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  • Author or Editor: Rachael Kreisler x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine complication rates for elective gonadectomy procedures performed by veterinary students on dogs and cats in an animal shelter, characterize these complications, and compare rates with those for shelter-employed veterinarians (SEVs).

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS 10,073 dogs and cats for which gonadectomy was performed by a veterinary student (n = 3,048 surgeries) or SEV (7,025 surgeries) at an urban animal shelter over a 16-month period.

PROCEDURES Electronic medical records for included dogs and cats were reviewed and data collected regarding patient signalment, duration of gonadectomy, surgeon type (student or SEV), and types of surgical complications recorded (including death or euthanasia) during the period from anesthetic induction to 72 hours after surgery. Complication and mortality rates were compared between veterinary students and SEVs.

RESULTS No significant differences were identified between students and SEVs regarding rates of overall complications for both species, minor complications for both species, major complications for both species, and overall complications for dogs or cats specifically. The most common complications were self-limiting, with no long-term consequences, for both students and SEVs. Differences in mortality rates between students and SEVs could not be definitively determined owing to low numbers of nonsurviving patients.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE With judicious case selection and as a part of a surgical training program, complication rates for veterinary student–performed gonadectomy procedures for dogs and cats were no different from those for SEV-performed gonadectomy procedures. We believe such information regarding patient outcomes will allow shelter staff to make informed decisions and help them in discussions with stakeholders who may have concerns about student participation.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare results from 2 previously published surveys aimed at determining how pyometra is treated in high-quality, high-volume spay-neuter clinics (HQHVSNCs) and private practices (PPs), with a specific focus on identifying opportunities for partnership between the clinic types to improve access to care in pyometra treatment.

SAMPLE

Responses from 123 PPs and 87 HQHVSNCs.

METHODS

A previously published survey of PPs conducted from June to July 2021 and a similar previously published survey of HQHVSNCs conducted from June to July 2020 were compared regarding demographics, pyometra treatment availability, estimated outcome, alternative outcome, disruption, cost, and protocol between HQHVSNCs and PPs. A comparison was also run of the surveys’ responses regarding referral of a pyometra to an HQHVSNC by a PP.

RESULTS

Although PPs estimated that economic euthanasia is the most likely alternative outcome for 13% of patients unable to access care at their practice, 80% would be reluctant to refer to an HQHVSNC. The 3 primary reasons indicated by PPs with a reluctance to refer were a perceived lack of prompt appointment availability (20%), lack of aftercare (18%), and lack of adequate equipment (14%). In contrast, most HQHVSNCs estimated that they generally accept referrals the same day (50%) or the next day (30%) and 95% of HQHVSNCs reported having the resources needed to treat most pyometras.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

There are several opportunities for partnership between PPs and HQHVSNCs in the treatment of pyometra. The most frequent concerns expressed by PPs regarding referral to HQHVSNCs were not shared by HQHVSNCs or could be ameliorated by referral to an HQHVSNC for surgery and transfer back to the PP for aftercare.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate temporal changes in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations in dogs with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis and assess their utility to detect remission.

METHODS

31 client-owned dogs with newly diagnosed pulmonary coccidioidomycosis from October 2020 to February 2021 were included in a retrospective cohort study that utilized archived serum. Serum was originally obtained at diagnosis and once every 3 months after antifungal administration until either remission or 12 months. Time points were designated as baseline (T0), 3 months (T1), 6 months (T2), 9 months (T3), and 12 months (T4). Serum CRP and Hp were measured at a reference laboratory with ELISA assays.

RESULTS

Median serum CRP and Hp concentrations decreased from T0 (CRP, 56 mg/L; Hp, 716.1 mg/dL) to T1 (CRP, 3.3 mg/L; Hp, 240.5 mg/dL); subsequent decreases were not significant. Eighteen (60%) and 16 (53%) of 30 dogs had normal serum CRP and Hp concentrations at T1, respectively. Absolute serum CRP (AUC, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.72) and Hp (AUC, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.78) were poor detectors of remission. However, the percentage change in Hp from T0 to T1 (AUC, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.0) was an excellent predictor of remission within 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS

Serum CRP and Hp concentrations decrease in the first 3 months of antifungal treatment in dogs with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis, and the percentage change of Hp may help predict dogs that will achieve remission within 12 months of treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Serum CRP and Hp may be useful adjunctive biomarkers to monitor treatment response in dogs with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify prognostic indicators and inflammatory markers associated with nonsurvival in dogs with gallbladder mucoceles (GBMs) following cholecystectomy and to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin concentrations in dogs with GBMs compared to healthy controls.

ANIMALS

25 dogs that underwent cholecystectomy for removal of GBM and 20 healthy control dogs.

METHODS

A prospective, multicenter cohort study. Survival outcomes to hospital discharge and 2 weeks postdischarge were recorded from medical records. Laboratory variables, inflammatory markers (CRP and haptoglobin), and 25-hydroxyvitamin(OH) D (25[OH]D) concentrations were measured preoperatively. Associations between signalment, clinicopathologic variables, acute patient physiologic and laboratory evaluation (APPLEFAST) scores, inflammatory markers, 25(OH)D concentration, and survival were analyzed using logistic regression.

RESULTS

76% (19/25) and 68% (17/25) of dogs survived to hospital discharge and 2 weeks postdischarge, respectively. For each additional year of age, the odds of nonsurvival in hospital and 2 weeks postdischarge increased by 2.2 (P = .01; 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.0) and 1.7 (P = .04; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.2), respectively. Intraoperative systolic blood pressure ≤ 65 mm Hg increased the probability of nonsurvival in hospital (P < .04). Gallbladder perforation, APPLEFAST scores, and preoperative serum concentrations of CRP, haptoglobin, and 25(OH)D were not associated with survival. Serum CRP and haptoglobin concentrations were greater in dogs with GBM compared to controls (P < .001).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Increasing age and intraoperative systolic blood pressure ≤ 65 mm Hg were associated with nonsurvival in dogs with GBM undergoing cholecystectomy. Serum CRP, haptoglobin, and 25(OH)D were not associated with nonsurvival postcholecystectomy in this sample population.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association