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  • Author or Editor: Scott J. Schatzberg x
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Abstract

Case Description—An 8-year-old Labrador Retriever with diabetes mellitus in which bilateral phacoemulsification had been performed 3 weeks earlier was evaluated for acute onset of blepharospasm, and a 7-year-old Miniature Schnauzer with chronic immune-mediated thrombocytopenia was reevaluated for keratoconjunctivitis sicca that had been diagnosed 4 weeks earlier.

Clinical Findings—Dendritic corneal ulcerations were detected in both dogs. Canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) was isolated from corneal swab specimens obtained during the initial evaluation of each dog and during recheck examinations performed until the ulcerations were healed. Canine herpesvirus-1 serum neutralization titers were detected in both dogs. Results of virus isolation from oropharyngeal and genital swab specimens were negative for both dogs. The isolated viruses were identified as CHV-1 via immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, PCR assay, and gene sequencing. Negative controls for PCR assay and virus isolation included conjunctival swab specimens from 50 dogs without extraocular disease and corneal swab specimens from 50 dogs with corneal ulcers, respectively.

Treatment and Outcome—Lesions resolved in both dogs after topical administration of idoxuridine or trifluridine and discontinuation of topically administered immunosuppressive medications.

Clinical Relevance—To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of corneal ulcerations associated with naturally occurring CHV-1 infection and may represent local ocular recrudescence of latent CHV-1 infection. The viruses isolated were identified as CHV-1, and the morphology, antigenicity, and genotype were similar to those for CHV-1 isolates obtained from a puppy that died from systemic CHV-1 infection.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum DNA in canine and feline biological samples.

Sample Population—Biological samples from 7 cats with systemic (n = 4) or CNS (3) toxoplasmosis, 6 dogs with neospora- or toxoplasma-associated encephalitis, and 11 animals with nonprotozoal disease.

Procedure—Primers for T gondii, N caninum, and the canine ferritin gene (dogs) or feline histone 3.3 gene (cats) were combined in a single PCR assay. The DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded brain tissue, CSF, or skeletal muscle. The PCR products with positive results were cloned, and sequence identity was confirmed.

Results—Of 7 cats and 4 dogs with immunohistochemical or serologic evidence of toxoplasmosis, PCR results were positive for all cats and 3 dogs for T gondii, and positive for T gondii and N caninum for 1 dog. Another dog had negative PCR results for both parasites. Of 2 dogs with immunohistochemical or serologic evidence of neosporosis, PCR results were positive for 1 for N caninum and positive for the other for T gondii. All negative-control samples yielded negative results for T gondii and N caninum on the PCR assay.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Standard tests for toxoplasmosis or neosporosis associated with the CNS rely on serologic, histologic, or immunohistochemical analysis and can be difficult to interpret. The multiplex PCR assay with built-in control reactions could be a complementary clinical tool for the antemortem diagnosis of toxoplasmosis or neosporosis associated with the CNS. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1507–1513)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine complications and neurologic outcomes associated with dexamethasone administration to dogs with surgically treated thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation, compared with dogs not receiving dexamethasone.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—161 dogs with surgically confirmed thoracolumbar disk herniation.

Procedures—Medical records from 2 hospitals were used to identify dogs that had received dexamethasone < 48 hours prior to admission (dexamethasone group dogs), dogs that received glucocorticoids other than dexamethasone < 48 hours prior to admission (other-glucocorticoid group dogs), and dogs that received no glucocorticoids (nontreatment group dogs). Signalment, neurologic injury grade, laboratory data, and complications were extracted from medical records.

Results—Dexamethasone group dogs were 3.4 times as likely to have a complication, compared with other-glucocorticoid or nontreatment group dogs. Dexamethasone group dogs were 11.4 times as likely to have a urinary tract infection and 3.5 times as likely to have diarrhea, compared with other-glucocorticoid or nontreatment group dogs. No differences in neurologic function at discharge or recheck evaluation were detected among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that treatment with dexamethasone before surgery is associated with more adverse effects, compared with treatment with glucocorticoids other than dexamethasone or no treatment with glucocorticoids, in dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation. In this study population, no difference in outcome was found among groups. These findings suggest that the value of dexamethasone administration before surgery in dogs with thoracolumbar disk herniation should be reconsidered.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 17-month-old 7-kg (15.4-lb) Shih Tzu was evaluated because of progressive thoracic limb weakness of 3 months' duration.

