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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic hepatic biopsy in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—80 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent laparoscopic hepatic biopsy between 2004 and 2009 because of suspected hepatic disease were reviewed to obtain information on signalment, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and histologic diagnosis. Follow-up information was obtained through medical records and telephone conversations with owners.

Results—76 of the 80 (95%) dogs survived to hospital discharge. Three (4%) dogs required conversion to laparotomy, but in none of the dogs was conversion to laparotomy needed to control hemorrhage associated with the laparoscopic biopsy procedure. Another 3 (4%) dogs required a blood transfusion; all 3 had been anemic prior to surgery. All laparoscopic biopsy samples were considered to be of sufficient size and to contain a sufficient number of portal triads to obtain a histologic diagnosis. However, disagreements in histologic diagnoses were identified for 7 of the 49 (14%) dogs for which multiple slides were available for review.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that laparoscopic hepatic biopsy is a safe procedure in dogs, with low morbidity and mortality rates, that typically yields sufficient samples for histologic examination. However, because of the possibility of disagreement among histologic diagnoses, multiple samples should be obtained.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify preoperative predictors of survival and assess intraoperative and postoperative complications and survival rates for dogs undergoing adrenalectomy.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—41 dogs that underwent adrenalectomy.

Procedures—Records were reviewed to collect data regarding preoperative variables. Intraoperative and postoperative variables were also recorded. Variables were evaluated for association with survival duration via log-rank analysis for categoric variables and by use of Cox proportional hazards. Median survival times were calculated by use of Kaplan-Meier life table analysis.

Results—9 (22.0%) dogs did not survive to discharge. Intraoperative mortality rate was 4.8%. Overall Kaplan-Meier median survival time was 690 days. Variables significantly associated with shorter survival times included preoperative weakness or lethargy, thrombocytopenia, increased BUN concentration, increased partial thromboplastin time (PTT), increased aspartate transaminase (AST) activity, hypokalemia, intraoperative hemorrhage, and concurrent nephrectomy. Postoperative variables significantly associated with shorter survival times included pancreatitis and renal failure. In multivariate analysis, preoperative hypokalemia, preoperative increased BUN concentration, and concurrent nephrectomy were significantly associated with a shorter survival time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A high mortality rate was associated with adrenalectomy in dogs; however, those that survived until discharge from a hospital had long survival times. Preoperative factors associated with a shorter survival time were weakness or lethargy, thrombocytopenia, increased BUN concentration, increased PTT, increased AST activity, and hypokalemia. Studies are needed to evaluate how treatment for these factors may affect or change outcome after adrenalectomy. Dogs with adrenal masses that require concurrent nephrectomy and cause intraoperative hemorrhage have a guarded prognosis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of intracranial meningioma resection by use of a surgical aspirator and assess prognostic factors associated with intracranial meningiomas in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—17 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent resection of an intracranial meningioma by use of a surgical aspirator were reviewed. Information pertaining to signalment, imaging findings, clinical signs, duration of clinical signs, preoperative treatment, location of the tumor, results of histologic assessment, outcome, and necropsy results was obtained from the medical record. Clients and referring veterinarians were contacted via telephone for information on recurrence of clinical signs and postoperative survival time.

Results—16 dogs were > 7 years of age, and all 17 dogs had seizures before surgery. The most commonly affected breed was the Golden Retriever, represented by 6 of the 17 dogs. Median survival time was 1,254 days. Of the data collected, only histologic subtype of the tumor was prognostic. Analysis of survival times according to histologic tumor subtypes indicated that the order from most brief to longest was as follows: anaplastic, 0 days; fibroblastic, 10 days; psammomatous, > 313 days; meningothelial, > 523 days; and transitional, 1,254 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of a surgical aspirator to resect intracranial meningiomas in dogs was associated with longer survival times than those achieved with traditional surgery alone or traditional surgery combined with radiation therapy. Dogs with meningothelial, psammomatous, or transitional intracranial meningioma subtypes appeared to have a better prognosis than dogs with other subtypes of meningioma.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association