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  • Author or Editor: Patty L. Bonney x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether use of topical flea and tick products increases the risk of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder in Scottish Terriers.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—87 adult Scottish Terriers with TCC (cases) and 83 adult Scottish Terriers with other health-related conditions (controls).

Procedure—Owners of study dogs were recruited through private veterinary practices and the Scottish Terrier Club of America. History of exposure to flea and tick products 1 year prior to diagnosis of TCC for case dogs and during a comparable period for control dogs was obtained through a questionnaire. Risk of TCC associated with exposure to flea and tick products was determined by means of univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results—After adjustment for host factors, Scottish Terriers treated with topical spot-on flea and tick products containing fipronil or imidacloprid did not have an increased risk of TCC, compared with Scottish Terriers that had never been exposed to any flea and tick products. The risk of TCC associated with use of older topical flea and tick products such as shampoos, dips, powders, sprays, and collars could not be evaluated because of the low number of owners in the study population that had used such products.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that use of topical spot-on flea and tick products does not increase the risk of TCC in Scottish Terriers. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:389–394)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether exposure to lawn or garden chemicals was associated with an increased risk of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder in Scottish Terriers.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—83 Scottish Terriers with TCC (cases) and 83 Scottish Terriers with other health-related conditions (controls).

Procedure—Owners of study dogs completed a written questionnaire pertaining to exposure to lawn or garden chemicals during the year prior to diagnosis of TCC for case dogs and during a comparable period for control dogs.

Results—The risk of TCC was significantly increased among dogs exposed to lawns or gardens treated with both herbicides and insecticides (odds ratio [OR], 7.19) or with herbicides alone (OR, 3.62), but not among dogs exposed to lawns or gardens treated with insecticides alone (OR, 1.62), compared with dogs exposed to untreated lawns. Exposure to lawns or gardens treated with phenoxy herbicides (OR, 4.42) was associated with an increased risk of TCC, compared with exposure to untreated lawns or gardens, but exposure to lawns or gardens treated with nonphenoxy herbicides (OR, 3.49) was not significantly associated with risk of TCC.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that exposure to lawns or gardens treated with herbicides was associated with an increased risk of TCC in Scottish Terriers. Until additional studies are performed to prove or disprove a cause-and-effect relationship, owners of Scottish Terriers should minimize their dogs' access to lawns or gardens treated with phenoxy herbicides. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004; 24:1290–1297)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of vegetable consumption and vitamin supplementation on the risk of developing transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder in Scottish Terriers.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—92 adult Scottish Terriers with TCC (cases) and 83 Scottish Terriers with other conditions (controls).

Procedure—Owners of dogs with TCC completed a questionnaire regarding their dogs' diet and intake of vitamin supplements in the year prior to diagnosis of TCC; owners of control dogs completed the questionnaire for a comparable time period. The risk (odds ratio [OR]) of developing TCC associated with diet and vitamin supplementation was determined by use of logistic regression.

Results—After adjustment for age, weight, neuter status, and coat color, there was an inverse association between consumption of vegetables at least 3 times/wk (OR, 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15 to 0.62) and risk of developing TCC. For individual vegetable types, the risk of developing TCC was inversely associated with consumption of green leafy vegetables (OR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.97) and yellow-orange vegetables (OR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.70). Consumption of cruciferous vegetables was not significantly associated with a similar reduction in risk of developing TCC (OR, 0.22; CI, 0.04 to 1.11). The power of the study to detect a 50% reduction in TCC risk associated with daily vitamin supplementation was considered low (25%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that consumption of certain vegetables may prevent or slow the development of TCC in Scottish Terriers. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:94–100)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxic effects of a conservative dose of cisplatin administered in combination with piroxicam to dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder.

Design—Clinical trial (nonrandomized, noncontrolled).

Animals—14 client-owned dogs with histologically confirmed TCC of the urinary bladder.

Procedures—Each dog was treated with cisplatin (50 mg/m2, IV, q 21 d [reduced to 40 mg/m2, IV, q 21 d because of toxic effects]) and piroxicam (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). A CBC, serum biochemical analyses, and urinalysis were performed prior to each cisplatin treatment. Tumor staging (determined from thoracic and abdominal radiographic and urinary bladder ultrasonographic findings) was performed before treatment and at 6-week intervals during treatment.

Results—5 dogs received only 1 dose of cisplatin because of the rapid progression of disease (n = 2) or toxic effects (3). With regard to the neoplastic disease among the other 9 dogs, 1 had partial remission, 5 had stable disease, and 3 had progressive disease after 6 weeks of treatment. Median progression-free interval was 78 days (range, 20 to 112 days). Median survival time was 307 days (range, 29 to 929 days). Moderate to severe renal toxicosis and moderate to severe gastrointestinal toxicosis developed in 5 and 8 dogs, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Because of minimal efficacy and associated renal and gastrointestinal toxicosis, administration of cisplatin (40 to 50 mg/m2) with piroxicam cannot be recommended for treatment of dogs with TCC of the urinary bladder.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the outcome in dogs undergoing urethral stent placement for management of urethral obstruction secondary to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—19 dogs with histopathologically confirmed TCC.

Procedures—Information regarding urethral stent placement and follow-up treatment was obtained from review of medical records. Quality of life assessment was performed with an owner questionnaire.

