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Abstract

In this, the fourth and final article in his series on compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, Mr. Seibert discusses the requirements for emergency action and fire prevention plans.—Kurt J. Matushek, Assistant Editor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

This is the third article in a series prepared for us by Mr. Seibert. For previous articles, please see the Jan 15,1994 and the Feb 1,1994 issues of the JAVMA.—Kurt J. Matushek, Assistant Editor.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The large number of responses to our first Practitioners’ Exchange question (see Sept 1, 1993 issue of the JAVMA) suggests that veterinarians are concerned about complying with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, but that many veterinarians are uncertain how best to set up an OSHA compliance program in their own hospitals. With this issue, we present the first in a series of articles dealing with OSHA regulations and giving practical ways for veterinarians to comply with the OSHA standards. In future articles, the author will discuss some of the common hazards in veterinary hospitals, implementation of a hazard communication plan, and development of a hospital emergency action plan.

While reading these articles, remember that, although they represent the best information available at the time they were written, they cannot be considered definitive. Regulations are subject to change, and, in the end, only personnel from OSHA can tell you exactly how to comply with the OSHA guidelines. However, we believe that by following the suggestions in this and future articles, veterinarians will be able to create a hospital safety program that will substantially comply with OSHA guidelines and that will ensure a safe workplace for themselves and their employees.— Kurt J. Matushek, Assistant Editor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In an earlier article (JAVMA, Jan 15, 1994), the author outlined some of the first steps necessary in establishing a hospital safety program that will comply with current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines. One of the main concerns of the OSHA guidelines is that there be written plans for managing hazardous materials, performing dangerous jobs, and dealing with other potential safety problems. In this article, the author discusses potentially hazardous situations commonly found in veterinary practices and provides details on how to minimize the risks associated with those situations and how to implement safety procedures that will comply with the OSHA guidelines.—Kurt J. Matushek, Assistant Editor.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association