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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe clinical findings, treatments, and outcomes for cattle with complete traumatic exungulation.

ANIMALS

10 bovines.

PROCEDURES

Record databases of 2 teaching hospitals were searched to identify cattle treated for traumatic exungulation between January 1993 and December 2018. Information about signalment, clinical signs and findings, treatment, and outcome was extracted from the records or obtained by telephone communication with the owner.

RESULTS

Records for 5 bulls, 4 heifers, and 1 cow with a median age of 2 years (range, 1 day to 10 years) and weight of 379.1 kg (range, 30 to 909.1 kg) were reviewed. Duration of clinical signs ranged from ≤ 24 hours to 3.5 days. Five of 7 animals had a lameness score > 3/5. Complete exungulation occurred in 6 medial digits (3 hind limbs and 3 forelimbs) and 5 lateral digits (1 hind limb and 4 forelimbs); 1 calf had complete exungulation of both digits of a forelimb. Treatments included bandaging (n = 9), antimicrobials (9), anti-inflammatories (8), hoof block application to the adjacent digit (7), regional anesthesia (6), cast application (4), curettage of the third phalanx (3), regional antimicrobial perfusion (1), and local application of antimicrobial-impregnated beads (1). All 7 cattle with long-term (≥ 9 months) information available returned to their intended function; 6 had no residual lameness, and 3 required regular corrective trimming of the affected digit.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested the prognosis for long-term survival and return to intended function is fair to good for cattle with complete exungulation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 12-month-old 98-kg (215-lb) Hampshire Down ram was evaluated at the Oklahoma State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of a 3-month history of progressively increasing, clear nasal discharge and a 1-week history of left-sided facial swelling and increased respiratory noise. A long-acting injectable eprinomectin product had been administered to the ram 2 months before the initial examination. One year earlier, another sheep in the flock showed similar clinical signs and was culled; however, the underlying cause of the condition was not determined.

On examination, the ram had a firm swelling over the dorsolateral aspect of the left side of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 6-month-old 93-kg (205-lb) Duroc gilt was evaluated for a 1-month history of a grade 3/5 lameness of the left forelimb. Physical examination revealed moderate effusion of the left shoulder joint. Survey radiography (Figure 1) was performed to determine the cause of the lameness and effusion.

Mediolateral radiographie view of the left shoulder joint of a 6-month-old Duroc gilt evaluated for a 1-month history of left forelimb lameness.

Determine whether additional imaging studies are required, or make your diagnosis from Figure 1—then turn the page

Radiographic Findings and Interpretation

A smooth,

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize clinical findings and outcomes for cattle with nonpathological phalangeal fractures.

ANIMALS

17 cattle with nonpathological phalangeal fractures.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of a teaching hospital were reviewed to identify cattle treated for nonpathological phalangeal fracture between May 2004 and May 2020. Information extracted from the records of study-eligible animals included signalment, history, clinical and diagnostic imaging findings, treatment, and survival to hospital discharge. Long-term outcome was assessed by telephone communication with owners.

RESULTS

9 bulls and 8 heifers or cows (age range, 1 to 7 years) of various breeds and uses were evaluated. Five of the 9 bulls were bucking stock, which were overrepresented in the study population. Seven animals had 8 distal phalanx fractures; 10 animals had 11 proximal phalanx fractures. Eight animals were treated by application of a hoof block on the unaffected adjacent digit, 7 animals were treated with a distal limb (n = 6) or transfixation pin (1) cast in addition to a hoof block, 1 animal was treated with a hoof trim to elevate and alleviate weight bearing on the affected digit, and 1 animal was euthanized immediately after diagnosis. Sixteen animals survived to hospital discharge. Follow-up was obtained for 12 animals, of which 9 returned to functionable use and 3 were culled.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested cattle with a nonpathological phalangeal fracture have a favorable prognosis for return to function following application of a hoof block to the unaffected adjacent digit with or without a distal limb cast.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate potential prognostic indicators for does with pregnancy toxemia (PT) and their offspring.

DESIGN

Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS

56 does.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify does with PT. Signalment, history, clinical signs, examination findings, treatments, number of offspring present, and duration of hospitalization for does as well as outcome (death vs survival to hospital discharge) for does and their kids were recorded. Variables of interest were examined for association with outcome by contingency table analyses.

