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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Ninety-five aborted bovine fetuses received from California dairies over a 4.5-year period had histologic lesions of focal encephalitis. Protozoa that reacted with Neospora caninum antiserum were detected in the brain of 88 of these fetuses and in the heart of 1 fetus. Sarcocystis spp schizonts were seen in the vascular endothelium of 1 fetus. It was concluded that a Neospora-like cyst-forming coccidian may be a major cause of abortion in California dairy cattle.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Environmental variables in 10 commercial turkey confinement buildings, representing 2 natural ventilation designs, were measured during summer and the following winter. Sliding doors spaced at intervals along the walls of 5 of the buildings provided about 35% opening, and continuous wall curtains provided 60 to 80% opening in the other 5 buildings. Environmental variables assessed included airspeed; temperature; relative humidity; gases; particle number, size, and mass per cubic meter of air; and colonies of bacteria, yeasts, and other fungi per cubic meter of air. Colonies of yeasts and other fungi were quantitated in feed and litter. For most of the variables evaluated, significant differences were not attributable to building ventilation design; however, in winter, the total mass of particulate matter per cubic meter of air was higher in the curtain-type houses, compared with sliding door-type houses. Ammonia concentration in the air of sliding door-type houses progressively increased during summer and winter sampling periods. A significant effect of building ventilation design on turkey performance was not detected when using mortality, average daily gain, feed conversion, condemnations at slaughter, or average individual bird weight as measures of production.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research