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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of bilateral ventriculocordectomy via ventral laryngotomy on laryngeal airway resistance (LAR) in canine cadaver larynges.

SAMPLE 6 clinically normal canine cadaver larynges.

PROCEDURES LAR was determined for each specimen before (baseline) and after bilateral ventriculocordectomy with the epiglottis open and closed. After ventral laryngotomy was performed, the vocal cords were sharply excised, and the incised mucosal edges were apposed with 4-0 glycomer 631 suture in a simple continuous pattern. The thyroid cartilage was apposed with 3-0 polypropylene suture in a simple continuous pattern.

RESULTS With the epiglottis closed, baseline median LAR was 27.6 cm H2O/L/s (range, 21.2 to 30.6 cm H2O/L/s), which did not differ significantly from the median LAR after bilateral ventriculocordectomy (24.7 cm H2O/L/s [range, 20.6 to 27.7 cm H2O/L/s]). With the epiglottis open, baseline median LAR was 7.3 cm H2O/L/s (range, 5.4 to 7.8 cm H2O/L/s), which did not differ significantly from the median LAR after bilateral ventriculocordectomy (7.2 cm H2O/L/s [range, 6.6 to 7.6 cm H2O/L/s]).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Bilateral ventriculocordectomy did not affect LAR with an open epiglottis in canine cadaver larynges. Therefore, it may not be an effective treatment for laryngeal paralysis. It also did not affect LAR with a closed epiglottis, which may indicate protection against aspiration pneumonia.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare security of continuous intradermal suture lines closed by use of barbed suture with 3 end-pass configurations or without an end-pass configuration.

SAMPLE 40 full-thickness, 4-cm-long, parasagittal wounds in canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES Each continuous intradermal closure was terminated with 1 of 3 end-pass techniques or without an end-pass configuration (control group). A servohydraulic machine applied tensile load perpendicular to the long axis of the suture line. A load-displacement curve was generated for each sample; maximum load, displacement, stiffness, mode of construct failure, and load at first suture slippage at termination (ie, terminal end of the suture line) were recorded.

RESULTS Values for maximum load, displacement, and stiffness did not differ significantly among the 3 end-pass techniques, and load at first suture slippage at termination was not significantly different among the 4 groups. A 1-pass technique slipped in 5 of 9 samples; 3 of these 5 slips caused failure of wound closure. A 2-pass technique slipped in 3 of 9 samples, none of which caused failure of wound closure. Another 2-pass technique slipped in 4 of 10 samples; 2 of these 4 slips caused failure of wound closure. The control group had slippage in 10 of 10 samples; 9 of 10 slips caused failure of wound closure

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE An end-pass anchor was necessary to terminate a continuous intradermal suture line, and all 3 end-pass anchor techniques were suitable to prevent wound disruption. The 2-pass technique for which none of the suture slippages caused wound closure failure provided the most reliable configuration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the feasibility of sidestream dark field (SDF) video microscopy for the evaluation of the jejunal microvasculature of healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

30 healthy sexually intact female shelter dogs anesthetized for ovariohysterectomy.

PROCEDURES

Preoperative physical and clinicopathologic assessments were performed to confirm health status. Then healthy dogs were anesthetized, and the abdomen was incised at the ventral midline for ovariohysterectomy and jejunal microvasculature evaluation. An SDF video microscope imaged the microvasculature of 2 sites of a portion of the jejunum, and recorded videos were analyzed with software capable of quantitating parameters of microvascular health. Macrovascular parameters (heart rate, respiratory rate, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation) were also recorded during anesthesia.

