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  • Author or Editor: S. Dru Forrester x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To measure urine concentrations of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), determine optimal storage conditions for urine samples, establish a reference range, and determine whether there is correlation between 24-hour total urine GAG excretion and the GAG-to-creatinine ratio (GCR).

Animals—14 healthy adult dogs.

Procedure—Single urine sample GAG concentrations and GCRs were measured in samples collected from 14 healthy dogs at the start of the 24-hour collection period. Twenty-four–hour total urine GAG excretions were determined from urine collected during a 24-hour period in the same 14 dogs. Total sulfated GAG concentrations were also measured in urine from these dogs after the urine had been stored at 4°C and -20°C for 1, 7, and 30 days.

Results—Urine GAG concentrations were not significantly different from baseline values after urine was stored at 4°C for up to 1 day and -20°C for up to 30 days. Neither single urine sample GAG concentration (R , 0.422) nor GCR (R , 0.084) was an adequate predictor of 24-hour total urine GAG excretion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study provide data that can be used to establish a reference range for 24-hour total urine GAG excretion in dogs and adequate conditions for sample storage. Contrary to findings in humans, there was no significant linear correlation between 24-hour total urine GAG excretion and single urine sample GCR in dogs, limiting clinical use of the single urine sample test.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association