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  • Author or Editor: Rebecca L. Remillard x
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Summary

Fifteen 2-week-old kittens were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 milk treatment groups as the sole source of nutrition for 4 weeks: queen's milk, commercially available kitten milk replacer (cmr), and an experimental milk replacer (exp). Kittens fed queen's milk suckled ad libitum, whereas cmr- and exp-fed kittens were tube-fed every 6 hours. Kittens were weaned at 6 weeks of age and were fed a feline growth diet ad libitum for an additional 4 weeks. Kittens were examined at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks of age; the procedure included an ophthalmic examination and blood sample collection for cbc and serum biochemical and amino acid analyses. Kittens fed cmr and exp diets had weight gain greater than that for queen's milk-fed kittens. The kittens fed cmr, however, had diarrhea throughout most of the milk-feeding trial and developed diffuse anterior and posterior lens opacification and vacuolation at the posterior Y-sutures. The lens opacities noticed in the kittens during the milk treatments resolved to a residual perinuclear halo, and a few incipient cortical opacities were observed by the end of the growth diet-feeding period. Serum arginine concentration was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) lower in the cmr-fed kittens, but was not different during the growth diet-feeding period. We concluded that the exp diet supported normal growth in 2- to 6-week-old kittens; cmr supported normal kitten growth rate, but resulted in diarrhea and cataract formation; and serum amino acid data indicated that low arginine concentration may have been related to the cmr-induced cataract formation.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

In a series of 3 studies, indirect blood pressure measurements were obtained to define normal variance, identify hypertension, and estimate the prevalence of hypertension in apparently healthy dogs. In part 1, we measured values in 5 clinically normal dogs twice weekly for 5 weeks in a home setting. Mean ± SD systolic arterial pressure (sap) and diastolic arterial pressure (dap) was 150 ± 16 and 86 ± 13 mm of Hg, respectively. The dap significantly (P < 0.01) decreased with repeated measurements over the 5-week period. In part 2, we assessed the variation between blood pressures measured in a clinic vs those measured in the home. Within a 2-week period, measurements were obtained from 10 clinically normal dogs in a private veterinary clinic and again in their home. Significant differences were not observed between clinic and home measurements of sap and dap; however, heart rate was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the clinic. In part 3, SD about the sap and dap mean values were determined in 102 clinically normal dogs. Canine hypertensive status was determined, using statistical methods and data from 102 clinically normal dogs. Values of sap > 202 mm of Hg and dap > 116 mm of Hg were determined to be 2 SD beyond the mean and, therefore, were interpreted to be hypertensive. Approximately 10% of the 102 apparently healthy dogs measured in this study were considered hypertensive on the basis of these criteria. In addition, a border zone of suspected hypertension was estimated, using the mean + 1.282 SD. The sap border zone was between 183 and 202 mm of Hg, whereas the dap border zone was between 102 and 113 mm of Hg. Of the 102 dogs, 12 had values within these zones of suspected hypertension.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research