be determined, as all plasma concentrations remained above the threshold of interest for all time points. Follow-up studies should focus on establishing a dosing interval and more rigorous monitoring for potential adverse effects.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine an optimal ceftazidime dosing strategy in Northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) by evaluation of 2 different doses administered SC and 1 dose administered transcutaneously.

ANIMALS

44 Northern leopard frogs (including 10 that were replaced).

PROCEDURES

Ceftazidime was administered to frogs SC in a forelimb at 20 mg/kg (n = 10; SC20 group) and 40 mg/kg (10; SC40 group) or transcutaneously on the cranial dorsum at 20 mg/kg (10; TC20 group). Two frogs in each ceftazidime group were euthanized 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after drug administration. Plasma, renal, and skin concentrations of ceftazidime were measured by means of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Four control frogs were used for assay validation.

RESULTS

Mean plasma half-life of ceftazidime in the SC20, SC40, and TC20 groups was 9.01 hours, 14.49 hours, and too low to determine, respectively. Mean maximum plasma ceftazidime concentration was 92.9, 96.0, and 1.3 μg/mL, respectively. For 24 hours after drug administration in the SC20 and SC40 groups, plasma ceftazidime concentration exceeded 8 μg/mL. Renal and skin concentrations were detectable at both doses and routes of administration; however, skin concentrations were significantly lower than renal and plasma concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that ceftazidime administration to Northern leopard frogs at 20 mg/kg, SC, every 24 hours would achieve a plasma concentration exceeding the value considered effective against common amphibian pathogens. Transcutaneous administration of the injectable ceftazidime formulation at 20 mg/kg warrants further investigation but is not currently recommended because of a potential lack of efficacy.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association