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  • Author or Editor: Philippe R. Hennet x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine the apical anatomy of canine teeth in cats.

Sample Population

70 permanent canine teeth of cats.

Procedure

The teeth were extracted, cleaned, and radiographed, and the root canals were stained with India ink, then cleared in methyl salicylate. The apical root canal anatomy was studied by examining dental radiographs and microscopic measurements performed on the cleared specimens.

Results

Apical root canal anatomy in cats has the same "sprinkler-rose" appearance as seen in dogs. The mean length of the radiodense apex on radiographs was 2.8 ± 1.2 mm. The mean lengths of the apical ramifications were 1.9 ± 0.4 and 1.6 ± 0.4 mm for upper and lower canine teeth, respectively; mean numbers of apical ramifications were 13 ± 6 and 12 + 5, respectively; and mean ratios (length of ramifications/length of root) were 0.16 ± 0.03 and 0.15 ± 0.04, respectively. There was significant (P < 0.05) difference in the length of apical ramifications between upper and lower canine teeth and significant (P < 0.05) positive correlation between the length of the root and the length of apical ramifications for all canine teeth.

Conclusion

Primary apical foramen is not present in mature canine teeth of cats.

Clinical Relevance

There is little risk of apical penetration by files during endodontic therapy of canine teeth of cats; however, the multiple foramina require that apical instrumentation is thorough to prevent soft tissue remnants causing failure of the procedure. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1545–1548)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To measure production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) responsible for halitosis on the crown surface of the maxillary fourth premolar of dogs with gingivitis.

Animals

28 dogs owned by veterinary students who complained that their dogs had halitosis.

Procedure

Clinical dental indices (plaque index, calculus index, and gingival index) were measured on the most diseased maxillary fourth premolar tooth. Production of VSC from the crown surface of the tooth was recorded by use of a portable sulfide monitor. Measurements were performed several times on each dog over a 2-month period, resulting in 98 series of measurements.

Results

Dogs with heavy amounts of plaque or calculus (plaque and calculus indices of 2 or 3) had significantly higher VSC readings than did dogs with no visible plaque and calculus accumulation. Significant (P = 0.0008) correlation was found between VSC measurements and plaque index, and significant correlations were found between VSC measurements and calculus index (P = 0.00118) and gingival index (P = 0.00475).

Conclusion

VSC production recorded on the crown of maxillary fourth premolar teeth of dogs with gingivitis is significantly correlated with the amount of plaque and calculus accumulation and with severity of gingivitis.

Clinical Relevance

VSC measurements on tooth surfaces could be used as a site-specific method to assess, in conjunction with clinical dental variables, effectiveness of dental hygiene products. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:255–257)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association