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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 2.8-kg (6.1-lb) 4-month-old sexually intact female domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of bilateral, subcutaneous lumbar masses that were presumed to be the kidneys.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination findings included 2 mobile, nonpainful, 3×3-cm, bilaterally symmetric masses in the dorsolateral lumbar region. Abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, and CT confirmed bilateral body wall defects with renal herniation. Serum biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and excretory urography confirmed normal renal function.

Treatment and Outcome—Exploratory laparotomy, reduction of the kidneys, repair of the body wall defects, bilateral nephropexy, and ovariohysterectomy were performed. There were no perioperative complications.

Clinical Relevance—Lumbar hernia has not been reported previously in a cat. It is important for veterinarians to be aware that although rare, lumbar hernia should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for a lumbar mass or signs of chronic lumbar pain in cats.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and MRI for diagnosing medial meniscal lesions in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) deficiency.

DESIGN Diagnostic test evaluation.

ANIMALS 26 dogs (31 stifle joints) with CCL deficiency.

PROCEDURES A single surgeon physically examined each dog and performed ultrasonography and arthroscopy of affected stifle joints to identify medial meniscal lesions. Video recordings of the arthroscopic procedure were saved and subsequently reviewed by the same surgeon and by a second surgeon working independently and blinded to results of all examinations. A radiologist blinded to results of all examinations evaluated MRI scans of the affected joints. Correct classification rate (CCR), sensitivity, and specificity of ultrasonography and MRI were calculated twice, with each of the 2 surgeons' arthroscopic assessments used as the reference standard.

RESULTS Compared with arthroscopic examination by the unblinded surgeon, ultrasonography had a CCR of 90%, sensitivity of 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73% to 100%), and specificity of 82% (95% CI, 48% to 97%). For MRI, these values were 84%, 75% (51% to 90%), and 100% (68% to 100%), respectively. Compared with arthroscopic assessment by the blinded surgeon, ultrasonography had a CCR of 84%, sensitivity of 86% (95% CI, 64% to 96%), and specificity of 78% (95% CI, 40% to 96%). For MRI, these values were 77%, 68% (45% to 82%), and 100% (63% to 100%), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These data suggested imperfect performance but clinical usefulness of both ultrasonography and MRI for diagnosing medial meniscal lesions in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 40.3-kg (88.7-lb) 6-year-old spayed female Labrador Retriever was evaluated because of acute unilateral epistaxis.

Clinical Findings—During the initial evaluation of the dog, systemic hypertension and a left adrenal gland mass were detected. The left adrenal gland mass was surgically removed; results of histologic examination of the mass indicated it was a pheochromocytoma. Ten months later, the dog was evaluated because of persistent systemic hypertension and development of polyuria, polydipsia, and excessive panting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a mass in the cranial aspect of the right adrenal gland; results of MRI suggested the mass was a malignant tumor.

Treatment and Outcome—Epistaxis resolved after treatment and resolution of severe systemic hypertension. A partial right adrenalectomy was performed to remove the right adrenal gland mass. Results of histologic examination of the mass indicated it was a well-differentiated carcinoma of the cortex of the adrenal gland. Results of ACTH stimulation tests after surgery indicated the dog had adequate adrenal gland function.

Clinical Relevance—Partial adrenalectomy may be a safe and feasible treatment option to preserve adrenal gland function in dogs with small eccentrically located adrenal gland masses, particularly for dogs that have undergone removal of the contralateral adrenal gland.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association