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  • Author or Editor: Reza Seddighi x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of IM administration of a tiletamine hydrochloride–zolazepam hydrochloride (TZ) combination with either dexmedetomidine hydrochloride or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (SS) on the motor response to claw clamping, selected cardiorespiratory variables, and quality of recovery from anesthesia in alpacas.

ANIMALS 5 adult sexually intact male alpacas.

PROCEDURES Each alpaca was given the TZ combination (2 mg/kg) with dexmedetomidine (5 [D5], 10 [D10], 15 [D15], or 20 [D20] µg/kg) or SS IM at 1-week intervals (5 experiments); motor response to claw clamping was assessed, and characteristics of anesthesia, recovery from anesthesia, and selected cardiorespiratory variables were recorded.

RESULTS Mean ± SEM duration of lack of motor response to claw clamping was longest when alpacas received treatments D15 (30.9 ± 5.9 minutes) and D20 (40.8 ± 5.9 minutes). Duration of lateral recumbency was significantly longer with dexmedetomidine administration. The longest time (81.3 ± 10.4 minutes) to standing was observed when alpacas received treatment D20. Following treatment SS, 4 alpacas moved in response to claw clamping at the 5-minute time point. Heart rate decreased from pretreatment values in all alpacas when dexmedetomidine was administered. Treatments D10, D15, and D20 decreased Pao2, compared with treatment SS, during the first 15 minutes. During recovery, muscle stiffness and multiple efforts to regain a sternal position were observed in 3 SS-treated and 1 D5-treated alpacas; all other recoveries were graded as excellent.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In TZ-anesthetized alpacas, dexmedetomidine (10, 15, and 20 µg/kg) administered IM increased the duration of lack of motor response to claw clamping, compared with the effect of SS.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) on elution properties of plaster of Paris (POP).

Sample Population—27 POP cylinders, 27 POP spheres, and 9 polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spheres.

Procedures—Pellets were loaded with gentamicin (50 mg/g) and divided into 7 groups of 9 beads each: PMMA spheres; POP cylinders coated with 0, 4, or 8 layers of SIS; and POP spheres coated with 0, 4, or 8 layers of SIS. Gentamicin concentration was measured 6, 12, 18, 24, 32, 40, and 48 hours and 3, 4, 5, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after wrapping. Porosity was evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. Curvature factor of elution curves, total amount of drug released (TDR), time required to reach 50% of total release (TDRt50), and number of days with concentrations ≥ 1 μg/mL were compared among groups.

Results—SIS decreased the curvature factor and increased the TDRt50 and TDR of POP spheres and cylinders. Curvature factor of the PMMA-release curve remained lower than that for any POP group, but all POP groups wrapped in SIS released more gentamicin than PMMA spheres. Gentamicin concentrations remained ≥ 1 μg/mL in SIS-wrapped POP and PMMA groups throughout the study. Wrapping POP in SIS minimized the increase in porosity of pellets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Wrapping POP with SIS slows the release and increases the amount of gentamicin leaching from spheres and cylinders. All groups wrapped in SIS maintained antimicrobial concentrations greater than the minimum inhibitory concentration of most pathogens.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum infusion rate (MIR) of propofol required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus in dogs anesthetized with propofol alone or propofol in combination with a constant rate infusion (CRI) of ketamine.

ANIMALS 6 male Beagles.

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized on 3 occasions, at weekly intervals, with propofol alone (loading dose, 6 mg/kg; initial CRI, 0.45 mg/kg/min), propofol (loading dose, 5 mg/kg; initial CRI, 0.35 mg/kg/min) and a low dose of ketamine (loading dose, 2 mg/kg; CRI, 0.025 mg/kg/min), or propofol (loading dose, 4 mg/kg; initial CRI, 0.3 mg/kg/min) and a high dose of ketamine (loading dose, 3 mg/kg; CRI, 0.05 mg/kg/min). After 60 minutes, the propofol MIR required to prevent movement in response to a noxious electrical stimulus was determined in duplicate.

RESULTS Least squares mean ± SEM propofol MIRs required to prevent movement in response to the noxious stimulus were 0.76 ± 0.1 mg/kg/min, 0.60 ± 0.1 mg/kg/min, and 0.41 ± 0.1 mg/kg/min when dogs were anesthetized with propofol alone, propofol and low-dose ketamine, and propofol and high-dose ketamine, respectively. There were significant decreases in the propofol MIR required to prevent movement in response to the noxious stimulus when dogs were anesthetized with propofol and low-dose ketamine (27 ± 10%) or with propofol and high-dose ketamine (30 ± 10%).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Ketamine, at the doses studied, significantly decreased the propofol MIR required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate antinociceptive and selected effects associated with IM administration of xylazine hydrochloride in combination with tiletamine-zolazepam in llamas.

