Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Qi Wang x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the changes in concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in the precorneal tear film of dogs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa–associated keratitis during corneal healing and stromal remodeling.

Animals—10 dogs with unilateral P aeruginosa–associated keratitis and 10 clinically normal dogs.

Procedures—Precorneal tear film samples were collected from both eyes of 10 dogs with unilateral P aeruginosa–associated keratitis on the day of admission to the hospital and then at various time points until complete healing of the cornea was achieved. Precorneal tear film samples were also collected from both eyes of 10 clinically normal adult dogs (control group). Concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in precorneal tear film samples from each group were determined via gelatin zymography for comparison.

Results—The proteolytic processes in the ulcerated eyes decreased as corneal healing progressed. On the day of admission, concentrations of latent and active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in ulcerated eyes were significantly higher than values in the contralateral unaffected eyes in dogs with P aeruginosa–associated keratitis; concentrations of latent MMP-2 and MMP-9 were also greater than control group values. Concentrations of latent and active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the healed eyes of dogs with P aeruginosa–associated keratitis were significantly lower than concentrations in the ulcerated eyes on the day of admission.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that reduction of precorneal tear film concentrations of MMPs by use of proteinase inhibitors may be effective in the treatment of dogs with P aeruginosa–associated keratitis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate and compare circulating concentrations of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), insulin, and glucose in nondiabetic cats classified by body condition score (BCS) and in cats with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus.

Animals—109 (82 nondiabetic, 21 nonketoacidotic diabetic, and 6 ketoacidotic diabetic) cats.

Procedures—Cats were examined and BCSs were assessed on a scale of 1 to 9. After food was withheld for 12 hours, blood was collected and plasma concentrations of IAPP and serum concentrations of insulin and glucose were measured. Differences in these values were evaluated among nondiabetic cats grouped according to BCS and in diabetic cats grouped as ketoacidotic or nonketoacidotic on the basis of clinicopathologic findings. Correlations were determined among variables.

Results—In nondiabetic cats, BCS was significantly and positively correlated with circulating IAPP and insulin concentrations. Mean plasma IAPP concentrations were significantly different between cats with BCSs of 5 and 7, and mean serum insulin concentrations were significantly different between cats with BCSs of 5 and 8. Serum glucose concentrations were not significantly different among nondiabetic cats. Mean IAPP concentrations were similar between nonketoacidotic diabetic cats and nondiabetic cats with BCSs of 8 or 9. Mean IAPP concentrations were significantly reduced in ketoacidotic diabetic cats, compared with those of nondiabetic cats with BCSs of 6 through 8 and of nonketoacidotic diabetic cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that increased BCS (a measure of obesity) is associated with increased circulating concentrations of IAPP and insulin in nondiabetic cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research