Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: Robert W. Wills x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine intra- and interobserver reliability of a fluorescein stain–based tear film breakup time (TFBUT) test as performed in a clinical environment with and without administration of a topical anesthetic.

ANIMALS

21 privately owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

A randomized study design was used. Two independent observers that commonly perform the TFBUT test in clinical practice read the same description of TFBUT. Observers performed TFBUT testing for each dog before and after topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine solution in 4 testing periods with a 1-hour interval between periods. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis was used to assess inter- and intraobserver test reliability. Linear mixed models were used to assess the main effects of testing period, observer, eye, and presence of ophthalmic disorders and their interactions on TFBUT.

RESULTS

Mean TFBUT measurements performed by observer 1 and observer 2 were 5.9 seconds and 8.6 seconds, respectively, when adjusted for other effects in the model. Intraobserver ICC was poor for one observer and moderate for the other. Interobserver ICC was poor without use of topical anesthetic and slightly lower when anesthetic was used. Observer and testing period were each significantly associated with TFBUT; the measurements decreased and were more variable after multiple applications of fluorescein stain and proparacaine.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested tear film stability is negatively affected by topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine solution and repeated applications of fluorescein stain. The TFBUT test as performed in this study had poor to moderate reliability.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate coagulation factors in units of leukoreduced (LR) and nonleukoreduced (non-LR) canine fresh-frozen plasma (cFFP).

ANIMALS

8 healthy research dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a crossover study, dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups from which blood was collected and either did or did not undergo leukoreduction. After a recovery period of ≥ 28 days, the dogs were switched between protocols. After each collection, blood samples were centrifuged, and cFFP was stored frozen for later comparative analysis of coagulation factors, antithrombin, and protein C activities (reported as comparative percentages of the corresponding activities determined in a canine pooled plasma standard); prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times; and fibrinogen concentration.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences detected between results for LR cFFP, compared with those for non-LR cFFP.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although there was variation among residual activities of coagulation factors in LR and non-LR cFFP, the variations and differences were considered unlikely to impact the efficacy of LR cFFP transfused for coagulation factor replacement in dogs. However, owing to the small sample size and high variability of results in the present study, additional research with a larger sample size is required for definitive conclusions on the effects of leukoreduction on coagulation factors in cFFP and to develop treatment guidelines for LR cFFP use in dogs with congenital and acquired coagulopathies.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether medial patellar luxation would affect radiographic tibial plateau angle (TPA) measurements in small-breed dogs.

DESIGN Prospective cross-sectional study.

ANIMALS 15 small-breed dogs (25 stifle joints) with grade 2 or 3 medial patellar luxation (5 dogs with unilateral luxation and 10 dogs with bilateral luxation).

PROCEDURES Digital mediolateral radiographic images of each affected stifle joint were acquired with the patella in manually reduced (n = 25) and luxated (25) positions. In 2 measurement sessions separated by > 48 hours, 3 observers unaware of patella status (luxated or reduced) measured the TPA in each image twice in random order. Mixed linear modeling was performed to determine the effect of patella status on TPA measurements, and intraobserver and interobserver variation in measurements were calculated.

RESULTS TPA measurements by all observers differed significantly between the first and second measurement sessions, but by a mean value of only 0.7°. A few significant differences were identified between 1 pair of observers by patella status and between patella statuses for 1 observer, but all mean differences were ≤ 1.7°. No significant difference in intraobserver variation was identified between patella statuses for any observer. Interobserver variation was not affected by patella status and measurement session.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although some significant differences were identified in radiographic TPA measurements in dogs with medial patellar luxation, depending on whether the patella was luxated or manually reduced, these differences were so small they could be considered clinically unimportant. Consequently, we believe that in small-breed dogs with patellar luxation, patella status would be unlikely to have a clinically meaningful effect on the measured TPA.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine brain region affinity for and retention of gadolinium in dogs after administration of gadodiamide and whether formalin fixation affects quantification.

ANIMALS 14 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES 13 dogs received gadodiamide (range, 0.006 to 0.1 mmol/kg, IV); 1 control dog received a placebo. Dogs received gadodiamide 3 to 7 days (n = 8) or 9 hours (5) before euthanasia and sample collection. Brain regions were analyzed with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy. Associations between dose, time to euthanasia, and gadolinium retention quantities (before and after fixation in 5 dogs) were evaluated.