Clinical Findings—Neuroanatomic diagnosis was consistent with a lesion affecting the cervicothoracic (C6 through T2) spinal cord segments. Electrophysiologic testing revealed abnormal spontaneous activity in the thoracic limbs. Via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a lesion in the spinal cord that extended from the C5 through C7 vertebrae was detected, as were symmetric lesions in the cranial portion of the cervical spinal cord, caudal colliculi, and vestibular and cerebellar nuclei. Tests to detect metabolites indicative of inborn errors in metabolism revealed no abnormalities.

Treatment and Outcome—Prior to undergoing MR imaging, the dog received clindamycin (14 mg/kg [6.4 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h), trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (17 mg/kg [7.7 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h), and prednisone (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). Because of its deteriorating condition, the dog was euthanized. During necropsy, gross lesions were identified in the cervical spinal cord, caudal colliculi, and vestibular and cerebellar nuclei (corresponding to lesions detected via MR imaging). Microscopic evaluation of the brain and spinal cord revealed polioencephalomyelopathy; there was severe spongiosis of the neuropil with reactive astrocytes (many with high numbers of swollen mitochondria) and preservation of large neurons.

Clinical Relevance—The form of polioencephalomyelopathy in the Shih Tzu of this report was similar to that described for Australian Cattle dogs; the similarity of findings in dogs with those in humans with Leigh disease is suggestive of a mitochondrial defect.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—2 full-sibling male German Shorthaired Pointer (GSHP) puppies (dogs 1 and 2) with X-linked muscular dystrophy and deletion of the dystrophin gene (gene symbol, DMD) each had poor growth, skeletal muscle atrophy, pelvic limb weakness, episodic collapse, and episodes of coughing.

Clinical Findings—Initial examination revealed stunted growth, brachygnathism, trismus, and diffuse neuromuscular signs in each puppy; clinical signs were more severe in dog 2 than in dog 1. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a lack of dystrophin protein in both dogs. During the next 3 years, each dog developed hyperinflation of the lungs, hypertrophy of the cervical musculature, and hypertrophy of the lateral head of the triceps brachii muscle.

Treatment and Outcome—Monitoring and supportive care were provided at follow-up visits during an approximately 7-year period. No other specific treatment was provided. Neuromuscular signs in both dogs remained stable after 3 years of age, with dog 2 consistently more severely affected than dog 1. The dogs had multiple episodes of aspiration pneumonia; dogs 1 and 2 were euthanatized at 84 and 93 months of age, respectively.

Clinical Relevance—The clinical course of disease in these dogs was monitored for a longer period than has been monitored in previous reports of dystrophin-deficient dogs. The clinical progression of muscular dystrophy in the 2 GSHPs was compared with that for other breeds and species with dystrophin-deficient conditions, and the potential basis for the phenotypic variation observed between these littermates, along with potential therapeutic ramifications for dogs and humans, was evaluated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 10-month-old Boxer was evaluated for fever and signs of cervical pain.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed lethargy, fever, and mucopurulent ocular and preputial discharge. On neurologic examination, the gait was characterized by a short stride. The dog kept its head flexed and resisted movement of the neck, consistent with cervical pain. Clinicopathologic findings included neutrophilic leukocytosis, a left shift, and monocytosis. Cervical radiographs were unremarkable. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed neutrophilic pleocytosis and high total protein content. On the basis of signalment, history, and clinicopathologic data, a diagnosis of steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis was made.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog was treated with prednisone (3.2 mg/kg [1.45 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h), for 3 weeks with limited response. Consequently, azathioprine (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) was administered. Three weeks later, the dog was evaluated for tachypnea and lethargy. Complete blood count revealed leukopenia, neutropenia, and a left shift. Thoracic radiography revealed a diffuse bronchointerstitial pattern. The dog subsequently went into respiratory arrest and died. On histologic evaluation, amoebic organisms were observed in the lungs, kidneys, and meninges of the brain and spinal cord. A unique Acanthamoeba sp was identified by use of PCR assay.

Clinical Relevance—This dog developed systemic amoebic infection presumed to be secondary to immunosuppression. The development of secondary infection should be considered in animals undergoing immunosuppression for immune-mediated disease that develop clinical signs unrelated to the primary disease. Although uncommon, amoebic infection may develop in immunosuppressed animals. Use of a PCR assay for identification of Acanthamoeba spp may provide an antemortem diagnosis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association