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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To review outcome of dogs with carpal flexural contracture deformities treated with rest alone or with rest and bandaging.

ANIMALS

47 dogs (75 joints).

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs with unilateral or bilateral carpal flexural contracture deformities were reviewed, and dogs were grouped according to deformity severity grade (graded on a scale from 1 to 3) at the time of diagnosis. Two treatment groups were compared: rest only and rest with a modified Robert-Jones bandage. All dogs were reevaluated weekly until recovery (ie, resolution of the deformity and lameness).

RESULTS

All dogs responded to conservative management, with all dogs regaining full extension of the antebrachiocarpal joint and ambulating normally at the time of the final visit. Mean ± SD time from initial diagnosis to recovery (ie, resolution of the deformity and lameness) was 2.9 ± 2.2 weeks (median, 2 weeks; range, 1 to 9 weeks). For dogs with grade 1 or 2 severity, mean time to recovery did not differ significantly between treatment groups. For dogs with grade 3 severity, however, mean time to recovery was significantly shorter for dogs treated with rest and bandaging than for dogs treated with rest alone.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that conservative management (rest alone or rest and bandaging) was a successful treatment option for puppies with carpal flexural contracture deformity and that bandaging resulted in a shorter time to recovery for dogs that were severely affected.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate and compare surface and cross-sectional structure as well as localized electrochemical corrosion and ion release for cast stainless steel (SS) tibia plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) plates retrieved from dogs with and without osteosarcoma (OSA) and to compare these findings with similar variables for forged SS TPLO plates retrieved from dogs.

SAMPLE 47 TPLO plates explanted from 45 client-owned dogs (22 cast plates from dogs with OSA, 22 cast plates from dogs without OSA, and 3 forged plates from dogs without OSA).

PROCEDURES Histologic evaluations of tissue samples collected from implant sites at the time of plate retrieval were performed to confirm implant site tumor status of each dog. Surfaces and metallographic cross sections of retrieved plates were examined, and the microcell technique was used to obtain local electrochemical corrosion and ion release measurements.

RESULTS Findings indicated that all cast SS plates demonstrated high spatial variability of their electrochemical surface properties and inhomogeneous superficial and cross-sectional composition, compared with forged plates. Greater metal ion release was observed in cast plates than in forged plates and in cast plates from dogs with OSA than in cast or forged from dogs without OSA.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that accumulation of metal ions from implants could be a trigger for neoplastic transformation in neighboring cells. Metal ion release caused by corrosion of implants that do not comply with recommended standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials International or the International Organization for Standardization could potentially place patients at increased risk of tumor development.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the material properties of Slocum TPLO plates and assess the soft tissue reaction adjacent to these plates in dogs that had undergone tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

Sample Population—3 new TPLO plates, 8 retrieved TPLO plates, and 1 new Synthes dynamic compression plate.

Procedures—Metallurgic analyses were performed. Tissue samples were obtained from areas adjacent to retrieved plates and submitted for histologic examination.

Results—All of the TPLO plates had a 2-phase microstructure consisting of austenite and ferrite in various amounts. Residua, inclusions, and cavities were seen during microscopic examination of the plate surface. The major differences between new and retrieved TPLO plates were the presence of small gaps separating many inclusions from the surrounding matrix and the presence of various-sized pits on the surface of the retrieved plates. The dynamic compression plate had a nearly pure austenitic structure and was largely free from residua, inclusions, and cavities. Histologic examination of tissue samples obtained from areas adjacent to retrieved TPLO plates revealed intra- and extracellular particulate debris. Two types of particles (one consisting of chromium, nickel, molybdenum, and iron and the other consisting of aluminum and silicon) were seen.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results determined that new and retrieved TPLO plates were manufactured from 316L stainless steel and produced by a casting process, but not all plates met specifications for chemical composition of cast surgical implants (American Society for Testing Materials standard F745); tissues surrounding retrieved plates had evidence of adverse reactions, probably as a result of plate corrosion.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-year-old German Shorthaired Pointer was evaluated for possible reconstruction of a mandibular defect resulting from gunshot trauma.

