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SUMMARY

Objective

To determine ocular dimensions (using A-scan ultrasound biometry) and corneal curvature (using keratometry) in the feline eye and to calculate the appropriate dioptric power for a prototype posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) necessary to achieve emmetropia in the eyes of cats undergoing lens extraction.

Animals

25 clinically normal adult mixed-breed cats and 10 eyes from 10 clinically normal adult mixed-breed cat cadavers.

Procedure

A-scan ultrasonic biometry was performed on both eyes of each live cat. Cats were tranquilized, and keratometry was performed on each eye. Biometry was performed on the cadaver eyes. Five of the cadaver eyes had the lens extracted and an IOL, designed for use in dogs, was implanted. Biometry was repeated to estimate postoperative IOL position. Using 3 theoretical IOL formulas, data from biometry, keratometry, and postoperative IOL position were used to predict IOL strength required to achieve emmetropia after lens extraction in cats.

Results

Mean axial length of eyes in live cats was 20.91 ± 0.53 mm. Mean preoperative anterior chamber depth (ACD) was 5.07 ± 0.36 mm, and mean lens thickness was 7.77 ± 0.23 mm. Predicted postoperative ACD was calculated to be 10.84 mm. Measured postoperative ACD in the 5 cadaver eyes was 8.28 mm. Required IOL strength calculated, using the predicted postoperative ACD, was 73 to 76 diopters. The required IOL strength calculated, using the measured postoperative ACD, was 53 to 55 diopters.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

An IOL of substantially higher diopter strength than that needed in dogs is required to achieve emmetropia after lens extraction in average cats; an IOL strength of approximately 53 to 55 diopters will likely be required. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:131–134)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Adrenocortical tumors were diagnosed in 5 adult spayed ferrets. Four ferrets had bilaterally symmetrical alopecia of the caudal femoral region, abdomen, and tail, and 1 had alopecia of the distal limbs and feet. All 5 ferrets had vulvar swelling. During abdominal ultrasonography, irregular masses, believed to involve the adrenal glands, were seen in all 5 ferrets. Unilateral adrenalectomy was performed successfully in each ferret by use of ventral midline celiotomy. On histologic examination of biopsy samples, 4 ferrets were found to have adrenocortical adenomas, and 1 ferret was found to have an adrenocortical adenocarcinoma. All clinical signs resolved after adrenalectomy, suggesting that the adrenocortical tumors had been secreting adrenocortical hormones.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To characterize the pathogenic potential of a unique Borrelia isolate obtained from a dog from Florida (FCB isolate).

Design

Prospective experimental infection.

Animals

32 preweanling Swiss Webster mice and 12 adult male Hartley guinea pigs were injected intraperitoneally with 105 spirochetes.

Procedure

Mice were used as controls and blood recipients, and at 3- to 4-day intervals, 1 control mouse and 2 infected mice were necropsied, tissues were cultured, and a recipient mouse was inoculated with blood. Guinea pigs were randomized to 4 groups and inoculated intradermally with 100, 102, 103, or 104 spirochetes. For 48 days, clinical, hematologic, serologic, and microbiologic tests were performed on them, after which they were necropsied.

Results

In mice, spirochetemia was detectable between postinoculation days (PID) 3 and 13, and seroreactivity to homologous antigen was detectable during PID 10 through 31. Compared with control mice, infected mouse spleens were 2 to 3 times larger. Histologic lesions included lymphoid hyperplasia, neutrophilic panniculitis, epicarditis, and myocarditis, with intralesional spirochetes detected from PID 3 through 6. During PID 10 through 31, nonsuppurative epicarditis developed. Signs of illness and hematologic abnormalities were not observed in guinea pigs, despite isolating spirochetes from blood during PID 7 to 27. When necropsied on PID 48, histologic lesions included lymphoid hyperplasia and lymphocytic plasmacytic epicarditis.

Conclusions

The FCB isolate causes spirochetemia, lymphoid hyperplasia, dermatitis, and myocardial injury in Swiss Webster mice and can be transmitted by blood inoculation. In Hartley guinea pigs, the isolate causes spirochetemia, lymphoid hyperplasia, and epicarditis. Documentation of disease in mice, guinea pigs, and, presumably, dogs raises the level of concern that the FCB isolate might be pathogenic for man and other animal species. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:505–511)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Assays were validated for the measurement of urinary concentrations of cortisol and creatinine in domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Urinary concentrations of cortisol and creatinine and the calculated urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio (UCCR) values were determined for 29 clinically normal female ferrets, 22 clinically normal male ferrets, and 12 ferrets with adrenal gland tumors. The UCCR values for the 51 clinically normal ferrets ranged from 0.04 × 10-6 to 1.66 × 10-6, with a median value of 0.22 × 10-6. The UCCR values were significantly (P ≤ 0.01) higher in the 12 ferrets with adrenal tumors, with a range of 0.5 × 10-6 to 60.13 × 10-6 and a median of 5.98 × 10-6. We concluded that determination of UCCR values was useful in the diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism associated with adrenal neoplasia in domestic ferrets.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association