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  • Author or Editor: Ray J. Geor x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare, in horses, estimates of insulin sensitivity obtained from minimal model analysis (MMA) of a frequently sampled IV glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) with estimates from the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC) and to evaluate the validity of surrogate estimates of insulin sensitivity derived from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT).

ANIMALS 18 mature Standardbreds (mean ± SD body weight, 428.9 ± 35.9 kg; mean ± SD body condition score, 4.4 ± 1.0 [on a scale of 1 to 9]).

PROCEDURES All horses underwent at least 2 of the 3 procedures (EHC [n = 15], insulin-modified FSIGTT [18], and OGTT [18]) within a 10-day time frame to evaluate insulin sensitivity.

RESULTS Insulin sensitivity variables derived from the EHC and FSIGTT were strongly correlated (r = 0.88). When standardized to the same units of measure, these measures were still strongly correlated (r = 0.86) but were not equivalent. Area under the curve, peak insulin concentration, insulin concentration at 120 minutes, and 2 calculated indices from glucose and insulin data from the OGTT were significantly correlated with the EHC- and FSIGTT-derived estimates of insulin sensitivity.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In healthy Standardbreds with moderate body condition score, insulin sensitivities from the EHC and FSIGTT were strongly correlated but not equivalent. Estimates derived from an OGTT also may be useful to estimate insulin sensitivity.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of dexamethasone on glucose dynamics and insulin sensitivity in healthy horses.

Animals—6 adult Standardbreds.

Procedures—In a balanced crossover study, horses received dexamethasone (0.08 mg/ kg, IV, q 48 h) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) during a 21-day period. Horses underwent a 3-hour frequently sampled IV glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) 2 days after treatment. Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data from FSIGTs were used to estimate insulin sensitivity (Si), glucose effectiveness (Sg), acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), and disposition index. Proxies for Si (reciprocal of the inverse square of basal insulin concentration [RISQI]) and beta-cell responsiveness (modified insulin-to-glucose ratio [MIRG]) were calculated from basal plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations.

Results—Mean serum insulin concentration was significantly higher in dexamethasone-treated horses than control horses on days 7, 14, and 21. Similarly, mean plasma glucose concentration was higher in dexamethasone-treated horses on days 7, 14, and 21; this value differed significantly on day 14 but not on days 7 or 21. Minimal model analysis of FSIGT data revealed a significant decrease in Si and a significant increase in AIRg after dexamethasone treatment, with no change in Sg or disposition index. Mean RISQI was significantly lower, whereas MIRG was higher, in dexamethasone-treated horses than control horses on days 7, 14, and 21.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The study revealed marked insulin resistance in healthy horses after 21 days of dexamethasone administration. Because insulin resistance has been associated with a predisposition to laminitis, a glucocorticoid-induced decrease in insulin sensitivity may increase risk for development of laminitis in some horses and ponies.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess a technique for laparoscopic collection of serial full-thickness small intestinal biopsy specimens in horses.

Animals—13 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—In the ex vivo portion of the study, sections of duodenum and jejunum obtained from 6 horses immediately after euthanasia were divided into 3 segments. Each segment was randomly assigned to the control group, the double-layer hand-sewn closure group, or the endoscopic linear stapler (ELS) group. Bursting strength and bursting wall tension were measured and compared among groups; luminal diameter reduction at the biopsy site was compared between the biopsy groups. In the in vivo portion of the study, serial full-thickness small intestinal biopsy specimens were laparoscopically collected with an ELS from the descending duodenum and distal portion of the jejunum at monthly intervals in 7 sedated, standing horses. Biopsy specimens were evaluated for suitability for histologic examination.

Results—Mean bursting strength and bursting wall tension were significantly lower in the ELS group than in the hand-sewn and control groups in both the duodenal and jejunal segments. Use of the hand-sewn closure technique at the biopsy site reduced luminal diameter significantly more than use of the stapling technique. In the in vivo part of the study, all 52 biopsy specimens collected during 26 laparoscopic procedures were suitable for histologic examination and no clinically important perioperative complications developed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic collection of serial full-thickness small intestinal biopsy specimens with a 45-mm ELS may be an effective and safe technique for use in healthy adult experimental horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate risk factors for the development of pasture- and endocrinopathy-associated laminitis (PEAL) in horses and ponies in North America.

DESIGN Case-control study.

ANIMALS 199 horses with incident cases of PEAL and 351 horses from 2 control populations (healthy horses [n = 198] and horses with lameness not caused by laminitis [153]) that were evaluated in North America between January 2012 and December 2015 by veterinarian members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

PROCEDURES North American members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners were contacted to participate in the study, and participating veterinarians provided historical data on incident cases of PEAL, each matched with a healthy control and a lameness control. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to compare data on PEAL-affected horses with data on horses from each set of controls.

RESULTS Horses with an obese body condition (ie, body condition score ≥ 7), generalized or regional adiposity (alone or in combination), preexisting endocrinopathy, or recent (within 30 days) glucocorticoid administration had increased odds of developing PEAL, compared with horses that did not have these findings.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The present study identified several risk factors for PEAL that may assist not only in managing and preventing this form of laminitis, but also in guiding future research into its pathogenesis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association