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  • Author or Editor: Phillip L. Chapman x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of sedation achieved by xylazine (XYL) or acepromazine (ACE) on cardiopulmonary function and uterine blood flow in cows in late gestation.

Animals—8 cows between 219 and 241 days of gestation.

Procedure—Doses of ACE (0.02 mg/kg) or XYL (0.04 mg/kg) were administered IV. Measurements were obtained to determine cardiopulmonary effects and oxygen delivery to the uterus.

Results—Heart rate was not significantly affected by administration of ACE, but it decreased markedly after administration of XYL. Uterine artery flow was decreased at all times by XYL and was always less than for ACE. Xylazine increased uterine vascular resistance through 30 minutes and caused reduced PaO2 and increased PaCO2 at all time periods. Acepromazine caused a 5% decrease in PaO2 only at 5 minutes. Xylazine reduced oxygen delivery by 59% at 5 minutes and 32% at 45 minutes. In contrast, ACE caused a nonsignificant reduction of oxygen delivery by 16% at 15 minutes and a return to baseline values by 45 minutes

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Xylazine markedly reduces flow and availability of oxygenated blood to the uterus, which may critically impair delivery of oxygen to the fetus at a stressful and important time of development or delivery. Acepromazine was associated with slight reductions of much shorter duration. When XYL is used to sedate pregnant cows, it could impose physiologic distress on the fetus and potentially increase fetal morbidity and mortality. When sedation of the dam is desirable, ACE could be an alternative to XYL. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1695–1699)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare recoveries from anesthesia of horses placed on a conventional padded stall floor or on a specially designed air pillow.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—409 horses (> 1 year old) that were anesthetized for surgical procedures during a 37-month period.

Procedures—By random allocation, horses were allowed to recover from anesthesia in either a foammat–padded recovery stall or an identical recovery stall equipped with a rapidly inflating-deflating air pillow. All recoveries were videotaped for subsequent analysis by an independent evaluator. Times to first movement, first attempt to attain sternal recumbency, attainment of sternal recumbency, first attempt to stand, and successful standing were recorded. The numbers of attempts before achieving sternal recumbency and standing were counted, and scores for quality of standing and overall recovery were assigned. Recovery-related variables were compared between groups.

Results—Compared with horses allowed to recover in a conventional manner, horses that recovered from anesthesia on the air pillow had a significantly longer rest period before attempting to attain sternal recumbency and rise to standing. Once the pillow was deflated, horses were able to stand after significantly fewer attempts and the quality of their standing was significantly better. Between the 2 groups of horses, there was no significant difference in overall recovery quality scores. The air pillow and padded floor systems were equally safe.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that use of a rapidly inflating-deflating air pillow promotes a longer period of recumbency and a better quality of standing after anesthesia in horses.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To elucidate the species and biovariants of Pasteurellaceae isolated from clinically normal bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) or bighorn sheep with evidence of respiratory disease.

Sample—675 Pasteurellaceae isolates from 290 free-ranging bighorn sheep in Idaho, Oregon and Wyoming.

Procedures—Nasal and oropharyngeal swab specimens were inoculated onto selective and nonselective blood agar media. Representatives of each colony type were classified via a biovariant scheme. The association of respective β-hemolytic isolates with respiratory disease was evaluated via χ2 analyses.

Results—Bacterial isolates belonged to 4 species: Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia (Pasteurella) trehalosi. Within the latter 3 species, 112 subspecies, biotypes, and biovariants were identified. Bibersteinia trehalosi 2 and B trehalosi 2B constituted 345 of 675 (51%) isolates. Most (597/618 [97%]) isolates from adult sheep were from clinically normal animals, whereas most (47/57 [82%]) isolates from lambs were from animals with evidence of respiratory disease. Twenty-two Pasteurellaceae biovariants were isolated from sheep with respiratory disease; 17 of these biovariants were also isolated from clinically normal sheep. The ability of isolates to cause β-hemolysis on blood agar was associated with respiratory disease in adult bighorn sheep (OR, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 6.07).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bighorn lambs appeared more susceptible to respiratory disease caused by Pasteurellaceae than did adult sheep. β-Hemolytic Pasteurellaceae isolates were more likely to be associated with respiratory disease than were non–β-hemolytic isolates in adult sheep. Identification of Pasteurellaceae with the greatest pathogenic potential will require studies to estimate the risk of disease from specific biovariants.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine cross-reactivity of aeroallergens in Colorado and surrounding states by evaluating concurrent positive reactions of related and nonrelated allergens of intradermal tests in dogs.

