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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 12 dogs with lesions of the brain (3 cats, 2 dogs) or vertebral canal (10 dogs) that underwent intraoperative ultrasonography were reviewed. Ultrasonography was performed after craniotomy, a ventral slot procedure, or laminectomy, using a real-time sector scanner with a 7.5- or 10-MHz transducer. In the 3 cats and 2 dogs with brain lesions, cerebral masses were hyperechoic, compared with normal brain, and were easily located. In the 2 dogs, ultrasonography was necessary to localize deep-seated cerebral lesions that could not be seen following craniotomy. In 7 dogs that underwent a ventral slot procedure because of prolapse of an intervertebral disk, ultrasonography was successfully used to assess completeness of disk removal. The remaining 3 dogs underwent dorsal laminectomy because intradural enlargement of the spinal cord (1 dog) or an intradural mass (2 dogs) could be seen myelographically. In the 2 dogs with intradural masses, intraoperative ultrasonography helped to delineate the extent of the tumor. In the third dog, spinal cord swelling was seen ultrasonographically; the histologic diagnosis was spinal cord edema.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Twenty-two dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma were treated by amputation (n = 17) or limb-sparing surgery (n = 5). All dogs were given cisplatin (60 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) at 3-week inervals, beginning 1 week after surgery. Number of cisplatin treatments ranged from 1 to 6. Survival data for the 22 dogs were compared with survival data from a historical control group consisting of 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone.

Median survival time for the 22 dogs given cisplatin was estimated to be 46.4 weeks, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 45.5 and 20.9%, respectively. Survival time was significantly (P < 0.0001) longer for treated dogs than for control dogs. Statistically significant relation was not found between survival time and number of cisplatin treatments.

Three dogs were alive with no evidence of disease at the time of reporting. Of the remaining 19 dogs, 14 (73.4%) were euthanatized for problems documented to be related to metastases. Nine (47.4%) dogs were euthanatized because of bone metastases, and 5 (26.3%) were euthanatized because of pulmonary metastases. The proportion of dogs euthanatized because of bone metastases was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher for treated than for control dogs. Median survival times for dogs developing bone and lung metastases were estimated to be 51.2 weeks and 21.2 weeks, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant.

One local tumor recurrence was observed among dogs that had limb-sparing surgery. Significant difference in survival time was not observed between dogs that had limb-sparing surgery and dogs that underwent amputation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Questionnaires were sent to veterinarians who had submitted a fibrosarcoma from a cat to the surgical pathology services of the veterinary schools of the University of Pennsylvania and Tufts University between Jan 1, 1991 and June 30, 1992. Questionnaire items included signalment, FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus status, site of sarcoma, vaccination site, vaccines used, treatment, biologic behavior of the tumor, and final outcome. Data were analyzed, using Student’s t-test for continuous data, χ2 test for categoric data, and log-rank test for survival estimates. Comparing results for cats with vaccination-site (vs) tumors and nonvaccination-site (nvs) tumors, we determined that vs tumors developed in younger cats and were larger than nvs tumors. Although vs sarcomas were biologically aggressive and redeveloped more often than nvs sarcomas, metastasis was not detected, and cats with vs tumors survived longer than cats with nvs tumors.

Vaccination-site sarcomas developed in cats after injection of many types of vaccines, administered singularly or in combination. Of the cats in the vs group administered a single vaccine, 37% were given rabies, 33% were given feline viral rhinotracheitis/calicivirus/panleuhopenia virus, and 30% were given FeLV vaccines. Cats with vs tumors were more likely to have received FeLV vaccine and less likely to have received rabies vaccine than those with nvs tumors. Although vaccines produced by certain manufacturers were used most often in cats with vs and nvs sarcomas, it was believed that this probably represented marketing practices and brand popularity. Many of the vaccines used had aluminum and other highly immunogenic adjuvants. We hypothesized that resident fibroblasts and myofibroblasts proliferated in the cats in response to injected adjuvants or other vaccine components, and, in some cats, these cells eventually underwent neoplastic transformation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 5 cats with hepatobiliary cystadenomas treated by means of surgical excision were reviewed. All cats were examined because of lethargy or abdominal enlargement. A cystic liver mass was seen in each cat ultrasonographically. Postoperative complications did not develop, and none of the cats developed evidence of tumor recurrence. Four cats died 12 to 44 months after surgery. Two cats were euthanatized for unrelated problems, and 2 cats died suddenly 25 and 44 months after surgery; the causes of death were not determined in either case. One cat was alive and considered clinically normal on physical examination 42 months after surgery.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Long-term follow-up information pertaining to 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone was collected from 17 veterinary institutions. The majority (72.5%) of dogs died or were euthanatized because of problems documented to be related to metastases. The first clinically apparent sites of metastasis were the lungs (60.8% of total), the skeleton (5.2%), or both (4.6%). A Kaplan-Meier survivorship distribution was plotted on the basis of available survival time data in all 162 dogs. The mean and median survival times were estimated to be 19.8 and 19.2 weeks, respectively, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 11.5 and 2.0% respectively.

Statistically significant relationships were not found between survival time and reporting institution, gender, site of primary tumor, whether the primary tumor was proximally or distally located, whether the primary tumor was located in the forelimb or hind limb, whether presurgical biopsy was performed, and whether death was tumor related. A significant (P < 0.01) quadratic relationship was found between age and survival time. Survival time was longest in dogs 7 to 10 years old and was shorter in older and younger dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association