Clinical Findings—A 5-cm defect of the right mandibular body was evident. A segment of the mandibular body was removed 9 weeks earlier because of severe contamination and comminution associated with gunshot trauma. Subsequent right-sided mandibular drift resulted in malocclusion in which the left mandibular canine tooth caused trauma to mucosa of the hard palate medial to the left maxillary canine tooth. The right maxillary canine tooth caused trauma to gingiva lingual to the right mandibular canine tooth.

Treatment and Outcome—The right mandible was stabilized with a 2.0-mm maxillofacial miniplate positioned along the lateral alveolar margin and a 2.4-mm locking mandibular reconstruction plate placed along the ventrolateral mandible. An absorbable compressionresistant matrix containing collagen, hydroxyapatite, and tricalcium phosphate was soaked in recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2; 7.2 mL of a 0.5 mg/mL solution for a dose of 3.6 mg) and placed in the defect. By 4 weeks after surgery, an exuberant callus was evident at the site of the defect. By 7 months after surgery, the callus had remodeled, resulting in normal appearance, normal occlusion, and excellent function of the jaw.

Clinical Relevance—Mandibular defects resulting from gunshot trauma can be treated by removal of contaminated tissue and comminuted bone fragments, followed by staged reconstruction. The combination of rhBMP-2 and compression-resistant matrix was effective in a staged mandibular reconstruction in a dog with a severe traumatic mandibular defect.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 3-year-old 19-kg (42-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was referred after being hit by a car. Injuries included pneumothorax, hemothorax, pulmonary contusions, a full-thickness axillary skin wound, and a grade I transverse fracture of the midshaft of the right humerus. Following patient stabilization, open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture were performed. The dog had weight-bearing lameness at the time of discharge. Eight days after fracture repair, the dog was reevaluated for acute onset of signs of pain and non–weight-bearing lameness in the right forelimb.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination findings in the right forelimb (knuckling and coolness, with absent digital pulses) were suggestive of a thrombus. Ultrasonography confirmed a right brachial artery thrombus with minimal blood flow to the affected limb.

Treatment and Outcome—Unfractionated heparin was administered via continuous IV infusion for the first 36 hours of hospitalization. Clopidogrel administration was also started at this time. During hospitalization, rapid clinical improvement occurred, and the dog was discharged 48 hours after admission. The transition to outpatient therapy was achieved by discontinuation of the unfractionated heparin infusion at 36 hours and beginning SC administration of dalteparin. Outpatient treatment with dalteparin and clopidogrel was continued. Repeated physical examination and ultrasonography 5 weeks later revealed resolution of the thrombus and normal blood flow to the limb. Anticoagulant administration was discontinued at that time.

Clinical Relevance—Thrombosis should be suspected in any dog with signs of acute pain after severe trauma or fracture repair, with or without concurrent lameness, that do not resolve with appropriate treatment. Restoration of blood flow to the affected limb after initiation of unfractionated heparin and clopidogrel administration followed by outpatient treatment with dalteparin and clopidogrel was achieved in this case.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate 2 plate designs for pancarpal arthrodesis and their effects on load transfer to the respective bones as well as to develop a computational model with directed input from the biomechanical testing of the 2 constructs.

Sample—Both forelimbs from the cadaver of an adult castrated male Golden Retriever.

Procedures—CT imaging was performed on the forelimb pair. Each forelimb was subsequently instrumented with a hybrid dynamic compression plate or a castless pancarpal arthrodesis plate. Biomechanical testing was performed. The forelimbs were statically loaded in the elastic range and then cyclically loaded to failure. Finite element (FE) modeling was used to compare the 2 plate designs with respect to bone and implant stress distribution and magnitude when loaded.

Results—Cyclic loading to failure elicited failure patterns similar to those observed clinically. The mean ± SD error between computational and experimental strain was < 15% ± 13% at the maximum loads applied during static elastic loading. The highest bone stresses were at the distal extent of the metacarpal bones at the level of the screw holes with both plates; however, the compression plate resulted in slightly greater stresses than did the arthrodesis plate. Both models also revealed an increase in bone stress at the proximal screw position in the radius. The highest plate stress was identified at the level of the radiocarpal bone, and an increased screw stress (junction of screw head with shaft) was identified at both the most proximal and distal ends of the plates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The FE model successfully approximated the biomechanical characteristics of an ex vivo pancarpal plate construct for comparison of the effects of application of different plate designs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research