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  • Author or Editor: Riccardo Finotello x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate whether serial determinations of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in dogs with lymphoma could be used to predict outcome and assist in early recognition of disease progression.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—50 dogs with lymphoma.

Procedures—LDH activity was determined in dogs with newly diagnosed lymphoma or that had not received treatment. The LDH activity was measured at time of initial diagnosis, at completion of chemotherapy, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after chemotherapy. Treatment response and recurrence were recorded. At the end of chemotherapy and at each time point thereafter, the proportion of dogs in complete remission with elevated LDH activity was compared between dogs that did or did not have recurrence within the successive 45 or 90 days. Use of the LDH activity at admission to predict disease-free and survival intervals was evaluated.

Results—The proportion of dogs in complete remission with increased LDH activity at completion of chemotherapy and at 1 month after chemotherapy with recurrence during the successive 45 days was significantly higher (3/9 and 7/9 dogs, respectively) than the proportion of dogs without recurrence (0/32 and 1/26 dogs, respectively). At 3 or 6 months, only 1 dog without recurrence within 45 days had increased LDH activity. Increased LDH activity at time of diagnosis was not associated with disease-free and survival intervals.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Determination of LDH activity may help with identifying episodes of recurrence in dogs with lymphoma. Anticipation of recurrence is an appropriate reason to begin rescue treatment.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome of dogs with inflammatory carcinoma (IC) and identify patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors associated with overall survival time.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—43 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Records of dogs with a clinical diagnosis of IC that had histologic evidence of dermal lymphatic invasion were reviewed. Data on clinical staging, treatment, toxicoses, response, and survival time were retrieved.

Results—26 (60%) dogs had primary IC and 17 (40%) had secondary IC. Thirty-five (81%) dogs had distant metastases and 2 (5%) had local metastases at the time of initial examination. Six of 29 (21%) dogs had a coagulopathy. Sixteen (37%) dogs did not receive specific treatment for IC, 24 (56%) received medical treatment only, 2 (5%) underwent surgical excision and received medical treatment, and 1 (2%) underwent surgical excision only. Forty-one (95%) dogs had progressive disease, and 2 (5%) had stable disease. Mean survival time for all dogs was 60 days (range, 1 to 300 days). Dogs with a coagulopathy survived a significantly shorter time than did dogs without a coagulopathy (odds ratio, 0.28), and dogs that received medical treatment survived significantly longer than dogs that did not (odds ratio, 2.54).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that mammary IC is a biologically aggressive condition in dogs associated with a guarded prognosis. In addition, results suggested that medical treatment may improve outcome, thereby supporting its use in dogs with IC.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate ultrasound-guided placement of an anchor wire (AW) or injection of methylene blue (MB) to aid in the intraoperative localization of peripheral lymph nodes in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

125 dogs and 10 cats with a total of 171 lymphadenectomies.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent peripheral lymphadenectomies with or without (N) the AW or MB localization technique were reviewed. Data retrieved included clinical, surgical, and histologic findings. The proportions of successful lymphadenectomies, lymph node characteristics, and complications among the 3 groups were analyzed.

RESULTS

143 (84%) lymph nodes were successfully excised. Lymphadenectomy success was significantly affected by the localization technique, with 94% for group AW, 87% for group MB, and 72% for group N. Lymph node size was smaller in groups AW and MB, compared with group N. Duration of lymphadenectomy was shorter in group AW, compared with groups MB and N, and in group MB, compared with group N. Intra- (7%) and postoperative (10%) complications and final diagnosis did not significantly differ among groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Both lymph node localization techniques were highly successful and reduced surgery time, compared with unassisted lymphadenectomy. Specifically, these techniques were effective for localization of normal-sized and nonpalpable lymph nodes and were efficient and practical options for peripheral lymphadenectomies, particularly for those that were small or nonpalpable.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine an optimal time interval between amputation and initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy (TIamp-chemo) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases and whether TIamp-chemo was associated with outcome.

ANIMALS

168 client-owned dogs treated at 9 veterinary oncology centers.

PROCEDURES

Data were collected from the dogs’ medical records concerning potential prognostic variables and outcomes. Dogs were grouped as to whether they received chemotherapy within 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, or > 30 days after amputation of the affected limb. Analyses were performed to identify variables associated with time to tumor progression and survival time after limb amputation and to determine an optimal TIamp-chemo.

RESULTS

Median TIamp-chemo was 14 days (range, 1 to 210 days). Median time to tumor progression for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (375 days; 95% CI, 162 to 588 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (202 days; 95% CI, 146 to 257 days). Median overall survival time for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (445 days; 95% CI, 345 to 545 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (239 days; 95% CI, 186 to 291 days).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that early (within 5 days) initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy after limb amputation was associated with a significant and clinically relevant survival benefit for dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases. These results suggested that the timing of chemotherapy may be an important prognostic variable.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the Kiupel (2 categories) and Patnaik (3 categories) histologic grading systems for predicting the presence of metastasis at the time of initial examination in dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—386 client-owned dogs with cutaneous MCTs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed cutaneous MCTs that had undergone complete clinical staging were reviewed for clinical and histopathologic data.

Results—All Patnaik grade 1 MCTs (n = 52) were classified as Kiupel low-grade MCTs, and all Patnaik grade 3 MCTs (43) were classified as Kiupel high-grade MCTs. Of the 291 Patnaik grade 2 MCTs, 243 (83.5%) were classified as Kiupel low-grade tumors, and 48 (16.5%) were classified as Kiupel high-grade MCTs. Dogs with Patnaik grade 3 MCTs were significantly more likely to have metastases at the time of initial examination than were dogs with grade 1 or 2 MCTs (OR, 5.46), and dogs with Kiupel high-grade MCTs were significantly more likely to have metastases than were dogs with Kiupel low-grade MCTs (OR, 2.54). However, 3 of 52 (5.8%) dogs with Patnaik grade 1 tumors, 48 of 291 (16.5%) dogs with Patnaik grade 2 tumors, and 44 of 295 (14.9%) dogs with Kiupel low-grade tumors had metastatic disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings indicated that in dogs with cutaneous MCTs, prognostication should not rely on histologic grade alone, regardless of grading system used, but should take into account results of clinical staging.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association