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Objective

To evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes and serologic changes in cryptococcal antigen and antibody titers in cats with confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

Design

Prospective case series.

Animals

47 cats with cryptococcosis.

Procedure

Cats included in this study were determined to have cryptococcosis on the basis of identification of C neoformans on histologic or cytologic examination, isolation of C neoformans in culture, or positive serologic test results for cryptococcal antigens. Information concerning the signalment, history, physical examination findings, FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus status, serologic testing, treatment, and outcome for each cat was requested on a survey form. Follow-up measurements of serum cryptococcal antigen and antibody titers were requested for all surviving cats.

Results

Signalment and clinical signs of cats with cryptococcosis reported here were consistent with previous reports. Treatment consisted primarily of azole antifungal drugs. All cats were seronegative for cryptococcal antibodly titers, whether tested initially or at follow-up examination. All but 1 cat tested were seropositive for cryptococeal antigens when initially tested. Cats with and without clinical signs of C neoformans infection were seropositive for cryptococcal antigens months to years after initial diagnosis of cryptococcosis.

Clinical Implications

The results of this study indicate that serum titers to cryptococcal antigens in cats can persist with or without clinical signs for months to years after an initial diagnosis of cryptococcosis is made. Repeated evaluation of serum cryptococcal antigen titers is advised during the treatment of cats to monitor progress, evaluate prognosis, and guide cessation of treatment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:1110-1113)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine the correlation of seroimmunologic test results between reference and nonreference laboratories.

Design

Retrospective data analysis.

Procedure

Serum samples obtained from naturally infected dogs and cats were distributed to reference and nonreference laboratories for seroimmunologic testing. Correlation of test results was evaluated by use of nonparametric analysis.

Results

Correlation coefficients were high between laboratory groups for samples tested for feline immunodeficiency virus antibodies, FeLV antigen, and toxoplasmosis antibodies in cats. Results for feline immunodeficiency virus antibody tests from reference laboratories were more likely to be positive than results from nonreference laboratories. Test results for feline infectious peritonitis antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, and Borrelia antibodies in cats were not significant. Coefficient correlations were significant for results of heartworm antigen, Brucella antibodies, Toxoplasma antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, and rheumatoid factor in dogs. Results for Borrelia antibodies were not correlated between laboratory groups.

Clinical Implications

Results were highly correlated between reference and nonreference laboratories for 8 of 14 seroimmunologic tests. Seroimmunologic tests for use in cats were less correlated as a group than those for use in dogs. Poor correlation of results between laboratories was attributed to variations in control agents, antigens, reagents, technical expertise, and cutoff values and end-point titers used for diagnosis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996,209:914-917)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association