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  • Author or Editor: Robert E. Larson x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and analyze data from controlled studies on the effectiveness of vaccinating cattle with commercially available viral antigen vaccines for mitigation of the effects of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC).

Design—Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Sample—31 studies comprising 88 trials.

Procedures—Studies that reported the effectiveness of commercially available bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI3) vaccines for protection of cattle against BRDC or its components were included in the analysis. Studies or trials were categorized as natural exposure or experimental challenge and were further divided by the viral antigen evaluated and vaccine type (modified-live virus [MLV] or inactivated vaccine). Meta-analysis was performed; summary Mantel-Haenszel risk ratios were determined, and Forest plots were generated.

Results—In natural exposure trials, beef calves vaccinated with various antigen combinations had a significantly lower BRDC morbidity risk than did nonvaccinated control calves. In trials evaluating BHV-1 and MLV BVDV vaccines in experimental challenge models, vaccinated calves had a lower BRDC morbidity risk than did control calves; however, in experimental challenge trials evaluating MLV BRSV and PI3 vaccines, no significant difference in morbidity or mortality risk was found between vaccinated and control calves.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Estimating clinical efficacy from results of experimental challenge studies requires caution because these models differ substantially from those involving natural exposure. The literature provides data but does not provide sufficiently strong evidence to guide definitive recommendations for determining which virus components are necessary to include in a vaccination program for prevention or mitigation of BRDC in cattle.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the relationship between rectal temperature at first treatment for bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in feedlot calves and the probability of not finishing the production cycle.

Design—Retrospective data analysis.

Animals—344,982 calves identified as having BRDC from 19 US feedlots from 2000 to 2009.

Procedures—For each calf, data for rectal temperature at initial treatment for BRDC and various performance and outcome variables were analyzed. A binary variable was created to identify calves that did not finish (DNF) the production cycle (died or culled prior to cohort slaughter). A mixed general linear model and receiver operating characteristic curve were created to evaluate associations of rectal temperature, number of days in the feedlot at time of BRDC diagnosis, body weight, quarter of year at feedlot arrival, sex, and all 2-way interactions with rectal temperature with the probability that calves DNF.

Results—27,495 of 344,982 (7.97%) calves DNF. Mean rectal temperature at first treatment for BRDC was 40.0°C (104°F). As rectal temperature increased, the probability that a calf DNF increased; however, that relationship was not linear and was influenced by quarter of year at feedlot arrival, sex, and number of days in the feedlot at time of BRDC diagnosis. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for correct identification of a calf that DNF was 0.646.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Rectal temperature of feedlot calves at first treatment for BRDC had limited value as a prognostic indicator of whether those calves would finish the production cycle.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, relative barometric pressure, and temperature-humidity index (THI) on nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures in cattle during extreme summer conditions.

Animals—20 black crossbred beef heifers (mean body weight, 217.8 kg).

Procedures—Nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures were monitored every 2 hours for 24 hours on 3 nonconsecutive days when ambient temperature was forecasted to exceed 32.2°C. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and relative barometric pressure were continuously monitored at a remote weather station located at the research facility. The THI was calculated and used in the livestock weather safety index (LWSI). Relationships between nasal submucosal or rectal temperature and weather variables were evaluated.

Results—Nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures were related to all weather variables monitored. A positive relationship was determined for ambient temperature and THI with both nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures. A negative relationship was evident for nasal submucosal and rectal temperature with relative humidity, wind speed, and relative barometric pressure. Nasal submucosal and rectal temperatures increased with increasing severity of LWSI category.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Effects of environmental conditions on thermoregulation in calves exposed to extreme heat were detected. The positive relationship between nasal submucosal temperature and ambient temperature and THI raised concerns about the efficacy of intranasal administration of temperature-sensitive modified-live virus vaccines during periods of extreme heat. Environmental conditions must be considered when rectal temperature is used as a diagnostic tool for identifying morbid cattle.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess biometric tools for gait analysis in healthy calves by use of pressure mat sensors, a handheld algometer, and serial circumferential measurements of selected joints.