Animals—8 adult male llamas.

Procedures—Each llama received tiletamine-zolazepam (2 mg/kg) combined with either xylazine (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4 mg/kg) or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution IM (treatments designated as TZ-Xy0.1, TZ-Xy0.2, TZ-Xy0.4, and TZ-Sal, respectively) at 1-week intervals. Selected cardiorespiratory variables were assessed during lateral recumbency and anesthesia, and recovery characteristics were recorded. Duration of antinociception was evaluated by clamping a claw every 5 minutes.

Results—Interval between treatment administration and lateral recumbency for TZ-Xy0.4 was shorter than that for TZ-Xy0.1 or TZ-Sal. Mean ± SEM duration of antinociception was longer for TZ-Xy0.4 (51.3 ± 7. 0 minutes), compared with findings for TZ-Xy0.2 (31.9 ± 6.0 minutes), TZ-Xy0.1 (8.1 ± 4.0 minutes), and TZ-Sal (0.6 ± 0.6 minutes). Interval between treatment administration and standing was longer for TZ-Xy0.4 (112 ± 9 minutes) than it was for TZ-Xy0.2 (77 ± 9 minutes) or TZ-Sal (68 ± 9 minutes). Mean heart and respiratory rates during the first 30 minutes for TZ-Sal exceeded values for the other treatments. Administration of TZ-Xy0.2 and TZ-Xy0.4 resulted in Pao 2 < 60 mm Hg at 5 minutes after llamas attained lateral recumbency, and values differed from TZ-Sal findings at 5, 10, and 15 minutes; Paco 2 was greater for TZ-Xy0.2 and TZ-Xy0.4 than for TZ-Sal at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Xylazine (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) increased the duration of antinociception in llamas anesthetized with tiletamine-zolazepam.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate use of the plethysmographic variability index (PVI) and perfusion index (PI) for evaluating changes in arterial blood pressure in anesthetized tigers (Panthera tigris).

ANIMALS 8 adult tigers.

PROCEDURES Each tiger was anesthetized once with a combination of ketamine, midazolam, medetomidine, and isoflurane. Anesthetic monitoring included assessment of PI, PVI, direct blood pressure measurements, anesthetic gas concentrations, esophageal temperature, and results of capnography and ECG. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was maintained for at least 20 minutes at each of the following blood pressure conditions: hypotensive (MAP = 50 ± 5 mm Hg), normotensive (MAP = 70 ± 5 mm Hg), and hypertensive (MAP = 90 ± 5 mm Hg). Arterial blood gas analysis was performed at the beginning of anesthesia and at each blood pressure condition.

RESULTS Mean ± SD PI values were 1.82 ± 2.38%, 1.17 ± 0.77%, and 1.71 ± 1.51% and mean PVI values were 16.00 ± 5.07%, 10.44 ± 3.55%, and 8.17 ± 3.49% for hypotensive, normotensive, and hypertensive conditions, respectively. The PI values did not differ significantly among blood pressure conditions. The PVI value for the hypotensive condition differed significantly from values for the normotensive and hypertensive conditions. The PVI values were significantly correlated with MAP (r = −0.657). The OR of hypotension to nonhypotension for PVI values ≥ 18% was 43.6.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE PVI was a clinically applicable variable determined by use of noninvasive methods in anesthetized tigers. Values of PVI ≥ 18% may indicate hypotension.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the effects of the concurrent administration of 70% N2O on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane in dogs, the MAC derivative that blocks motor movement (MACNM), and the MAC derivative that blocks autonomic responses (MACBAR).

Animals—7 adult sexually intact male mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—For each dog, anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane delivered via a face mask. Initially, the baseline MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR for sevoflurane were determined by use of a noxious stimulus (50 V, 50 Hz, and 10 milliseconds) applied subcutaneously over a midulnar region. Nitrous oxide (70%) was added to the breathing circuit, and MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR were determined again. Percentage changes from the respective baseline concentrations for MAC, MACNM’ and MACBAR were calculated after the administration of N2O.

