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  • Author or Editor: Peter S. MacWilliams x
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SUMMARY

Renal electrolyte and net acid excretion were characterized during generation and maintenance of hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis in a ruminant model. Two phases of renal response with regard to sodium and net acid excretion were documented. An initial decrease in net acid excretion was attributable to increase in bicarbonate excretion with associated increase in sodium excretion. As the metabolic disturbance became more advanced, a second phase of renal excretion was observed in which sodium and bicarbonate excretion were markedly decreased, leading to increase in net acid excretion and development of aciduria. Throughout the metabolic disturbance, chloride excretion was markedly decreased; potassium excretion also decreased. These changes were accompanied by increase in plasma renin and aldosterone concentrations. There was apparent failure to concentrate the urine optimally during the course of the metabolic disturbance, despite increasing plasma concentration of antidiuretic hormone.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate the bactericidal properties of chlorhexidine diacetate (CHD) after potentiation with EDTA and Tris buffer (EDTA-Tris), and to find a potentiated CHD concentration that would achieve 90 to 100% killing for all bacteria tested.

Animals

6 adult ponies.

Procedure

Serial dilutions of CHD, CHD in EDTA-Tris, and EDTA-Tris alone were evaluated for bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus zooepidemicus. The tarsocrural joints of 6 ponies were lavaged with either 1 L of phosphate buffered saline solution (control) or 1 L of 0.0005% CHD in EDTA-Tris. Synovial fluid was collected before lavage and on days 1,4, and 8. Synovia, cartilage, and bone with cartilage were collected on day 8 when the ponies were euthanatized.

Results

In vitro results indicated that 0.0005% CHD in EDTA-Tris was 90% lethal to all bacteria tested. Results of synovial fluid analysis, glycosaminoglycan analysis, and histologic examination of the synovial membrane and articular cartilage indicated that joint lavage with 0.0005% CHD in EDTA-Tris was not detrimental to the synovium or the articular cartilage of pony tarsocrural joints. Changes observed were a result of the actual lavage process, the phosphate-buffered saline solution, and hemarthrosis.

Conclusions

A concentration of 0.0005% CHD in EDTA-Tris was 90% lethal to all bacteria tested. Pony tarsocrural joint lavage with 0.0005% CHD in EDTA-Tris was not detrimental to the synovium or the articular cartilage. The efficacy of 0.0005% CHD potentiated with EDTA-Tris as a potential joint lavage fluid for treatment of infectious arthritis needs to be evaluated in clinical patients. (Am J Vet Res 1996; 57:756–761)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis accompanied by hypokalemia and hyponatremia was induced experimentally in 7 adult sheep by diversion (loss) of gastric contents through an Ivan and Johnston cannula placed in the cranial part of the duodenum just distal to the pylorus. Cannula placement was easily accomplished, and cannulae were tolerated well by the sheep. Volume of effluent produced during the 60- to 120-hour period of diversion ranged from 7.7 to 14.9 L and tended to be greatest during the first 24 hours. All sheep became dehydrated, with mean pcv and plasma total protein concentration increases of 94.2 and 61.7%, respectively. Plasma chloride concentration decreased in linear fashion from a prediversion mean of 113 mEq/L (range, 111 to 117 mEq/L) to an end-point mean of 54 mEq/L (range, 45 to 65 mEq/L). Plasma sodium and potassium concentrations also decreased, though potassium concentration increased terminally. There were rapid increases in arterial blood pH and bicarbonate and base excess concentrations during the first 48 hours after diversion. However, during the final stages of diversion, sheep developed superimposed metabolic acidosis with increased plasma lactate concentration and high anion gap.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research