RESULTS

Quantified jejunal microvascular parameters included valid microvascular density (mean ± SD, 251.72 ± 97.10 μm/mm), RBC-filling percentage (66.96 ± 8.00%), RBC column width (7.11 ± 0.72 μm), and perfused boundary region (2.17 ± 0.42 μm). The perfused boundary region and RBC-filling percentage had a significant negative correlation. Strong to weak positive correlations were noted among the perfused boundary regions of small-, medium-, and large-sized microvessels. No significant correlations were identified between microvascular parameters and age, body weight, preoperative clinicopathologic results, or macrovascular parameters.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Interrogation of the jejunal microvasculature of healthy dogs with SDF video microscopy was feasible. Results of this study indicated that SDF video microscopy is worth additional investigation, including interrogation of diseased small intestine in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare volumes of square knots and Aberdeen knots in vitro and evaluate security of these knot types when used as buried terminal knots for continuous intradermal wound closures in canine cadavers.

Design—Experimental study.

Sample—24 surgically closed, full-thickness, 4-cm, epidermal wounds in 4 canine cadavers and 80 knots tied in vitro.

Procedures—Continuous intradermal closures were performed with 4–0 polyglyconate and completed with a buried knot technique. Surgeon (intern or experienced surgeon) and termination knot type (4-throw square knot or 2 + 1 Aberdeen knot; 12 each) were randomly assigned. Closed wounds were excised, and a servohydraulic machine applied tensile load perpendicular to the long axis of the suture line. A load-displacement curve was generated for each sample; maximum load, displacement, stiffness, and mode of construct failure were recorded. Volumes of 2 + 1 Aberdeen (n = 40) and 4-throw square knots (40) tied on a suture board were measured on the basis of a cylindrical model.

Results—Aberdeen knots had a mean smaller volume (0.00045 mm3) than did square knots (0.003838 mm3). Maximum load and displacement did not differ between construct types. Mean stiffness of Aberdeen knot constructs was greater than that of square knots.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The 2 + 1 Aberdeen knot had a smaller volume than the 4-throw square knot and was as secure. Although both knots may be reliably used in a clinical setting as the termination knot at the end of a continuous intradermal line, the authors advocate use of the Aberdeen terminal knot on the basis of ease of burying the smaller knot. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;247:260–266)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare initial leak pressure (ILP) between cadaveric canine and synthetic small intestinal segments that did and did not undergo enterotomy.

SAMPLE

Eight 8-cm grossly normal jejunal segments from 1 canine cadaver and eight 8-cm synthetic small intestinal segments.

PROCEDURES

Intestinal segments were randomly assigned to undergo enterotomy (6 cadaveric and 6 synthetic segments) or serve as untreated controls (2 cadaveric and 2 synthetic segments). For segments designated for enterotomy, a 2-cm full-thickness incision was created along the antimesenteric border. The incision was closed in a single layer with 4-0 suture in a simple continuous pattern. Leak testing was performed with intestinal segments occluded at both ends and infused with dilute dye solution (999 mL/h) until the solution was observed leaking from the suture line or serosal tearing occurred. Intraluminal pressure was continuously monitored. The ILP at construct failure was compared between cadaveric and synthetic control segments and between cadaveric and synthetic enterotomy segments.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD ILP did not differ significantly between cadaveric (345.11 ± 2.15 mm Hg) and synthetic (329.04 ± 24.69 mm Hg) control segments but was significantly greater for cadaveric enterotomy segments (60.77 ± 15.81 mm Hg), compared with synthetic enterotomy segments (15.03 ± 6.41 mm Hg).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leak testing should not be used to assess the accuracy or security of enterotomy suture lines in synthetic intestinal tissue. Synthetic intestinal tissue is best used for students to gain confidence and proficiency in performing enterotomies before performing the procedure on live animals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 1-year-old externally sexually intact female Great Dane was referred for further evaluation of abnormal and underdeveloped internal reproductive organs.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination findings included a cranioventrally displaced vulva and a grade 2/6 left apical systolic heart murmur. No uterus or ovaries were identified during abdominal ultrasonography. Computed tomography with retrograde vaginourethrography revealed an underdeveloped uterus and possible left intra-abdominal gonad. Karyotyping revealed mixed sex chromosomes (70% XY and 30% XX). Analysis of a serum sample yielded positive results for anti-Müllerian hormone; other findings included mid range estradiol concentration (48.2 pg/mL [within reference intervals for sexually intact and neutered males and females]), low progesterone concentration (< 0.2 ng/mL [within reference intervals for anestrous females]), and low testosterone concentration (< 20 ng/dL [similar to the expected concentration in neutered males]). Overall, the results of the sex hormone analyses were consistent with findings for either a sexually intact female or a neutered male dog. The dog's cardiac structure and function were echocardiographically normal.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog was anesthetized and underwent laparoscopic gonadectomy. The gonads, although abnormal and underdeveloped, were readily identified intraoperatively and successfully removed. On the basis of histologic findings, the removed gonads were confirmed to be rudimentary testicles. The dog recovered from anesthesia and surgery without complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Laparoscopic surgery was effective for visualization of abnormal and hypoplastic reproductive organs when abdominal ultrasonography and CT were of limited diagnostic usefulness, and laparoscopic surgery allowed straightforward gonadectomy in a 78,XX/78,XY chimeric dog.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the rate of postoperative dehiscence on the basis of intraoperative anastomotic leak test results (ie, positive or negative for leakage or testing not performed) between dogs that underwent hand-sewn anastomosis (HSA) or functional end-to-end stapled anastomosis (FEESA) of the small intestine.

