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Summary

Decision analysis was used to evaluate the clinical usefulness of 2 diagnostic tests: one for canine heartworm disease and the other for bovine traumatic reticuloperitonitis. Several clinically relevant measures of test performance are introduced, including expected utility, risk profile, testing band, threshold analysis, and the relative cost of misdiagnosis. One of the principal benefits of decision analysis of diagnostic tests is that the technique can be used to determine how changes in underlying assumptions will affect clinical decisions. If clinicians can identify and assign values to relevant variables, then decision analysis can provide clinically meaningful guidelines for interpreting the results of diagnostic tests. To take advantage of these techniques, clinicians must become comfortable with quantitative expressions for test performance, risk, and prognosis.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the immune response induced by Borrelia theileri infection and to determine whether B theileri induces cross-reacting antibodies to other bovine borreliae.

Animals

Two 3-month-old calves, 1 of which was splenectomized.

Procedure

Calves were exposed to Boophilus microplus infected with B theileri. Rectal temperature, PCV, bacteremia, and clinical signs of infection were monitored. Serum was obtained weekly and used to evaluate the humoral response to homologous antigen and B burgdorferi and B coriaceae, using an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, and to B burgdorferi, using a commercially available ELISA. The identity of cross-reacting antigens was explored, using monoclonal antibodies to genus- and species-specific antigens in an IFA test.

Results

B theileri-infected calves produced antibodies that cross-reacted with B burgdorferi and B coriaceae whole-cell antigens. Borrelia theileri whole-cell antigen was recognized by genus-specific monoclonal antibody H9724 but not by species-specific antibody H5332. False-positive reactions were not observed when serum from B theileri-infected calves was tested by use of the ELISA for B burgdorferi.

Conclusions

B theileri induces humoral responses in infected cattle that can be confused with those of other borrelial infections. Care must be taken to definitively distinguish between the various borreliae that may cause disease in cattle.

Clinical Relevance

Serologic cross-reactivity must be taken into account when making a serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis or epizootic abortion in epidemiologic studies involving cattle. (Am J Vet Res 1999; 60:694–697)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize changes in lymphocyte subsets over time in foals from birth to 18 weeks of age, accounting for differences among individuals, and to determine the effect of overnight storage of blood samples on foal lymphocyte subset concentrations.

Animals—8 healthy Quarter Horse foals from birth to 18 weeks of age.

Procedure—Blood samples were collected longitudinally from birth to 18 weeks of age and a CBC performed on each sample. The samples were stained for lymphocyte markers, either immediately or after overnight storage and analyzed by flow cytometry.

Results—Total leukocytes, total lymphocytes, and the absolute concentrations of all lymphocyte subsets increased significantly with age. The proportions of B29A+, CD21+, and equine major histocompatability complex class-II molecule+ lymphocytes increased significantly with age. The proportion of equine (Eq) CD5+, EqCD8+, and EqWC4+ lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. Significant differences among foals were found with respect to initial concentrations with respect to initial concentrations, but not with respect to the rate of increase of the various subsets tested. Significant differences were not found in subset values when comparing blood samples stained on the day of collection or after overnight storage at room temperature (approx 21 C) or under refrigeration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These results are consistent with an increase in subset numbers and proportions over time, but with individual differences among foals. The observation of individual differences in subsets among foals suggests that there may be individual differences in susceptibility to infectious disease during the perinatal period. The absence of an effect of overnight storage makes field studies of lymphocyte subset concentrations more feasible. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:531–537)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the plasma pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin between 3-week-old (preweaned) and 6-month-old (weaned) calves and to characterize the distribution of tulathromcyin into pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) of preweaned and weaned calves following SC administration of a single dose (2.5 mg/kg).

ANIMALS 8 healthy 3-week-old and 8 healthy 6-month-old Holstein steers.

PROCEDURES A jugular catheter and SC ultrafiltration probe were aseptically placed in the neck of each calf before tulathromycin administration. Blood, ISF, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected at predetermined times before and after tulathromycin administration for quantification of drug concentration. A urea dilution method was used to estimate tulathromycin concentration in PELF from that in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tulathromycin–plasma protein binding was determined by in vitro methods. Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined by a 2-compartment model. Pharmacokinetic parameters and drug concentrations were compared between preweaned and weaned calves.

RESULTS Clearance and volume of distribution per fraction of tulathromycin absorbed were significantly greater for weaned calves than preweaned calves. Tulathromycin–plasma protein binding was significantly greater for weaned calves than preweaned calves. Maximum PELF tulathromycin concentration was significantly greater than the maximum plasma and maximum ISF tulathromycin concentrations in both groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that age affected multiple pharmacokinetic parameters of tulathromycin, likely owing to physiologic changes as calves mature from preruminants to ruminants. Knowledge of those changes may be useful in the development of studies to evaluate potential dose adjustments during treatment of calves with respiratory tract disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of a commercially available multivalent killed virus vaccine on serum neutralizing (SN) and colostrum neutralizing (CN) antibodies against bovine herpesvirus (BHV) type 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2 in pregnant dairy cattle.

ANIMALS 49 Holstein dairy cattle.

PROCEDURES 25 cattle were vaccinated (IM injection) at least 60 days prior to calving (ie, at the end of the lactation period or according to the expected calving date for heifers) and again 5 weeks later. The remaining 24 cattle were not vaccinated (control group). Titers of SN antibodies were measured at the 5-week time point. Titers of SN and CN antibodies were measured at parturition.