Animals—20 six- to eight-week-old healthy male Holstein calves.

Procedures—Calves were evaluated over a 4-day period. Gait analysis was performed by training calves to walk over a pressure-sensitive mat, which recorded quantitative measurements. An algometer was applied perpendicular to each joint until an aversion response was observed or a preset limit of 50 N/cm2 was obtained. Circumference measurements of the carpal and tarsal joints were obtained by the application of a flexible measuring tape to defined areas of each limb. Variability between joint circumference measurements and pressure mat variables were analyzed with a standard least squares means model. Algometer measurements were dichotomized, and logistic regression was used to assess the probability that a calf reacted to algometer-applied pressure.

Results—1 calf was removed from the study because of lameness. Mean carpal and tarsal joint circumference measurements were reliable and consistent among calves. Algometry results suggested that healthy calves were more sensitive to pressure applied to the elbow and stifle joints, compared with pressure applied to the carpal, tarsal, and metacarpophalangeal or metatarsophalangeal joints. Pressure mat variables of stance time and stride velocity varied greatly among calves, whereas impulse and maximum forces varied little.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings can serve as reference points for other studies and be used for comparison with results for calves with lameness or altered gaits.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of ambient temperature on viral replication and serum antibody titers following administration of an intranasal modified-live infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR)-parainfluenza-3 (PI3) virus vaccine to beef calves housed in high– (> 32°C) and moderate– (21°C) ambient temperature environments.

Animals—28 calves (mean weight, 206.8 kg).

Procedures—Calves were randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups (housed outdoors during high ambient temperature with [HAT; n = 10] or without [HAC; 4] vaccination or housed indoors in a moderate ambient temperature with [MAT; 10] or without [MAC; 4] vaccination). Rectal and nasal mucosal temperatures were recorded every 2 hours from 8 AM to 8 PM on days 0 (vaccination) and 1. Nasal swab specimens were obtained on days 0 through 7 for virus isolation. Serum samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, and 28 for determination of antibody titers.

Results—Mean rectal temperature did not differ among the treatment groups. Mean nasal temperature for the HAT group was significantly higher than that for the MAT group at 6, 24, 30, 32, and 38 hours after vaccination. Viable IBR virus was isolated from all vaccinated calves on days 1 through 6. Two weeks after vaccination, vaccinated calves had anti-IBR antibody titers that were significantly greater than those for unvaccinated calves. Mean anti-IBR antibody titers did not differ significantly between the HAT and MAT groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that, following vaccination with an intranasal modified-live IBR-PI3 virus vaccine, IBR viral replication and serum antibody titers did not differ significantly between calves housed in high– and moderate–ambient temperature environments.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the precision of a clinical illness score (CIS) system for identification of clinical signs in calves with experimentally induced Mycoplasma bovis pneumonia and to evaluate the accuracy of CISs in relation to pulmonary consolidation scores assigned at necropsy.

Animals—178 Holstein bull calves that were 52 to 91 days of age at the time of pneumonia induction.

Procedures—5 trials involved calves challenged with M bovis and scheduled for euthanasia and necropsy 12 to 24 days afterward. Nine veterinarian observers with various degrees of experience simultaneously assigned CISs to calves within 48 hours before necropsy. The precision of the CIS system among observers was evaluated via the Cohen κ statistic. The accuracy of each observer's CISs relative to 6 cutoffs (≥ 5%, ≥ 10%, ≥ 15%, ≥ 20%, ≥ 25%, and ≥ 30%) of percentage pulmonary consolidation was determined by comparing prenecropsy CISs with the gross pulmonary consolidation scores assigned at necropsy. Estimates for sensitivity and specificity were calculated relative to the 6 pulmonary consolidation cutoffs.

