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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize platelet-rich plasma (PRP) products obtained from canine blood by use of a variety of commercially available devices.

SAMPLE Blood samples from 15 dogs between 18 months and 9 years of age with no concurrent disease, except for osteoarthritis in some dogs.

PROCEDURES PRP products were produced from blood obtained from each of the 15 dogs by use of each of 5 commercially available PRP-concentrating systems. Complete blood counts were performed on each whole blood sample and PRP product. The degree of platelet, leukocyte, and erythrocyte concentration or reduction for PRP, compared with results for the whole blood sample, was quantified for each dog and summarized for each concentrating system.

RESULTS The various PRP-concentrating systems differed substantially in the amount of blood processed, method of PRP preparation, amount of PRP produced, and platelet, leukocyte, and erythrocyte concentrations or reductions for PRP relative to results for whole blood.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The characteristics of PRP products differed considerably. Investigators evaluating the efficacy of PRPs need to specify the characteristics of the product they are assessing. Clinicians should be aware of the data (or lack of data) supporting use of a particular PRP for a specific medical condition.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and MRI for diagnosing medial meniscal lesions in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) deficiency.

DESIGN Diagnostic test evaluation.

ANIMALS 26 dogs (31 stifle joints) with CCL deficiency.

PROCEDURES A single surgeon physically examined each dog and performed ultrasonography and arthroscopy of affected stifle joints to identify medial meniscal lesions. Video recordings of the arthroscopic procedure were saved and subsequently reviewed by the same surgeon and by a second surgeon working independently and blinded to results of all examinations. A radiologist blinded to results of all examinations evaluated MRI scans of the affected joints. Correct classification rate (CCR), sensitivity, and specificity of ultrasonography and MRI were calculated twice, with each of the 2 surgeons' arthroscopic assessments used as the reference standard.

RESULTS Compared with arthroscopic examination by the unblinded surgeon, ultrasonography had a CCR of 90%, sensitivity of 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73% to 100%), and specificity of 82% (95% CI, 48% to 97%). For MRI, these values were 84%, 75% (51% to 90%), and 100% (68% to 100%), respectively. Compared with arthroscopic assessment by the blinded surgeon, ultrasonography had a CCR of 84%, sensitivity of 86% (95% CI, 64% to 96%), and specificity of 78% (95% CI, 40% to 96%). For MRI, these values were 77%, 68% (45% to 82%), and 100% (63% to 100%), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These data suggested imperfect performance but clinical usefulness of both ultrasonography and MRI for diagnosing medial meniscal lesions in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association