RESULTS Gadolinium retention was seen in all brain regions at all doses, except for the control dog. Exposure 3 to 7 days before euthanasia resulted in 1.7 to 162.5 ng of gadolinium/g of brain tissue (dose-dependent effect), with cerebellum, parietal lobe, and brainstem affinity. Exposure 9 hours before euthanasia resulted in 67.3 to 1,216.4 ng of gadolinium/g of brain tissue without dose dependency. Transmission electron microscopy revealed gadolinium in examined tissues. Fixation did not affect quantification in samples immersed for up to 69 days.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Gadodiamide exposure resulted in gadolinium retention in the brain of healthy dogs. Cerebellum, parietal lobe, and brainstem affinity was detected with dose dependency only in dogs exposed 3 to 7 days before euthanasia. Fixation had no effect on quantification when tissues were immersed for up to 69 days. Physiologic mechanisms for gadolinium retention remained unclear. The importance of gadolinium retention requires further investigation.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate eicosanoid concentrations in freshly prepared canine packed RBCs (PRBCs) and to assess changes in eicosanoid concentrations in PRBC units over time during storage and under transfusion conditions.

DESIGN Prospective study.

SAMPLE 25 plasma samples from 14 healthy Greyhounds.

PROCEDURES Plasma samples were obtained during PRBC preparation (donation samples), and the PRBC units were then stored at 4°C until used for transfusion (≤ 21 days later; n = 17) or mock transfusion if expired (22 to 24 days later; 8). Immediately prior to use, 100 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was added to each unit and a pretransfusion sample was collected. A posttransfusion sample was collected after transfusion or mock transfusion. Concentrations of arachidonic acid, prostaglandin (PG) F, PGE2, PGD2, thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF, and leukotriene B4 were measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and analyzed statistically.

RESULTS Median arachidonic acid concentration was significantly decreased in posttransfusion samples, compared with the concentration in donation samples. Median PGF, 6-keto-PGF, and leukotriene B4 concentrations were significantly increased in pretransfusion samples, compared with those in donation samples. Median PGF, thromboxane B2, and 6-keto-PGF concentrations were significantly increased in posttransfusion samples, compared with those in pretransfusion samples. Duration of PRBC storage had significant associations with pretransfusion and posttransfusion arachidonic acid and thromboxane B2 concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Concentrations of several proinflammatory eicosanoids increased in PRBC units during storage, transfusion, or both. Accumulation of these products could potentially contribute to adverse transfusion reactions, and investigation of the potential association between eicosanoid concentrations in PRBCs and the incidence of transfusion reactions in dogs is warranted.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the in vitro and in vivo platelet function of healthy dogs during administration of a low-dose aspirin regimen.

ANIMALS 16 dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs received aspirin (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 7 days. Blood and urine samples were collected before (day 1; baseline) and on days 3 and 7 of the low-dose aspirin regimen. Platelet function was evaluated by use of turbidimetric and conventional impedance aggregometry, multiple-electrode impedance aggregometry, a platelet function analyzer (PFA), and determination of urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 concentration. Turbidimetric aggregometry results were compared with the results obtained by the other 4 methods. Fourteen days after cessation of aspirin, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with acetylsalicylic acid and platelet function was assessed by turbidimetric aggregometry to determine whether this technique could accurately identify dogs that responded to the low-dose aspirin regimen.

RESULTS Of the 16 dogs, 13 had turbidimetric and conventional impedance aggregometry results that were decreased by > 25% from baseline on days 3 and 7, and 4 and 7 dogs had PFA closure times > 300 seconds on days 3 and 7, respectively. The median urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 concentration–to–creatinine concentration ratio decreased by 49% between days 1 and 7. Turbidimetric aggregometry results were correlated with conventional impedance aggregometry results. There was poor agreement between the turbidimetric aggregometry and PFA results. The multiple-electrode impedance aggregometry protocol failed to reliably detect aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction. In vitro incubation of platelet-rich plasma with acetylsalicylic acid followed by turbidimetric aggregometry did not predict whether dogs responded to the low-dose aspirin regimen.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the response to a low-dose aspirin regimen varied among healthy dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:174–185)

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of 2 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) sampling techniques and the use of N-butylscopolammonium bromide (NBB) on the quantity and quality of BAL fluid (BALF) samples obtained from horses with the summer pasture endophenotype of equine asthma.