Results—Self-expanding nitinol stents were successfully placed in 17 of 19 dogs; stent placement was not possible in one dog, and another dog was euthanatized 2 days after stent placement, but before discharge from the hospital. Median survival time in 17 dogs following successful long-term stent placement was 78 days (range, 2 to 366 days). Complications following stent placement in 18 dogs included incontinence (n = 7), reobstruction from continued growth of urethral TCC (3), acute reobstruction shortly after the procedure (1), and stent migration (2). Of the 17 owners surveyed, 16 were satisfied with the outcome and would recommend urethral stent placement.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The placement of self-expanding nitinol urethral stents was successful in alleviating TCC-induced urethral obstruction and providing good quality of life for most dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the antitumor and toxic effects of treatment with doxorubicin combined with piroxicam or doxorubicin alone for multicentric lymphoma in dogs.

Design—Nonrandomized clinical trial.

Animals—75 dogs with multicentric lymphoma.

Procedure—33 dogs were treated with doxorubicin (30 mg/m2, IV, q 21 d, for 3 doses) and piroxicam (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h); results were compared with a historical control group of 42 dogs treated with doxorubicin (30 mg/m2, IV, q 21 d, for 3 doses) alone.

Results—The percentages of dogs that had remission with doxorubicin-piroxicam treatment (79%) or doxorubicin treatment alone (74%) were not significantly different. Median duration of first remission was 130 days with doxorubicin-piroxicam and 147 days with doxorubicin alone; these values were not significantly different. Severe toxicosis was observed in 22% of dogs treated with doxorubicin-piroxicam and 17% of dogs treated with doxorubicin alone.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Both treatment protocols were efficacious and well tolerated. The doxorubicin-piroxicam treatment was no more effective regarding response rate, remission duration, or survival duration, compared with the control group treated with doxorubicin alone. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1813–1817)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxic effects of deracoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, in dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—26 client-owned dogs with naturally occurring, histologically confirmed, measurableTCC of the urinary bladder.

Procedures—Dogs were treated PO with deracoxib at a dosage of 3 mg/kg/d (1.36 mg/lb/d) as a single-agent treatment for TCC. Tumor response was assessed via radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and ultrasonographic mapping of urinary bladder masses. Toxic effects of deracoxib administration in dogs were assessed through clinical observations and hematologic and biochemical analyses.

Results—Of 24 dogs for which tumor response was assessed, 4 (17%) had partial remission, 17 (71%) had stable disease, and 3 (13%) had progressive disease; initial response could not be assessed in 2 of 26 dogs. The median survival time was 323 days. Median time to progressive disease was 133 days. Renal, hepatic, and gastrointestinal abnormalities attributed to deracoxib administration were noted in 4% (1/26), 4% (1/26), and 19% (5/26) of dogs, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that deracoxib was generally well tolerated by dogs and had antitumor activity against TCC.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine uroplakin III expression, potential etiologic factors, biological behavior, and treatment response of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in the abdominal wall (ABWTCC) in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—24 dogs with TCC of the urinary tract that also had histopathologic confirmation of ABWTCC.

Procedures—Medical records, histologic slides, radiographs, and ultrasonographic images of dogs with ABWTCC between July 1, 1985, and December 31, 2010, were reviewed. In available tissue specimens, immunohistochemistry was used to detect uroplakin III expression in the ABWTCC and in the primary tumor.

Results—The ABWTCC lesions ranged from < 2 to > 20 cm in diameter. Uroplakin III was expressed in 19 of 20 primary tumors and 17 of 17 ABWTCCs. Transitional cell carcinoma in the abdominal wall developed significantly more often in dogs that had undergone cystotomy (18/177 [10.2%]) than in those that had not (6/367 [1.6%]). In 1 dog that had not undergone cystotomy, TCC had invaded through the urinary bladder wall and spread down the median ligament to the abdominal wall. None of 18 dogs that received anticancer drugs had remission of the ABWTCC once clinically detected; median survival time after ABWTCC detection was 57 days (range, 0 to 324 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that ABWTCC is uncommon, but once TCC becomes established and clinically detectable in the abdominal wall, it carries a poor prognosis. It is crucial to minimize risk of TCC seeding at surgery. Percutaneous sampling of TCC should be avoided. Uroplakin III is commonly expressed in ABWTCC.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the antitumor effects and toxicoses of metronomic oral administration of a low dose of chlorambucil in dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

Design—Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—31 client-owned dogs with TCC for which prior treatments had failed or owners had declined other treatments.

Procedures—Chlorambucil (4 mg/m2, PO, q 24 h) was administered to dogs. Before and at scheduled times during treatment, evaluations of dogs included physical examination, CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, thoracic and abdominal imaging including cystosonography for measurement of TCCs, and grading of toxicoses.

Results—29 of 31 dogs had failed prior TCC treatment. Of the 30 dogs with available data, 1 (3%) had partial remission (≥ 50% reduction in tumor volume), 20 (67%) had stable disease (< 50% change in tumor volume), and 9 (30%) had progressive disease (≥ 50% increase in tumor volume or development of additional tumors); 1 dog was lost to follow-up. The median progression-free interval (time from the start of chlorambucil treatment to the day progressive disease was detected) for the dogs was 119 days (range, 7 to 728 days). The median survival time of dogs from the time of the start of chlorambucil treatment was 221 days (range, 7 to 747 days). Few toxicoses were detected; chlorambucil administration was discontinued because of toxicoses in only 1 dog.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Metronomic administration of chlorambucil was well tolerated, and 70% of dogs had partial remission or stable disease. Metronomic administration of chlorambucil may be a treatment option for dogs with TCC.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association