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  • Author or Editor: Rod A. W. Rosychuk x
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Summary

Determination of antibodies to specific nuclear antigens, termed extractable nuclear antigen (ena), was investigated in healthy dogs and in dogs with autoimmune, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. Using a counter-immunoelectrophoresis method, the dogs' sera were tested for antibodies against the nuclear antigens single-stranded dna, Sm, Ro, La, ribonucleoprotein, Scl, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Antibodies to the Ro antigen were found in 1 dog with discoid lupus erythematosus, in 1 dog with pemphigus erythematosus, and in 1 dog with facial pyoderma and chronic superficial keratitis. In 15 dogs, antibodies were detected to ena, but the precipitin lines were too weak to identify the specific ena. These antibodies were found in some dogs with systemic lupus erythematosus, discoid lupus erythematosus, pemphigus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, vitiligo, lymphoma; in the dog with facial pyoderma and chronic superficial keratitis; and in 1 healthy dog. The highest percentage of dogs with antibodies to ena in a large series (> 8) of this study was in dogs with systemic lupus erythematosus (4 of 13; 31%).

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Clinical signs, laboratory findings, and treatment results of 40 cats with the histologic diagnosis of plasma cell stomatitis-pharyngitis are discussed. Median age was 7.1 years, with no discernable sex predilection. Anorexia and difficulty prehending food were the most common clinical signs. Hyperproteinemia with associated hyperglobulinemia was the most common laboratory finding. Of various treatments, administration of corticosteroids or injectable gold (aurothioglucose) proved most effective in controlling the clinical signs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the synthetic retinoids isotretinoin and etretinate to treat dogs with intracutaneous cornifying epitheliomas (ice), other benign skin neoplasias, and cutaneous lymphoma. Twenty-four dogs were used. All tumors were diagnosed by histologic examination. Ten dogs with multiple (at least 5) benign skin tumors (7 with ice, 1 each with inverted papillomas, sebaceous adenomas and epidermal cysts) were treated with isotretinoin (n = 7) and/or etretinate (n = 5). Twelve dogs with cutaneous lymphoma were treated with isotretinoin, and 2 dogs with cutaneous lymphoma were initially treated with etretinate. Successful treatment with isotretinoin was achieved in 1 dog with ice, 1 with inverted papillomas, and 1 with epidermal cysts. Partial improvement with isotretinoin was seen in 2 dogs with ice. Successful treatment was achieved with etretinate in 4 dogs with ice (Norwegian Elkhound was the predominant breed with ice). Remission was achieved in 6 of the 14 dogs with cutaneous lymphoma. Adverse effects developed in 7 of the 24 dogs, so treatment was stopped in 2 dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 30 dogs with histologically confirmed sebaceous adenitis that were treated with isotretinoin or etretinate were reviewed. Akitas and Standard Poodles were overrepresented, compared with the general hospital population. Thirteen dogs had concurrent pyoderma.

The retinoids were administered for a minimum of 2 months. Dosage for the 13 dogs treated with isotretinoin only ranged from 0.8 to 3.5 mg/kg of body weight/d (mean, 1.4 mg/kg/d). Dosage for the 10 dogs treated with etretinate only ranged from 0.7 to 1.8 mg/kg/d (mean, 1.1 mg/kg/d). Two dogs were first given isotretinoin (mean dosage, 1.5 mg/kg/ d) and, when they did not respond, were subsequently given etretinate (mean dosage, 0.85 mg/kg/d). Five dogs were first given etretinate (mean dosage, 1 mg/kg/d) and, when they did not respond, were subsequently given isotretinoin (mean dosage, 1.6 mg/kg/d).

For the 20 dogs treated with isotretinoin, 1 was lost to follow-up; 9 of the remaining 19 had a successful outcome (> 50% reduction in severity of scaling and extent of alopecia, compared with pretreatment appearance). For the 17 dogs treated with etretinate, 9 had a successful outcome. Outcome could not be predicted on the basis of clinical signs or histologic findings, and a prognosis could not be determined on the basis of whether sebaceous glands were evident histologically.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association