ANIMALS

131 client-owned dogs that underwent 144 small intestinal anastomoses (94 FEESA and 50 HSA).

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify dogs that had undergone a small intestinal anastomosis (HSA or FEESA) from January 2008 through October 2019. Data were collected regarding signalment, indication for surgery, location of the anastomosis, surgical technique, the presence of preoperative septic peritonitis, performance of intraoperative leak testing, development of postoperative dehiscence, and duration of follow-up.

RESULTS

Intraoperative leak testing was performed during 62 of 144 (43.1%) small intestinal anastomoses, which included 26 of 94 (27.7%) FEESAs and 36 of 50 (72.0%) HSAs. Thirteen of 144 (9.0%) anastomoses underwent dehiscence after surgery (median, 4 days; range, 2 to 17 days), with subsequent septic peritonitis, including 10 of 94 (10.6%) FEESAs and 3 of 50 (6.0%) HSAs. The incidence of postoperative dehiscence was not significantly different between FEESAs and HSAs; between anastomoses that underwent intraoperative leak testing and those that did not, regardless of anastomotic technique; or between anastomoses with positive and negative leak test results. Hand-sewn anastomoses were significantly more likely to undergo leak testing than FEESAs. Preoperative septic peritonitis, use of omental or serosal reinforcement, preoperative serum albumin concentration, and surgical indication were not significantly different between anastomotic techniques.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Performance of intraoperative anastomotic leak testing, regardless of the anastomotic technique, was not associated with a reduction in the incidence of postoperative anastomotic dehiscence.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To utilize the geometry of superficial anatomic landmarks to guide incisional location and orientation for peripheral lymphadenectomy, document deep anatomic landmarks for lymphocentrum identification, and develop novel surgical approaches to the superficial cervical, axillary, and superficial inguinal lymphocentrums in dogs.

ANIMALS

12 canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES

2 cadavers were used for a pilot investigation to determine optimal body positioning, select superficial anatomic landmarks for lymphocentrum identification, and evaluate novel surgical approaches to the 3 lymphocentrums. These lymphocentrums were then dissected in 10 additional cadavers using these novel surgical approaches. Measurements of the distances from lymphocentrum to landmark and between landmarks were obtained for each lymphocentrum. Deep anatomic landmarks were recorded for each dissection. The mean and SD were calculated for each measurement and used to develop geometric guidelines for estimating the location of each lymphocentrum for these surgical approaches.

