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  • Author or Editor: Randy J. Boudrieau x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Ultrasonography of the surgical sites of 15 dogs was performed 3 to 8 days after they underwent major orthopedic surgical procedures. Eight dogs were suspected of having incision-site complications on the basis of localized signs of pain, heat, or swelling and clinical signs of pyrexia, lethargy, or anorexia. Seven dogs had apparently normal healing of the incision. Ultrasonography was used to assess and compare the character of fluid accumulation, to detect fluid accumulation associated with evidence of distal enhancement, and to evaluate gas accumulation and disruption of muscle fibers. Ultrasonography of the 8 dogs with complications of the incision site revealed fluid accumulation (8 dogs), distal enhancement associated with fluid accumulations (2), disruption of muscle fibers (1), and gas accumulation (1). Ultrasonography of the 7 dogs with apparently normal healing of the incisions revealed fluid accumulations (2 dogs), fluid between fascial planes (4), disruption of muscle fibers (1), and gas accumulation (1). Aspirates of fluid were obtained from 7 dogs with suspected incision-site infection. Analysis of results of cytologic evaluation or bacterial culturing confirmed infection in 6 dogs and indicated that 1 dog had a sterile hematoma. Ultrasonography is a sensitive technique for the detection and localization of fluid accumulations; however, the detection of fluid accumulations was not limited to dogs with incision-site complications. Fluid accumulations can be evaluated by use of ultrasound-guided needle aspiration, which has few associated negative side-effects. During the early postoperative period, results for fluid evaluation of samples obtained by use of accurately placed aspiration needles can be used to serve as a guide for further treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary:

A randomized, double-blind, controlled study was performed with 18 arthritic dogs administered aspirin (25 mg/kg of body weight, po, q 8 h) and excipient (control group) or aspirin and misoprostol (100 μg, po, q 8 h). Dogs in the misoprostol (n = 10) and control (n = 8) groups were primarily compared by use of sequential gastroduodenoscopy, changes in pcv, and prevalence of clinical signs of gastrointestinal disturbance over a 14-day treatment period. The misoprostol/aspirin-treated group had significantly (P < 0.05) less gastroduodenal hemorrhage and ulceration and a significantly (P < 0.05) lower prevalence of vomiting than did the control group.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 12 dogs with lesions of the brain (3 cats, 2 dogs) or vertebral canal (10 dogs) that underwent intraoperative ultrasonography were reviewed. Ultrasonography was performed after craniotomy, a ventral slot procedure, or laminectomy, using a real-time sector scanner with a 7.5- or 10-MHz transducer. In the 3 cats and 2 dogs with brain lesions, cerebral masses were hyperechoic, compared with normal brain, and were easily located. In the 2 dogs, ultrasonography was necessary to localize deep-seated cerebral lesions that could not be seen following craniotomy. In 7 dogs that underwent a ventral slot procedure because of prolapse of an intervertebral disk, ultrasonography was successfully used to assess completeness of disk removal. The remaining 3 dogs underwent dorsal laminectomy because intradural enlargement of the spinal cord (1 dog) or an intradural mass (2 dogs) could be seen myelographically. In the 2 dogs with intradural masses, intraoperative ultrasonography helped to delineate the extent of the tumor. In the third dog, spinal cord swelling was seen ultrasonographically; the histologic diagnosis was spinal cord edema.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

From the medical records of 124 dogs, patellar luxations were classified as congenital or acquired, medial or lateral, and unilateral or bilateral; were graded 1 to 4; and were subdivided according to size of dog. The 4 breed-size categories were based on guidelines from American Kennel Club standards for adult height and weight. Findings from these records were compared with the results from dogs with other orthopedic problems.

A majority of dogs had congenital (91; 82%), as opposed to acquired (17; 15%) patellar luxations. Distribution of dogs with patellar luxations according to breed size included 54 (98%) with medial patellar luxations (mpl) and 1 (2%) with lateral patellar luxation (lpl) in small breeds, 17 (81%) with mpl and 4 (19%) with lpl in medium breeds, 35 (83%) with mpl and 7 (17%) with lpl in large breeds; and 4 (67%) with mpl and 2 (33%) with lpl in giant breeds. Medial patellar luxation was observed in 110 dogs and 14 dogs had lpl. Cases of mpl and lpl in the same stifle or of medial and lateral patellar luxation in contralateral stifles in the same dog were not observed. Surgical correction was performed primarily in dogs with grade-3 and grade-4 patellar luxations.

Medial patellar luxations and lpl were detected in all breed categories. Small-breed dogs were admitted almost exclusively with mpl. Lateral patellar luxation was found uncommonly; however, it was observed more often in larger-breed dogs. Prevalence of mpl was greater, when compared with that for lpl, in every size/breed category.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association