Sample Population—Intradermal test results of 268 atopic dogs.

Procedure—A retrospective evaluation of skin test results for 268 dogs was performed. Pairs of closely related and nonrelated allergens were evaluated. Group 1 consisted of closely related allergens with demonstrated antibody cross-reactivity in humans. In group 2, allergens of the same plant group (ie, trees, grasses, or weeds) that were not closely related were paired. In group 3, allergen pairs were of different plant groups. Plant allergens were paired with dust mite allergens, animal dander, or mold spores in group 4. In the last group, allergens not derived from plants were paired. Data were evaluated twice by use of a different definition of a positive reaction. Significance of the difference between group means of log odds ratios was estimated by use of a bootstrap percentile confidence interval.

Results—Significant differences in the number of concurrent positive reactions were not found between related versus nonrelated grass, weed, or tree allergens. Significant differences in the number of concurrent positive reactions were found between plant allergens of different groups (ie, grasses, weeds, and trees) and plant allergens of the same groups, related or nonrelated , as well as between plant-derived and nonplant-derived allergens. Many dogs reacting to a specific allergen did not react to a closely related allergen at the same time.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—These results provide evidence against clinically relevant cross-reactivity and suggest that allergen-specific immunotherapy should be formulated on the basis of single allergen test results. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:874–879)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a method of aerobic bacteriologic culture of epidermal collarette specimens from dogs with superficial pyoderma and compare results with those for aerobic bacteriologic culture of abdominal skin specimens in healthy dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—22 dogs with epidermal collarettes and 24 healthy dogs.

Procedure–Dry sterile cotton swabs were rolled across epidermal collarettes or hairless areas of abdominal skin in healthy dogs and submitted for aerobic bacteriologic culture. Hemolytic colonies of gram-positive–staining cocci were tested for catalase production, and if results were positive, a coagulase test was performed. Colonies with coagulase activity were tested for the ability to ferment mannitol. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all Staphylococcus spp that were isolated.

ResultsS intermedius was isolated from collarettes in 18 of 22 dogs with superficial pyoderma but not from healthy dogs. Estimated sensitivity and specificity of the culture method were 81.8% and 100%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the ability to culture S intermedius, the number of S intermedius isolates without resistance to antimicrobials, and the number of S intermedius isolates resistant to penicillin G when comparing dogs with superficial pyoderma for the first time and dogs with recurrent pyoderma, dogs that did or did not receive concurrent antimicrobials, and dogs with and without underlying allergic disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance–Bacteriologic culture of epidermal collarette specimens was a simple and reliable method for identification of S intermedius in dogs with superficial pyoderma, regardless of history of pyoderma or current antimicrobial use. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:904–908)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of morphine in llamas.

Animals—6 healthy adult llamas.

Procedures—Llamas received morphine sulfate in a randomized crossover design. In phase 1, they received IV or IM administration of morphine at 0.05 or 0.5 mg/kg, respectively; in phase 2, they received IV administration of morphine at 0.05, 0.25, or 0.5 mg/kg. Plasma morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide concentrations were determined by validated methods. Body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, sedation, and analgesia were assessed and compared with plasma concentrations by regression analysis.

Results—Total body clearance was similar between IV administration of morphine sulfate at 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg (mean ± SD, 25.3 ± 6.9 mL/min/kg and 27.3 ± 5.9 mL/min/kg, respectively), and linearity was demonstrated between these doses. Bioavailability of morphine following IM administration at 0.5 mg/kg was 120 ± 30%. Body temperature and sedation increased as the dose of morphine administered increased. Heart rate was unaffected by varying doses. Respiratory rate decreased as dose increased. Analgesia was difficult to assess as a result of high individual variability. Intravenous administration of morphine at 0.25 mg/kg provided the most consistent increase in tolerance to electric stimulation. Pharmacodynamic modeling revealed a sigmoidal relationship between plasma concentration and sedation score.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Morphine was characterized by a large apparent volume of distribution and high systemic clearance in llamas. A prolonged half-life was observed with IM injection. Intravenous administration of morphine sulfate at 0.25 mg/kg every 4 hours is suggested for further study.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research