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  • Author or Editor: Raphael J. Zwijnenberg x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the anesthetic-sparing effects of perzinfotel when administered as a preanesthetic via IV, IM, or SC routes or IM in combination with butorphanol.

Animals—6 healthy sexually intact Beagles (4 males and 2 females; age, 18.5 to 31 months; body weight, 9.8 to 12.4 kg).

Procedures—After administration of a placebo, perzinfotel (10 to 30 mg/kg), or a perzinfotel-butorphanol combination, anesthesia was induced in dogs with propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. The following variables were continuously monitored: bispectral index; heart rate; systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures; end-tidal concentration of isoflurane; end-tidal partial pressure of CO2; oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry; rectal temperature; and inspiration and expiration concentrations of isoflurane. A noxious stimulation protocol was used, and the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined twice during anesthesia.

Results—IV, IM, and SC administration of perzinfotel alone decreased the mean isoflurane MAC values by 32% to 44% and significantly increased bispectral index values. A dose of 30 mg of perzinfotel/kg IM resulted in significant increases in heart rate and diastolic arterial blood pressure. The greatest MAC reduction (59%) was obtained with a combination of 20 mg of perzinfotel/kg IM and 0.2 mg of butorphanol/kg IM, whereas administration of butorphanol alone yielded a 15% reduction in the isoflurane MAC.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—SC, IM, or IV administration of perzinfotel prior to induction of isoflurane anesthesia improved anesthetic safety by reducing inhalant anesthetic requirements in healthy dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of perzinfotel, butorphanol, and their combination on the minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in cats.

Animals—7 healthy sexually intact cats (4 males and 3 females), aged 12 to 17 months and weighing 2.8 to 4.6 kg.

Procedures—In a crossover design, saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, perzinfotel (2.5 to 15 mg/kg; IV, IM, and SC), butorphanol tartrate (0.2 mg/kg, IM), or a combination of 5 mg of perzinfotel/kg and 2 mg of butorphanol tartrate/kg (both IM) was administered to 6 cats before 7 separate episodes of anesthesia with isoflurane in oxygen. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, bispectral index (BIS), and inspiration and expiration concentrations of isoflurane were continuously monitored. The isoflurane MAC was determined twice during anesthesia.

Results—IV, IM, and SC administration of perzinfotel at 2.5 to 15 mg/kg resulted in a significant decrease in mean isoflurane MAC by 43.3% to 68.0%. The BIS significantly increased after perzinfotel administration via the same routes at 2.5 to 15 mg/kg and after perzinfotelbutorphanol administration IM. Blood pressure was significantly higher after perzinfotel was administered at 5 mg/kg, IM; 10 mg/kg, IV; and 10 mg/kg, SC than after saline solution administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Perzinfotel administration decreased the isoflurane MAC and increased several BIS and blood pressure values in anesthetized cats. Administration of perzinfotel prior to isoflurane anesthesia may improve anesthetic safety by reducing inhalant anesthetic requirements and improving cardiovascular function during anesthesia. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1270–1276)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the use of a semi-invasive vascular access port (VAP) device or noninvasive oscillometry versus invasive telemetry for blood pressure measurements in cats.

Animals—6 healthy cats.

Procedures—30 days before the study, all cats received an implanted telemeter and a VAP device. During normotension and experimentally induced hypertension, blood pressure was measured with the implanted devices and with noninvasive oscillometry at 4 time points.

Results—Compared with invasive telemetry, VAP had a correlation coefficient from 0.8487 to 0.9972, and noninvasive oscillometry had a correlation coefficient from 0.7478 to 0.9689.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of the VAP device and noninvasive oscillometry had a high degree of correlation with invasive telemetry as the gold standard for blood pressure measurement. Use of a VAP device resulted in a slightly higher degree of correlation, compared with noninvasive oscillometry.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the ability of perzinfotel (an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) and a proprietary phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor to attenuate lameness in dogs with sodium urate (SU)–induced synovitis.

Animals—8 adult dogs.

Procedures—A blinded 4-way crossover study was performed. Dogs received perzinfotel (10 mg/kg), a proprietary PLA2 inhibitor (10 mg/kg), carprofen (4.4 mg/kg; positive control treatment), or no treatment (negative control treatment). On the fourth day after initiation of treatment, synovitis was induced via intra-articular injection of SU 1 hour before administration of the last treatment dose. Ground reaction forces were measured and clinical lameness evaluations were performed before (baseline [time 0]) and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 25 hours after SU injection. There was a 21-day washout period between subsequent treatments. Data were analyzed via repeated-measures ANOVAs.

Results—Peak vertical force (PVF) and vertical impulse (VI) values for negative control and perzinfotel treatments were significantly lower at 2 and 4 hours, compared with baseline values. Values for PVF and VI for the PLA2 inhibitor and positive control treatments did not differ from baseline values at any time points. Between-treatment comparisons revealed significantly higher PVF and VI values for the positive control treatment than for the negative control and perzinfotel treatments at 2 and 4 hours. Values for VI were higher for PLA2 inhibitor treatment than for negative control treatment at 2 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Perzinfotel did not significantly alter SU–induced lameness. The proprietary PLA2 inhibitor attenuated lameness but not as completely as did carprofen.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research