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History

A 9-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was admitted for evaluation following a 2-month history of intermittent pollakiuria, stranguria, and observation of a mass in the caudoventral aspect of the abdomen. The abdominal mass would vary in size, and when palpated by the owner, the cat would urinate. On physical examination, a large, firm mass was palpated along the ventral midline just caudal to the umbilicus. The overlying skin was mildly bruised. Radiographs of the abdomen were obtained (Figure 1).

Left lateral (A) and ventrodorsal (B) radiographic views of the abdomen of a 9-year-old spayed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 16-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for progressive right hind limb lameness of 3 years' duration. On physical examination, the cat had a grade 1 to 2 (out of 4) lameness of the right hind limb. Palpation revealed decreased adduction of the limb and a firm 5- to 6-cm-diameter immovable mass emanating from the ventral aspect of the pubis, interfering with adduction of the limb. Findings on rectal examination and thoracic radiography were unremarkable. Radiographs of the pelvis were obtained (Figure 1).

Lateral (A) and ventrodorsal (B) radiographic views of the pelvis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 17-year-old castrated male Siamese cat was examined because of open-mouth breathing and cyanosis that had developed acutely within the preceding 30 minutes. The cat did not have a history of dyspnea or pulmonary disease. No known trauma was associated with acute onset of clinical signs. The cat had hyperthyroidism and was receiving methimazole. The only abnormality detected on serum biochemical analysis was mildly high serum thyroxine concentration. At the time of admission, the cat was not tested for heartworm disease or gastrointestinal parasites. The cat was severely dyspneic, and decreased airway sounds were detected in the dorsal aspect

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify surgical and postoperative complications of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) and compare their incidence with those reported in the literature for other commonly performed CCL stabilization procedures.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—346 dogs undergoing 397 TPLO procedures.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs undergoing 563 consecutive TPLO procedures were reviewed. Complications were recorded and assigned to groups on the basis of the period during which the complication was observed.

Results—397 TPLOs met the criteria for inclusion in the study. Complications (n = 136) were recorded in 113 of the 397 (28%) procedures. Multiple complications developed in 10 dogs. In 19 dogs, a second surgery was performed to manage complications. Development of a complication after surgery was not associated with age or body weight of the dog, tibial plateau angle prior to stifle joint surgery, or experience of the surgeon. Factors significantly associated with complications were breed and performance of an arthrotomy concomitantly with TPLO.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—TPLO was associated with development of numerous complications, some of which required surgical correction. Most complications resolved with nonsurgical treatment. Several complications were unique to the TPLO procedure because of the surgical technique and implants required. Although TPLO was associated with a greater number of complications than other CCL stabilization methods, the incidence of major complications was similar. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:184–193)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association