ANIMALS 8 horses with the summer pasture endophenotype of equine asthma.

PROCEDURES BAL was performed bilaterally (right and left lung sites) with a flexible videoendoscope passed through the left or right nasal passage. During lavage of the first lung site, a BALF sample was collected by means of either gentle syringe aspiration or mechanical suction with a pressure-regulated wall-mounted suction pump. The endoscope was then maneuvered into the contralateral lung site, and lavage was performed with the alternate fluid retrieval technique. For each horse, BAL was performed bilaterally once with and once without premedication with NBB (21-day interval). The BALF samples retrieved were evaluated for volume, total cell count, differential cell count, RBC count, and total protein concentration.

RESULTS Use of syringe aspiration significantly increased total BALF volume (mean volume increase, 40 mL [approx 7.5% yield]) and decreased total RBC count (mean decrease, 142 cells/μL), compared with use of mechanical suction. The BALF nucleated cell count and differential cell count did not differ between BAL procedures. Use of NBB had no effect on BALF retrieval.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that retrieval of BALF by syringe aspiration may increase yield and reduce barotrauma in horses at increased risk of bronchoconstriction and bronchiolar collapse. Further studies to determine the usefulness of NBB and other bronchodilators during BAL procedures in horses are warranted.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether a maxillary nerve block via a modified infraorbital approach, applied before rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy of dogs, would decrease procedural nociception, minimize cardiorespiratory anesthetic effects, and improve recovery quality.

ANIMALS 8 healthy adult hound-type dogs

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, dogs received 0.5% bupivacaine (0.1 mL/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution as a maxillary nerve block via a modified infraorbital approach. A 5-cm, 20-gauge over-the-needle catheter was placed retrograde within each infraorbital canal, and bupivacaine or saline solution was administered into each pterygopalatine region. Rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy were performed. Variables monitored included heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP), plasma cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations, purposeful movement, and pain scores. After a 14-day washout period, the other treatment was administered on the contralateral side, and rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy were repeated.

RESULTS SAP, MAP, and DAP were significantly higher for the saline solution treatment than for the bupivacaine treatment, irrespective of the time point. Plasma cortisol concentrations after saline solution treatment were significantly higher 5 minutes after nasal biopsy than at biopsy. Heart rate, norepinephrine concentration, purposeful movement, and pain score were not significantly different between treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maxillary nerve block via a modified infraorbital approach prior to rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy reduced procedural nociception as determined on the basis of blood pressures and plasma cortisol concentrations during anesthesia. These findings warrant further evaluation in dogs with nasal disease.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare biomechanical and histologic features of heart valves and echocardiographic findings between Quarter Horses with and without heritable equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA).

DESIGN Prospective case-control study.

ANIMALS 41 Quarter Horses.

PROCEDURES Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of aortic and mitral valve leaflets was assessed by biomechanical testing in 5 horses with HERDA and 5 horses without HERDA (controls). Histologic evaluation of aortic and mitral valves was performed for 6 HERDA-affected and 3 control horses. Echocardiography was performed in 14 HERDA-affected and 11 control horses. Biomechanical data and echocardiographic variables of interest were compared between groups by statistical analyses,

RESULTS Mean values for mean and maximum UTS of heart valves were significantly lower in HERDA-affected horses than in controls. Blood vessels were identified in aortic valve leaflets of HERDA-affected but not control horses. Most echocardiographic data did not differ between groups. When the statistical model for echocardiographic measures was controlled for body weight, mean and maximum height and width of the aorta at the valve annulus in short-axis images were significantly associated with HERDA status and were smaller for affected horses.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Lower UTS of heart valves in HERDA-affected horses, compared with those of control horses, supported that tissues other than skin with high fibrillar collagen content are abnormal in horses with HERDA. Lack of significant differences in most echocardiographic variables between affected and control horses suggested that echocardiography may not be useful to detect a substantial loss of heart valve tensile strength. Further investigation is warranted to confirm these findings. Studies in horses with HERDA may provide insight into cardiac abnormalities in people with collagen disorders.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association