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  • Author or Editor: Saad S. Enouri x
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Abstract

Objective—To assess the sedative and cardiopulmonary effects of medetomidine and xylazine and their reversal with atipamezole in calves.

Animals—25 calves.

Procedures—A 2-phase (7-day interval) study was performed. Sedative characteristics (phase I) and cardiopulmonary effects (phase II) of medetomidine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride administration followed by atipamezole hydrochloride administration were evaluated. In both phases, calves were randomly allocated to receive 1 of 4 treatments IV: medetomidine (0.03 mg/kg) followed by atipamezole (0.1 mg/kg; n = 6), xylazine (0.3 mg/kg) followed by atipamezole (0.04 mg/kg; 7), medetomidine (0.03 mg/kg) followed by saline (0.9% NaCl; 6) solution (10 mL), and xylazine (0.3 mg/kg) followed by saline solution (10 mL; 6). Atipamezole or saline solution was administered 20 minutes after the first injection. Cardiopulmonary variables were recorded at intervals for 35 minutes after medetomidine or xylazine administration.

Results—At the doses evaluated, xylazine and medetomidine induced a similar degree of sedation in calves; however, the duration of medetomidine-associated sedation was longer. Compared with pretreatment values, heart rate, cardiac index, and PaO2 decreased, whereas central venous pressure, PaCO2, and pulmonary artery pressures increased with medetomidine or xylazine. Systemic arterial blood pressures and vascular resistance increased with medetomidine and decreased with xylazine. Atipamezole reversed the sedative and most of the cardiopulmonary effects of both drugs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—At these doses, xylazine and medetomidine induced similar degrees of sedation and cardiopulmonary depression in calves, although medetomidine administration resulted in increases in systemic arterial blood pressures. Atipamezole effectively reversed medetomidine- and xylazine-associated sedative and cardiopulmonary effects in calves.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of administration of a peripheral α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist (L-659,066), with and without concurrent administration of glycopyrrolate, on cardiopulmonary effects of medetomidine administration in dogs.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (saline group), L-659,066 (group L), or L-659,066 with glycopyrrolate (group LG). These pretreatments were followed 10 minutes later by administration of medetomidine in a randomized crossover study. Hemodynamic measurements and arterial and mixed-venous blood samples for blood gas analysis were obtained prior to pretreatment, 5 minutes after pretreatment, and after medetomidine administration at intervals up to 60 minutes.

Results—After pretreatment in the L and LG groups, heart rate, cardiac index, and partial pressure of oxygen in mixed-venous blood (PvO2) values were higher than those in the saline group. After medetomidine administration, heart rate, cardiac index, and PvO2 were higher and systemic vascular resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, and central venous pressure were lower in the L and LG groups than in the saline group. When the L and LG groups were compared, heart rate was greater at 5 minutes after medetomidine administration, mean arterial blood pressure was greater at 5 and 15 minutes after medetomidine administration, and central venous pressure was lower during the 60-minute period after medetomidine administration in the LG group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of L-659,066 prior to administration of medetomidine reduced medetomidine-induced cardiovascular changes in healthy dogs. No advantage was detected with concurrent administration of L-659,066 and glycopyrrolate.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the cardiopulmonary effects of anesthetic induction with thiopental, propofol, or ketamine hydrochloride and diazepam in dogs sedated with medetomidine and hydromorphone.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs.

Procedures—Dogs received 3 induction regimens in a randomized crossover study. Twenty minutes after sedation with medetomidine (10 μg/kg, IV) and hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg, IV), anesthesia was induced with ketamine-diazepam, propofol, or thiopental and then maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Measurements were obtained prior to sedation (baseline), 10 minutes after administration of preanesthetic medications, after induction before receiving oxygen, and after the start of isoflurane-oxygen administration.

Results—Doses required for induction were 1.25 mg of ketamine/kg with 0.0625 mg of diazepam/kg, 1 mg of propofol/kg, and 2.5 mg of thiopental/kg. After administration of preanesthetic medications, heart rate (HR), cardiac index, and PaO 2 values were significantly lower and mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, and PaCO 2 values were significantly higher than baseline values for all regimens. After induction of anesthesia, compared with postsedation values, HR was greater for ketamine-diazepam and thiopental regimens, whereas PaCO 2 tension was greater and stroke index values were lower for all regimens. After induction, PaO 2 values were significantly lower and HR and cardiac index values significantly higher for the ketamine-diazepam regimen, compared with values for the propofol and thiopental regimens.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Medetomidine and hydromorphone caused dramatic hemodynamic alterations, and at the doses used, the 3 induction regimens did not induce important additional cardiovascular alterations. However, administration of supplemental oxygen is recommended.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research