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History

A 2-year-old 4-kg (8.8-lb) spayed female Yorkshire Terrier was evaluated after being attacked by a wolf-dog hybrid. On physical examination, the patient was quiet, alert, and responsive. The dog had a rectal temperature of 37.9°C (100.2°F), a heart rate of 66 beats/min, and a respiratory rate of 48 breaths/min. No crackles or wheezes were apparent on auscultation of the thorax. The femoral pulses were weak and synchronous with a peripheral blood pressure of 80 mm Hg. Multiple puncture wounds were detected in the dorsolateral mid-abdominal region, bilaterally. The dog had signs of severe pain, particularly over the right-sided wounds.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

OBJECTIVE

To quantify 3-D femorotibial joint kinematics during ambulation in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture treated with lateral fabellotibial suture stabilization (LFTS).

ANIMALS

9 adult dogs (body weight, 15 to 35 kg [33 to 77 lb]) with unilateral complete CCL rupture.

PROCEDURES

Digital 3-D bone models of the femur and fabellae and tibia and fibula were created from CT scans. Lateral fluoroscopic images of stifle joints were collected during treadmill walking before surgery and 6 months after LFTS. The LFTS was performed with nylon leader material secured with knots. Gait cycles were analyzed with a 3-D to 2-D image registration process. Femorotibial joint kinematics (craniocaudal translation, internal-external rotation, and flexion and extension angles) were compared among CCL-deficient stifle joints before LFTS, CCL-deficient stifle joints 6 months after LFTS, and unaffected contralateral (control) stifle joints. Owners and veterinarians subjectively assessed lameness by use of a visual analog scale and gait examination, respectively, at each time point.

RESULTS

At midstance phase, medial cranial tibial translation decreased from 9.3 mm before LFTS to 7.6 mm after LFTS but remained increased when compared with control stifle joint values. Following LFTS, axial rotation and stifle joint flexion and extension angles were not significantly different from control stifle joints. On the owner survey, the median walking lameness score improved from 9.3 of 10 before surgery to 0.3 after surgery. On gait examination, median walking lameness score improved from 2 of 4 before surgery to 0 after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Stifle joint instability was only slightly mitigated at 6 months following LFTS performed with knotted nylon leader material in medium to large dogs with CCL rupture, despite improvement in lameness.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 4-month-old 14.9-kg sexually intact male Chinese Shar-Pei was presented for right hind limb lameness. The dog had been vaccinated against canine distemper virus, hepatitis virus, Leptospira, parvovirus, parainfluenza virus, rabies virus, and Bordetella spp 16 days prior to presentation and became toe-touching lame in the right hind limb 14 days prior to presentation. This lameness progressed to non–weight-bearing lameness and did not improve with a course of carprofen (2.5 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h for 5 days) initiated 8 days prior to presentation. One day prior to presentation, serum biochemical analyses and a CBC

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe veterinary house officers’ perceptions of dimensions of well-being during postgraduate training and to identify potential areas for targeted intervention.

SAMPLE

303 house officers.

PROCEDURES

A 62-item questionnaire was generated by use of an online platform and sent to house officers at participating institutions in October 2020. Responses were analyzed for trends and associations between selected variables.

RESULTS

239 residents, 45 rotating interns, and 19 specialty interns responded to the survey. The majority of house officers felt that their training program negatively interfered with their exercise habits, diet, and social engagement. House officers reported engaging in exercise significantly less during times of clinical responsibility, averaging 1.6 exercise sessions/wk (SD ± 0.8) on clinical duty and 2.4 exercise sessions/wk (SD ± 0.9) when not on clinical duty (P < 0.001). Ninety-four percent of respondents reported experiencing some degree of anxiety regarding their physical health, and 95% of house officers reported feeling some degree of anxiety regarding their current financial situation. Overall, 47% reported that their work-life balance was unsustainable for > 1 year; there was no association between specialty and sustainability of work-life balance. Most house officers were satisfied with their current training program, level of clinical responsibility, and mentorship.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Veterinary house officers demonstrated a poor balance between the demands of postgraduate training and maintenance of personal health. Thoughtful interventions are needed to support the well-being of veterinary house officers.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association