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Summary

The efficacy of paste and granule formulations of pyrantel pamoate against concurrent infections of Toxocara cati and Ancylostoma tubaeforme in cats was examined in a controlled trial. Three groups of 8 cats received either no medication (controls) or pyrantel pamoate in paste or granule formulations at a dosage of 20 mg/kg of body weight. After administration of the paste formulation, fecal egg counts of A tubaeforme and T cati were decreased by 98.6 and 96.4%, respectively, and 100% of hookworms and 93.5% of ascarids were removed from the intestine. After administration of the granule formulation, fecal egg counts of A tubaeforme and T cati were decreased by 99.4 and 78.2%, respectively, and 100% of adult hookworms and 88.9% of ascarids were removed. All reductions of egg counts and worm numbers were significant (P < 0.01).

The clinical safety of pyrantel pamoate was evaluated in 4- to 6-week-old kittens. Three groups of 10 kittens received either no medication (controls) or pyrantel pamoate in paste or granule formulations at the rate of 100 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days. Adverse effects were not observed in young kittens following administration of the high dose of pyrantel pamoate.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

A double-blind study was conducted to compare gastri ulcer healing time in nontreated dogs with that in dogs treated with either cimetidine or omeprazole. Single ulcers were created in the gastric antrum by use of a suction biopsy capsule. Each dog was given 25 mg of aspirin/kg of body weight orally for 20 days after ulcer induction. Five control dogs were given aspirin only (no anti-ulcer medication) during the 20-day study. Six dogs were given cimetidine at dosage of 10 mg/kg orally every 8 hours, and 6 dogs were given omeprazole orally at dosage of 2 μmol/kg (0.7 mg/kg) once daily. All dogs were examined endoscopically on days 5, 10, 15, and 20 and were given a score for the size of the mechanically created ulcer and a score for the degree of aspirin-induced gastritis. All dogs were euthanatized on day 21, and gastric lesions were examined histologically. Significant differences were not evident in ulcer healing scores or degree of aspirin-induced gastritis among treated and nontreated dogs on days 5, 10, 15, and 20. However, aspirin-induced gastritis was less severe in dogs of the omeprazole group than in dogs of the cimetidine or control group on each day observations were made. The effect of omeprazole given once daily was comparable with that of cimetidine given every 8 hours in lessening aspirin-induced gastritis.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether substantial interobserver variation exists among diagnostic pathologists for descriptions of intestinal mucosal cell populations and whether histopathologic descriptions accurately predict when a patient does not have clinically evident intestinal disease.

Design—Comparative survey.

Sample Population—14 histologic slides of duodenal, ileal, or colonic tissue from 10 dogs and 3 cats.

Procedure—Each histologic slide was evaluated independently by 5 pathologists at 4 institutions. Pathologists, who had no knowledge of the tissues' origin, indicated whether slides were adequate for histologic evaluation and whether the tissue was normal or abnormal. They also identified the main infiltrating cell type in specimens that were considered abnormal, and whether infiltrates were mild, moderate, severe, or neoplastic.

Results—Quality of all slides was considered adequate or superior by at least 4 of the 5 pathologists. For intensity of mucosal cellular infiltrates, there was uniformity of opinion for 1 slide, near-uniformity for 6 slides, and nonuniformity for 7 slides. Five dogs did not have clinical evidence of intestinal disease, yet the pathologists' descriptions indicated that their intestinal tissue specimens were abnormal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Substantial interobserver variation was detected. Standardization of pathologic descriptions of intestinal tissue is necessary for meaningful comparisons with published articles. Clinicians must be cautious about correlating clinical signs and histopathologic descriptions of intestinal biopsy specimens. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1177–1182)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association