RESULTS

Boer goats were overrepresented, compared with the general population of goats for the facility in the last year of the study. Most (15/36) does had appropriate body condition scores. All pregnancies involved twins (11/56), triplets (37), or quadruplets (7). Neutrophilia (26/26) and hyperglycemia (32/40) were common in does. Most (39/56) does survived to hospital discharge. Does with high BUN concentration and those with serum bicarbonate concentration < 15 mEq/L were more likely to die than does without these findings. Forty-nine does survived to delivery of offspring; survival to discharge for these does was positively associated with outcome of their offspring. Among offspring of dams that survived to their delivery, twins had a higher survival rate than quadruplets. Death was more likely for offspring delivered by cesarean section than for those delivered vaginally.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested Boers were more likely to develop PT than goats of other breeds in the population examined at the study hospital. In contrast with other studies, hyperglycemia was common in affected does. Further research is needed to confirm associations with outcome identified in this study.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine correlations between dietary cation anion difference (DCAD) and urine pH, urine specific gravity, and blood pH in goats.

Animals—24 crossbred goat wethers. Procedures—Goats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 DCAD groups (−150, −75, 0, or +75 mEq/kg of feed) and fed pelleted feed and ground hay for 7 days. The diet was then supplemented with ammonium chloride to achieve the assigned DCAD of each group for 7 days. Urine was obtained for pH and specific gravity measurements at hours −3 to −1, 1 to 3, 5 to 7, 9 to 11, and 13 to 15 relative to the morning feeding. Blood pH was determined on alternate days of the study period.

Results—Goats in the −150 and −75 mEq/kg groups had a urine pH of 6.0 to 6.5 two days after initiation of administration of ammonium chloride, and urine pH decreased to < 6.0 by day 7. Goats in the 0 mEq/kg group had a urine pH from 6.0 to 6.5 on day 5, whereas urine pH in goats in the +75 mEq/kg group remained > 6.5 throughout the trial. Urine specific gravity differed only between the −150 mEq/kg and the −75 mEq/kg groups. Blood pH in the −150 mEq/kg group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Goats in the 0 mEq/kg DCAD group had a urine pH of 6.0 to 6.5 five days after intitiation of feeding the diet, and that pH was maintained through day 7, without significant reduction in blood pH. This may serve as a target for diet formulation for the prevention of urolithiasis.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To identify and evaluate 3 types of angiographic catheters for retrograde urinary bladder catheterization in healthy male goats.

ANIMALS 12 sexually intact yearling Alpine-cross bucks.

PROCEDURES Three 5F angiographic catheters of the same length (100 cm) and diameter (0.17 cm) but differing in curvature at the tip were labeled A (straight tip), B (tip bent in 1 place), and C (tip bent in 2 places). During a single anesthetic episode, attempts were made to blindly pass each catheter into the urinary bladder of each goat. Order of catheters used was randomized, and the veterinarian passing the catheter was blinded as to catheter identity. The total number of attempts at catheter passage and the total number of successful attempts were recorded.

RESULTS Catheter A was unsuccessfully passed in all 12 goats, catheter B was successfully passed in 8 goats, and catheter C was successfully passed in 4 goats. The success rate for catheter B was significantly greater than that for catheter A; however, no significant difference was identified between catheters B and C or catheters A and C.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE 2 angiographic catheters were identified that could be successfully, blindly advanced in a retrograde direction into the urinary bladder of healthy sexually intact male goats. Such catheters may be useful for determining urethral patency, emptying the urinary bladder, and instilling chemolysing agents in goats with clinical obstructive urolithiasis.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To define the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in synovial fluid (SYNF) and serum from central venous (CV) and digital venous (DV) blood samples following regional IV perfusion (RIVP) of the distal portion of the hind limb in cows.

Animals—6 healthy adult cows.

Procedures—In each cow, IV catheters were placed in the dorsal common digital vein (DCDV) and the plantar vein of the lateral digit, and an indwelling catheter was placed in the metatarsophalangeal joint of the left hind limb. A pneumatic tourniquet was applied to the midmetatarsal region. Florfenicol (2.2 mg/kg) was administered into the DCDV. Samples of DV blood, SYNF, and CV (jugular) blood were collected after 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 hours, and the tourniquet was removed; additional samples were collected at intervals for 24 hours after infusion. Florfenicol analysis was performed via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—In DV blood, CV blood, and SYNF, mean ± SD maximum florfenicol concentration was 714.79 ± 301.93 μg/mL, 5.90 ± 1.37 μg/mL, and 39.19 ± 29.42 μg/mL, respectively; area under the concentration versus time curve was 488.14 ± 272.53 h•μg•mL−1, 23.10 ± 6.91 h•μg•mL−1, and 113.82 ± 54.71 h•μg•mL−1, respectively; and half-life was 4.09 ± 1.93 hours, 4.77 ± 0.67 hours, and 3.81 ± 0.81 hours, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Following RIVP, high florfenicol concentrations were achieved in DV blood and SYNF, whereas the CV blood concentration remained low. In cattle, RIVP of florfenicol may be useful in the treatment of infectious processes involving the distal portion of limbs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research