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A wild young adult bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was admitted to the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital's Emergency Service after being found lying down by a good Samaritan. On physical examination, the bald eagle was responsive but dull and lethargic with drooping wings. It was estimated to be 10% dehydrated on the basis of a slow basilic vein refill time. The bird had a prominent keel and poor pectoral musculature, with a body condition score of 1 of 5 and body weight of 2.42 kg (5.32 lb). Hematologic evaluation revealed moderate anemia (PCV, 25%; reference range,

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-year-old neutered male domestic cat was referred for possible perineal urethrostomy because of a history of recurring bouts of cystitis and urethral obstruction. Results of the physical examination were unremarkable, and the bladder was easily expressed. Results of serum biochemical analysis and a CBC from the referring veterinarian were within reference limits except for a high concentration of glucose (166 mg/dL; range, 76 to 145 mg/dL). Abdominal ultrasonography was performed to further evaluate the urinary bladder (Figure 1).

Transverse ultrasonographic image of the liver and gallbladder of a 2-year-old neutered male domestic cat with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 4-year-old 10-kg (22-lb) spayed female French Bulldog was referred because of pleural effusion and aspiration pneumonia following treatment (induction of emesis and oral administration of activated charcoal) of an accidental overdose of trazodone that occurred 19 days earlier. Thoracic radiography performed by the referring veterinarian revealed a severe alveolar pattern in the right middle lung lobe and an interstitial to alveolar pattern in the cranial lung lobes. Thoracocentesis performed by the referring veterinarian yielded dark red to black fluid that by cytologic examination was determined to have been aseptic.

Transverse thoracic CT images at the level

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 1.5-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated at an emergency veterinary hospital immediately after vehicular trauma. Blood in the cat's mouth and around the nose, severe dyspnea, and instability of the pelvic limbs were noted on initial examination. Radiographic findings included a complete left femoral diaphyseal fracture, fracture of the left maxillary canine tooth, a minimally displaced mandibular symphyseal fracture, and moderate bilateral pneumothorax. The cat was hospitalized overnight in an oxygen cage (40% oxygen) and monitored. The following day, the patient was transferred to its regular veterinarian; the cat was sedated (protocol unknown), and orotracheal intubation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize abdominal lymphatic drainage in cats after thoracic duct ligation (TDL) and cisterna chyli ablation (CCA).

ANIMALS

7 purpose-bred research cats.

PROCEDURES

Baseline CT lymphangiography was performed. A popliteal lymph node was injected with iohexol, and images were acquired at 5-minute intervals for 15 minutes. Cats underwent TDL and CCA; methylene blue was used to aid in identifying lymphatic vessels. The CT lymphangiography was repeated immediately after and 30 days after surgery. All cats were euthanized and necropsied.

RESULTS

Results of baseline CT lymphangiography were unremarkable for all 7 cats. Only 5 cats completed the study. Leakage of contrast medium at the level of the cisterna chyli was seen on CT lymphangiography images obtained from all cats immediately after surgery. Evaluation of 30-day postoperative CT lymphangiography images revealed small branches entering the caudal vena cava in 2 cats, leakage of contrast medium into the caudal vena cava with no visible branches in 1 cat, and no contrast medium in the caudal vena cava in 2 cats. Contrast medium did not flow beyond the level of the cisterna chyli in any cat. Gross examination during necropsy revealed that all cats had small lymphatic vessels that appeared to connect to local vasculature identified in the region of the cisterna chyli.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Abdominal lymphaticovenous anastomoses formed after TDL and CCA in cats. This would support use of these procedures for treatment of cats with idiopathic chylothorax, although additional studies with clinically affected cats are warranted.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
History

An 8-year-old 43-kg (94.6-lb) castrated male Labrador Retriever was evaluated at the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of stranguria of 4 days’ duration. The dog was only able to expel a few drops of urine after straining for a prolonged time, although the urine produced was normal in appearance. The dog had no other notable medical history.

Clinical and Gross Findings

When the dog was first presented to the referring veterinarian, no abnormalities were identified on physical examination, and the results of routine hematologic and serum biochemical analyses were unremarkable. A urinary catheter was placed to allow

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association