RESULTS

Each peripheral lymphocentrum was found in the same location relative to the respective, predetermined, superficial, anatomic boundaries in all cadavers. Briefly, the superficial landmarks to each lymphocentrum were as follows: (1) superficial cervical: wing of atlas, acromion process of scapula, greater tubercle of humerus; (2) axillary: caudal border of transverse head of superficial pectoral muscle, caudal triceps muscle, ventral midline; and (3) superficial inguinal: origin of pectineus muscle, ipsilateral inguinal mammary gland, ventral midline. The proposed superficial and deep surgical landmarks were identified within every cadaver. The previously undescribed surgical approaches were effective for lymphocentrum identification.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Anatomic landmarks provided in this study may help reduce surgical time and tissue trauma during peripheral lymphadenectomy in dogs. This study was also the first to describe a surgical approach to the superficial inguinal lymphocentrum and ventral approaches to the superficial cervical and axillary lymphocentrums and provided previously unpublished anatomic landmarks for a lateral approach to the superficial cervical lymphocentrum.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effect of a geometric, landmark-guided lymphadenectomy (LL) approach to peripheral lymph nodes (LNs) on successful LN identification, surgical time, tissue trauma, and ease of LN identification compared to standard lymphadenectomy (SL) and methylene blue–guided lymphadenectomy (MBL).

SAMPLE

18 adult, mixed-breed canine cadavers operated on by 7 veterinarians and 5 fourth-year veterinary students between July 23 and October 12, 2022.

METHODS

Participants were provided standardized, publicly available materials regarding the anatomy and surgical techniques for SL of 3 peripheral lymphocentrums: superficial cervical, axillary (ALN), and superficial inguinal (SILN). Participants performed the 3 SLs unilaterally on canine cadavers. Thereafter, they were randomly assigned to 2 crossover groups: MBL and LL. All dissections were separated by at least 2 weeks for each participant. Primary outcome measures included successful LN identification, surgical time, tissue trauma scores, and subjective difficulty.

RESULTS

Successful LN identification was highest with LL (86%) compared to SL (69%) and MBL (67%). Subjective difficulty scores were reduced with LL for SILN dissections. Tissue trauma scores were reduced when using LL for ALN and SILN compared to MBL and SL. Time to LN identification was reduced for ALN with LL. No significant differences were observed between MBL and SL, or for the superficial cervical dissections.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Peripheral lymphadenectomies are time consuming and difficult for veterinarians in early stages of surgical training. Little surgical guidance is provided within current literature. Geometric, landmark-guided lymphadenectomies may improve LN identification success and reduce surgical time, tissue trauma, and procedure difficulty, which could encourage their clinical application.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the feasibility and technique for performing laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS) of the liver in dogs.

ANIMALS

12 client-owned dogs presenting for elective laparoscopic surgery from January 1, 2022, to October 31, 2022.

METHODS

Laparoscopic exploration and LUS of the liver were performed in all dogs. Dogs were positioned in reverse Trendelenburg and laterally rotated to facilitate access to all liver lobes. Time to perform laparoscopic exploration and LUS, ability to visualize and access each liver lobe entirely, and any complications were recorded. Each dog underwent an elective laparoscopic procedure. The surgeon completed a National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire after surgery.

RESULTS

Mean body weight was 25.9 kg (SD, ± 4.1 kg; range, 5.7 to 62 kg). All liver lobes were scanned to the level of the hilus in 10/12 dogs. In 2 dogs, the caudate lobe could not be completely imaged. Median time to perform LUS was 9 minutes (IQR, 5 to 16.5 minutes), and median NASA-TLX score was 9/100 (IQR, 6.3 to 20). There was a significantly strong negative correlation between time to perform LUS (r = −0.77; P = .0037) and NASA-TLX score (r = −0.84; P = .0006) with trial number. Minor complications occurred in 2 dogs during laparoscopic exploration. No complications occurred during LUS.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

LUS was feasible and safe in all dogs. The right lateral and caudate lobes were occasionally challenging to access. Technical demand and time to perform LUS improved with experience, suggesting a learning curve. Evaluation of LUS in dogs with clinical disease is warranted.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research