RESULTS 5 weeks after initial vaccination, titers of SN antibodies against BHV-1 and BVDV types 1 and 2 were 1:512, 1:128, and 1:2,048, respectively, in vaccinates and 1:64, 1:128, and 1:64, respectively, in unvaccinated controls. Equivalent SN antibody titers at parturition were 1:256, 1:64, and 1:512, respectively, in vaccinates and 1:128, 1:128, and 1:64, respectively, in controls. Median titers of CN antibodies against BHV-1 and BVDV types 1 and 2 were 1:1,280, 1:10,240, and 1:20,480, respectively, in vaccinates and 1:80, 1:1,280, and 1:2,560, respectively, in controls.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Titers of antibodies against viral respiratory pathogens were significantly enhanced in both serum (BHV-1 and BVDV type 2) and colostrum (BHV-1 and BVDV types 1 and 2) in cattle receiving a killed virus vaccine (with no adverse reactions) before parturition. To maximize protection of bovine neonates, this method of vaccination should be considered.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the ability of lufenuron to control cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis felis) populations on dogs under conditions simulating a naturally infested home environment.

Design

2 treatment and 2 control groups of dogs. Treated dogs received lufenuron in tablet form monthly, and controls received excipient. Dogs had unrestricted access to indoor (carpeted) and outdoor (grassy) environments in which self-propagating flea populations had been established.

Animals

17 adult female Beagles.

Procedure

Dogs were monitored for 77 days after initial infestation with fleas and 70 days after initial treatment. Efficacy of the drug was calculated on the basis of absolute reduction in flea counts and as a percentage of control.

Results

Lufenuron administration caused a statistically significant (P < 0.05) reduction in flea burdens in treated dogs, compared with controls. Initiation of treatment 7 days after infestation resulted in 75% control of F1-generation and 97% control of F2-generation fleas over a 70-day posttreatment period.

Conclusions

Lufenuron was highly effective in reducing flea populations on dogs. The time required for control will vary with the duration (generation time) of the flea reproductive cycle and, hence, the geographic area in which the product will be used. The experimental results are most relevant to use of the product for control of an existing flea population in the Midwest. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:502–504)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe plasma pharmacokinetic parameters and tissue elimination of flunixin in veal calves.

ANIMALS 20 unweaned Holstein calves between 3 and 6 weeks old.

PROCEDURES Each calf received flunixin (2.2 mg/kg, IV, q 24 h) for 3 days. Blood samples were collected from all calves before the first dose and at predetermined times after the first and last doses. Beginning 24 hours after injection of the last dose, 4 calves were euthanized each day for 5 days. Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by compartmental and noncompartmental methods.

RESULTS Mean ± SD plasma flunixin elimination half-life, residence time, and clearance were 1.32 ± 0.94 hours, 12.54 ± 10.96 hours, and 64.6 ± 40.7 mL/h/kg, respectively. Mean hepatic and muscle flunixin concentrations decreased to below FDA-established tolerance limits (0.125 and 0.025 μg/mL, respectively) for adult cattle by 3 and 2 days, respectively, after injection of the last dose of flunixin. Detectable flunixin concentrations were present in both the liver and muscle for at least 5 days after injection of the last dose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The labeled slaughter withdrawal interval for flunixin in adult cattle is 4 days. Because administration of flunixin to veal calves represents extralabel drug use, any detectable flunixin concentrations in edible tissues are considered a violation. Results indicated that a slaughter withdrawal interval of several weeks may be necessary to ensure that violative tissue residues of flunixin are not detected in veal calves treated with that drug.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether soil concentrations of total or virulent Rhodococcus equi differed among breeding farms with and without foals with pneumonia caused by R equi.

Sample Population—37 farms in central Kentucky.

Procedures—During January, March, and July 2006, the total concentration of R equi and concentration of virulent R equi were determined by use of quantitative bacteriologic culture and a colony immunoblot technique, respectively, in soil specimens obtained from farms. Differences in concentrations and proportion of virulent isolates within and among time points were compared among farms.

Results—Soil concentrations of total or virulent R equi did not vary among farms at any time point. Virulent R equi were identified in soil samples from all farms. Greater density of mares and foals was significantly associated with farms having foals with pneumonia attributable to R equi. Among farms with affected foals, there was a significant association of increased incidence of pneumonia attributable to R equi with an increase in the proportion of virulent bacteria between samples collected in March and July.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that virulent R equi were commonly recovered from soil of horse breeding farms in central Kentucky, regardless of the status of foals with pneumonia attributable to R equi on each farm. The incidence of foals with pneumonia attributable to R equi can be expected to be higher at farms with a greater density of mares and foals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare isolates of Rhodococcus equi on the basis of geographic source and virulence status by use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE).

Sample Population—290 isolates of R equi(218 virulent isolates from foals and 72 avirulent isolates from feces, soil, and respiratory tract samples) obtained between 1985 and 2000 from horses and horse farms from 4 countries.

Procedure—DNA from isolates was digested with the restriction enzyme AseI and tested by use of PFGE. Products were analyzed for similarities in banding patterns by use of dendrograms. A similarity matrix was constructed for isolates, and the matrix was tested for nonrandom distributions of similarity values with respect to groupings of interest.

Results—There was little grouping of isolates on the basis of country, virulence status, or region within Texas. Isolates of R equi were generally < 80% similar, as determined by use of PFGE. Isolates from the same farm generally were rarely of the same strain.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Considerable chromosomal variability exists among isolates of R equi obtained from the same farm, sites within Texas, or among countries from various continents. Only rarely will it be possible to link infections to a given site or region on the basis of analysis of isolates by use of PFGE of chromosomal DNA. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:153–161)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research