Results—A slight level of agreement was evident among observers (κ range, 0.10 to 0.21 for the individual trials) and overall (κ = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.24). Median sensitivity and specificity changed with pulmonary consolidation score cutoff. Median sensitivity for all observers ranged from 81.7% to 98.9%, and median specificity ranged from 80.8% to 94.9% over all cutoff values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Agreement among observers assigning CISs to calves was low; the accuracy of the CIS system in relation to that of pulmonary consolidation scoring varied with the severity of consolidation considered to represent bovine respiratory disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the proportion of yearling beef bulls classified as satisfactory potential breeders when reevaluated after failing an initial breeding soundness evaluation (BSE) and identify any factors at initial BSE that predicted satisfactory performance at reevaluation.

DESIGN Retrospective observational study.

ANIMALS 2,064 beef bulls between 11 and 14 months of age at first BSE, evaluated from 2006 to 2014.

PROCEDURES For each bull, data on age (categorized by month), breed, and BSE findings were extracted from the medical records. Bulls were classified as satisfactory potential breeders if they met Society for Theriogenology standards at the initial BSE or up to 2 subsequent reevaluations. Generalized linear mixed models were generated to assess potential associations between certain variables at initial BSE and passing that evaluation or passing subsequent BSEs after initial failure.

RESULTS 1,921 of 2,064 (93.1%) yearling bulls passed 1 of up to 3 BSEs. The proportion of yearling bulls that were not classified as satisfactory during initial BSE but were later classified as satisfactory was 143 of 287 (49.8%). A significant interaction was identified between bull age and breed in the probability of passing the initial evaluation. No variable, including breed, age, scrotal circumference per day of age, and spermatozoa morphology at initial BSE, significantly predicted passing subsequent reevaluations after failing an initial BSE.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Age and breed information should be considered when deciding the age at which initial BSE should be scheduled for a yearling bull cohort.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether infrared thermographic images obtained the morning after overnight heat abatement could be used as the basis for diagnostic algorithms to predict subsequent heat stress events in feedlot cattle exposed to high ambient temperatures.

ANIMALS 60 crossbred beef heifers (mean ± SD body weight, 385.8 ± 20.3 kg).

PROCEDURES Calves were housed in groups of 20 in 3 pens without any shade. During the 6 am and 3 pm hours on each of 10 days during a 14-day period when the daily ambient temperature was forecasted to be > 29.4°C, an investigator walked outside each pen and obtained profile digital thermal images of and assigned panting scores to calves near the periphery of the pen. Relationships between infrared thermographic data and panting scores were evaluated with artificial learning models.

RESULTS Afternoon panting score was positively associated with morning but not afternoon thermographic data (body surface temperature). Evaluation of multiple artificial learning models indicated that morning body surface temperature was not an accurate predictor of an afternoon heat stress event, and thermographic data were of little predictive benefit, compared with morning and forecasted weather conditions.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated infrared thermography was an objective method to monitor beef calves for heat stress in research settings. However, thermographic data obtained in the morning did not accurately predict which calves would develop heat stress later in the day. The use of infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool for monitoring heat stress in feedlot cattle requires further investigation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of lactoferrin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proliferation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), gene expression of inflammatory mediators, and production of prostanoids in vitro.

Sample Population—PBMCs isolated from 15 Holstein bull calves.

Procedures—Mixed populations of PBMCs were isolated by differential centrifugation. Proliferation assays were conducted in 96-well plates designed to allow addition of lactoferrin (200 ng/mL) with and without LPS (1 μg/mL) in a checkerboard design. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine was used to determine proliferation of PBMCs. Prostaglandin E2 production was determined in culture-conditioned medium by use of enzyme immunoassay. Effects of lactoferrin on LPS-induced gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 were monitored by use of PCR assays.

Results—Lactoferrin supplementation significantly reduced LPS-induced incorporation of 3H-thymidine and production of prostaglandin E2 by PBMCs. Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 mRNA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lactoferrin reduced LPS-induced cellular proliferation, inflammatory mediator gene expression, and prostaglandin E2 production by bovine PBMCs in vitro. These effects may be beneficial in reducing the impact of endotoxemia in neonates.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research