Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Robert R. King x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Summary

Medical records were reviewed for 93 dogs with bacterial pneumonia from which transtracheal aspiration samples were obtained for culturing of Mycoplasma spp and aerobic bacteria. On the basis of culture results, there were 65 Mycoplasma-positive dogs, including 7 dogs for which only Mycoplasma spp were isolated, and 28 Mycoplasma-negative dogs. Most dogs were > 5 years old, and differences in breed or gender distribution among the 3 groups of dogs were not detected. Hematologic and serum biochemical analysis results did not differ significantly between Mycoplasma-positive and Mycoplasma-negative dogs. Fifty-three of 93 (57%) dogs had a concurrent medical problem that may have predisposed them to developing bacterial pneumonia as a sequelae to aspiration or immunosuppression. Mycoplasma-positive dogs were significantly (P < 0.005) more likely to have > 1 species of bacteria isolated from their transtracheal aspiration samples. Clinical outcome was favorable when antimicrobials were selected on the basis of antimicrobial susceptibility results for the other bacterial isolates and not on results of the antimicrobial activity against Mycoplasma spp. It could not be determined whether Mycoplasma spp were primary pathogens or only opportunists.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Transcutaneous pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography was used to obtain velocity signals from the aortic and pulmonary roots of clinically normal adult dogs tranquilized with acepromazine. Doppler-derived variables included peak ejection velocity, ejection time, and velocity-time integral. The cross-sectional areas of the left and right ventricular outflow tracts were estimated from diameters of the respective orifices measured from two-dimensional echocardiographic images. These data were used to calculate stroke volume and cardiac output for each ventricle. Linear, single variable regressions of ejection time, velocity-time integral, and peak velocity with body weight showed no significant correlations. Significant correlations existed between body weight and estimated left and right ventricular stroke volume and cardiac output. A close correspondence existed between pulmonary and aortic determinations of velocity-time integral, stroke volume, and cardiac output. These results provide an initial framework for interpretation of clinical data by veterinary cardiologists.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether anti-inflammatory doses of cyclosporine activate Toxoplasma gondii in chronically infected cats or potentiate infection in cats exposed for the first time.

ANIMALS 30 T gondii–negative cats.

PROCEDURES Cats were assigned to 1 of 3 groups (10 cats/group). Group 1 (control) cats were administered a placebo for 126 days; group 2 cats were administered a placebo for 84 days, followed by cyclosporine at 7.5 mg/kg/d, PO, for 42 days; and group 3 cats were administered cyclosporine at 7.5 mg/kg/d, PO, for 126 days. Cats were orally inoculated with T gondii on day 42. Results for fecal flotations, PCR assays, and histologic examinations and IgM and IgG titers were analyzed. Cyclosporine concentrations were measured on selected days.

RESULTS All cats were infected by T gondii and developed signs of self-limiting gastrointestinal tract infection. Group 3 had the highest incidence and severity of CNS and pulmonary histopathologic findings typical of toxoplasmosis. One cat in group 3 died of systemic toxoplasmosis; that cat had a cyclosporine concentration of 1,690 ng/mL. Group 2 cats infected with T gondii before cyclosporine administration did not have repeated oocyst shedding. Group 3 cats shed fewer oocysts for a shorter time than did control cats of group 1.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Oral administration of cyclosporine in accordance with the protocol for this study did not potentiate the enteroepithelial phase of T gondii infection. Cats with high cyclosporine blood concentrations at the time of primary T gondii infection may be at risk of developing systemic toxoplasmosis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical response and toxic effects of cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2- diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) (L-NDDP) administered IV at escalating doses to cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Animals—18 cats with oral SCC.

Procedure—Cats that failed to respond to conventional treatment or had nonresectable tumors were included. Data included a CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, cytologic examination of a fineneedle aspirate of enlarged lymph nodes, and thoracic and oral radiographs for clinical staging. A starting dose (75 to 100 mg/m2 of L-NDDP) was administered IV. At 21-day intervals, subsequent doses increased by the rate of 5 or 10 mg/m2. Response was evaluated every 21 days by tumor measurement and thoracic radiography. Quality of life was assessed by owners, using a performance status questionnaire.

Results—On average, cats received 2 treatments. Toxicoses included an intermittent, acute anaphylactoid- parasympathomimetic reaction, lethargy or sedation (≤ 24 hours), inappetence or signs of depression (≤ 72 hours), mild to moderate increase in hepatic enzyme activity, and melena. Pulmonary, renal, or hematopoietic abnormalities were not evident. Performance status surveys indicated normal behavior and grooming or decreased activity and self-care (19/20 assessments), ate well with or without assistance (15/20), and did not lose weight (15/20). Median survival time was 59.8 days (mean, 54.1 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—L-NDDP was ineffective for treatment of cats with oral SCC. None of the cats had a complete or partial remission. Acute toxicoses and poor therapeutic response limit therapeutic usefulness of L-NDDP in cats, unless dosage, frequency, and administration procedures can be improved. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 791–795)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research