Results—Baseline median values for the MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR for sevoflurane were 1.75%, 2.00%, and 2.50%, respectively. Addition of 70% N2O significantly decreased MAC, MACNM, and MACBAR by 24.4%, 25.0%, and 35.2%, respectively, and these values did not differ significantly from each other.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Supplementation with 70% N2O caused a clinically important and significant decrease in the MAC, MACNM’ and MACBAR for sevoflurane in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine effects of fentanyl, lidocaine, and a fentanyl-lidocaine combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane preventing motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

ANIMALS 6 adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane in oxygen 3 times (1-week intervals). Baseline MACNM (MACNM-B) was determined starting 45 minutes after induction of anesthesia. Dogs then received 1 of 3 treatments IV: fentanyl (loading dose, 15 μg/kg; constant rate infusion [CRI], 6 μg/kg/h), lidocaine (loading dose, 2 mg/kg; CRI, 6 mg/kg/h), and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination at the same doses. Determination of treatment MACNM (MACNM-T) was initiated 90 minutes after start of the CRI. Venous blood samples were collected at the time of each treatment MACNM measurement for determination of plasma concentrations of fentanyl and lidocaine.

RESULTS Mean ± SEM overall MACNM-B for the 3 treatments was 2.70 ± 0.27 vol%. The MACNM decreased from MACNM-B to MACNM-T by 39%, 21%, and 55% for fentanyl, lidocaine, and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination, respectively. This decrease differed significantly among treatments. Plasma fentanyl concentration was 3.25 and 2.94 ng/mL for fentanyl and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination, respectively. Plasma lidocaine concentration was 2,570 and 2,417 ng/mL for lidocaine and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination, respectively. Plasma fentanyl and lidocaine concentrations did not differ significantly between fentanyl and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination or between lidocaine and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CRIs of fentanyl, lidocaine, and the fentanyl-lidocaine combination at the doses used were associated with clinically important and significant decreases in the MACNM of sevoflurane in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of MgSO4, alone and in combination with propofol, on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement (MACNM) in sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy purpose-bred adult male Beagles (least squares mean ± SEM body weight, 12.0 ± 1.1 kg).

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized 3 times at weekly intervals. The MACNM was measured 45 minutes after induction of anesthesia (baseline; MACNM-B) and was determined each time by use of a noxious electrical stimulus. Treatments were administered as a loading dose and constant rate infusion (CRI) as follows: treatment 1, MgSO4 loading dose of 45 mg/kg and CRI of 15 mg/kg/h; treatment 2, propofol loading dose of 4 mg/kg and CRI of 9 mg/kg/h; and treatment 3, MgSO4 and propofol combination (same doses used previously for each drug). A mixed-model ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests were used to determine effects of each treatment on the percentage decrease from MACNM-B. Data were reported as least squares mean ± SEM values.

RESULTS Decrease from MACNM-B was 3.4 ± 3.1%, 48.3 ± 3.1%, and 50.3 ± 3.1%, for treatments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The decrease for treatments 2 and 3 was significantly different from that for treatment 1; however, no significant difference existed between results for treatments 2 and 3.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE MgSO4 did not affect MACNM, nor did it potentiate the effects of propofol on MACNM. Administration of MgSO4 in this study appeared to provide no clinical advantage as an anesthetic adjuvant.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate agreement among diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia for scores determined by use of a simple descriptive scale (SDS) or a composite grading scale (CGS) for quality of recovery of horses from anesthesia and to investigate use of 3-axis accelerometry (3AA) for objective evaluation of recovery.

ANIMALS 12 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Horses were fitted with a 3AA device and then were anesthetized. Eight diplomates evaluated recovery by use of an SDS, and 7 other diplomates evaluated recovery by use of a CGS. Agreement was tested with κ and AC1 statistics for the SDS and an ANOVA for the CGS. A library of mathematical models was used to map 3AA data against CGS scores.

RESULTS Agreement among diplomates using the SDS was slight (κ = 0.19; AC1 = 0.22). The CGS scores differed significantly among diplomates. Best fit of 3AA data against CGS scores yielded the following equation: RS = 9.998 × SG0.633 × ∑UG0.174, where RS is a horse's recovery score determined with 3AA, SG is acceleration of the successful attempt to stand, and ∑UG is the sum of accelerations of unsuccessful attempts to stand.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Subjective scoring of recovery of horses from anesthesia resulted in poor agreement among diplomates. Subjective scoring may lead to differences in conclusions about recovery quality; thus, there is a need for an objective scoring method. The 3AA system removed subjective bias in evaluations of recovery of horses and warrants further study.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research