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  • Author or Editor: Robert A. Kroll x
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Summary

The efficacy of a diet designed to facilitate dissolution of feline magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) uroliths was evaluated in 30 cases of urocystoliths, involving 27 cats. The number of urocystoliths per cat varied from 1 to 5. In 20 cases of urolithiasis, sterile struvite uroliths dissolved in a mean of 36 days after initiation of dietary treatment. In 5 cases of urolithiasis, struvite urocystoliths associated with urease-negative bacterial urinary tract infection dissolved in a mean of 23 days after initiation of dietary and antimicrobial treatment. In 3 cases of urolithiasis, struvite urocystoliths associated with urease-positive staphylococcal urinary tract infection dissolved in a mean of 79 days after initiation of dietary and antimicrobial treatment. Dissolution of uroliths in cats fed the treatment diet was associated with concomitant remission of dysuria, hematuria, and pyuria, and reduction in urine pH and struvite crystalluria. In one case, a urocystolith composed of 100% ammonium urate, and in another case, a urolith composed of 60% calcium phosphate, 20% calcium oxalate, and 20% magnesium ammonium phosphate did not dissolve.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To evaluate efficacy and safety of the calcium channel antagonist nimodipine in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

Design—

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—

10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Dogs were included if seizures were inadequately controlled despite treatment with barbiturates and serum phenobarbital concentrations were > 25 μg/ml, if dogs had intolerable adverse effects when treated with barbiturates, or if dogs had mild, inadequately treated seizures.

Procedures—

Dogs were treated with nimodipine (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb] of body weight. PO, q 12 h), and other medications were slowly withdrawn. Dogs were monitored for seizure frequency and severity as well as any adverse effects to the medication.

Results—

Few adverse effects were reported. Seizure control, however, was generally inadequate. All but 2 dogs were withdrawn from the study because of poor seizure control. Plasma nimodipine concentrations were low, with a mean peak concentration of 105.3 ng/ml.

Clinical Implications—

Nimodipine was not successful in controlling seizures in dogs used in this study. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:1298–1301)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association